All things history and genealogy.

All things history and genealogy.

Who’ulda Thought Headstone Hunting Could Be Such Fun?

Although my husband and children all enjoy hunting moose, headstone hunting is about as far as I’ll go.
headstone hunting at Melanson Community Hall
Melanson Community Hall in the town of Melanson. My mother’s maiden name is Melanson.

About six years ago, we decided to take our one and only big family vacation – a three week driving trip from central Ontario to Acadian territories in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

Although this was a planned vacation, it was an opportunity as well to teach the kids something of their Acadian heritage and see the area in which my mother, her family and ancestors lived for generations.

Melanson Mountain Sign, across from the Melanson Community Hall while headstone hunting.
Melanson Mountain Sign, across from the Melanson Community Hall.

We did a lot of sightseeing in places like Moncton to see the tidal bore of the Bay of Fundy, and the Hopewell Rocks where I got a wonderful picture of Erin and Stuart against the rocks at high tide. I’ve since had several people accuse me of having ‘photoshopped’ the photo, but that’s not the case at all.

Other sites along our journey were:

  • Fort Edward and Fort Beausejour, where several of our ancestors were imprisoned during the Acadian Expulsion;
Grand Pré Chapel while headstone hunting.
Grand Pré Chapel.
  • Grand Pré, the site of the meeting in which Acadian men were informed of their imminent expulsion;
  • Melanson village and mountain, the site of the settlement of one original Melanson brother and pioneer, Pierre Melanson and his descendants;
  • Melanson Settlement, the historic site where our ancestor Charles, the other pioneer brother, settled;
  • Fort Anne, where we had the experience of a lifetime, experiencing the highly entertaining ‘Graveyard Tour‘ hosted by Alan Melanson, a distant cousin; our unexpected discovery of an original ‘aboiteau’ from the Melanson Settlement site, a hollowed wooden log with a hinged valve at one end which was used to drain the water from the fields (it had been in storage at North Hills Museum and she took us to see it when she heard me talking about it); and a visit to Ste. Anne University, where the students and staff were very knowledgeable and amazingly helpful, finding a great deal of documentation for my research.
The mysterious aboiteau used by the Acadians found on our headstone hunting trip.
The mysterious aboiteau used by the Acadians to control the water on the marshes where they homesteaded and farmed.

Our most unexpected discovery was at a tiny, charming Catholic church in Argyle, near Yarmouth, Nova Scotia.

When driving through we spotted a graveyard with hundreds of headstones right along side the road, noticing right away that there were some very old headstones in the mix. At my request, Mark stopped the car and we got out to have a look.

Ste. Anne Catholic Church in Argyle, Nova Scotia - headstone hunting trip.
Ste. Anne Catholic Church and graveyard in Argyle, Nova Scotia – where we spent one Sunday morning headstone hunting.

Our plan was that Mark would have the camera, I would have my notebook to write hard-to-read transcriptions, and Erin and Stuart would be the scouts, running ahead, raising their hands and shouting to let us know they’d found a ‘Melanson’ or ‘Fougere’ headstone.

Now this was a really quiet, cool, damp day and we were just waiting for the rain that appeared to be imminent, but that didn’t deter us. We made short work of the task, and went through the vast graveyard in great speed.

It wasn’t long after starting though, that I noticed the cars driving by slowing right down to check us out and see what we were doing. Some actually came to a dead stop in the middle of the road. Upon reflection, I realized how odd we all must have looked – especially the kids, running from headstone to headstone, raising their hands and shouting. Did they think we were playing some kind of game?

As silly as we must have looked, it was a great deal of fun and it’s a trip we all talk of to this day. We’d all love to do it again.

King Richard III’s genome to be sequenced by scientists.

Previous posts I’ve written described our fascination with King Richard III and the search for his grave, which ended successfully when his skeleton was unearthed in a Leicester parking lot in England.

Richard III, King of England

Now scientists have announced they will be sequencing Richard III’s DNA, which is of great interest to us and numerous other descendants of Richard III and his family.

He is an ancestor of Mark’s family and has been the subject of some research on my part. The resulting posts were:

Richard III's grave in Leicester parking lot.I’ve been toying with the idea of getting Mark’s and my DNA, and now that DNA profiles are more prevalent, it’s looking more and more like it would be a worthwhile endeavor.

Tombstone plaque for Richard III.Research can only be so accurate. Every family and generation has experienced their scandals and secrets that were never documented, and which may have affected the recorded ancestries, such as a child born from an illicit affair that was never disclosed. Even more questionable are the undocumented connections.

DNA might be helpful in solving some mysteries in more recent generations of branches of my family, as it is the one and only way we might have to prove blood connections to family and ancestors, either confirming or refuting the documentary evidence. It would be wonderful to have some of my questions answered and suspicions and theories confirmed.

photo credit: University of Leicester via photopin cc

photo credit: OZinOH via photopin cc

photo credit: lisby1 via photopin cc

Quidi Vidi Village: A Part of St. John’s, Apart From St. John’s | Academia.edu

Edited by Gerald L. Pocius and Lisa Wilson

Quidi Vidi Village
Quidi Vidi Village Fishing Stages

Fishing outports (like Quidi Vidi) typify the Newfoundland rural landscape, but fishing went on for generations within the confines of the city of St. John’s.

Seven years ago, public sector folklore graduate students documented the spaces of another St. John’s fishing community—the Battery—perched on the cliffs of St. John’s Harbour. The 2013 field school focused on the well-known fishing settlement within city boundaries—Quidi Vidi.

Quidi Vidi is the only community in the province that is actually referred to as a village— perhaps attesting to it being a place within a place. For generations, local residents have often referred to their living in Quidi Vidi Village, or simply—the Village. The community, therefore, has exhibited this dualidentity of being part of a city and being unique in its identity.

So to this unique place the participants of the 2013 field school turned their attention. Seven students spent three weeks in September, documenting a series of houses and outbuildings throughout the community.

These seven were: Christine Blythe (Florida), Kayla Carroll(Newfoundland), John Laduke (New York), Adrian Morrison (NovaScotia), Klara Nichter (Kentucky), Kari Sawden (Alberta), and XuanWang (China). Cyndi Egan (Florida) acted as the field school assistant.

Students were divided into three teams, and each group then documented one house. After this work, each student was responsible for the measuring of one outbuilding, and preparing the text for that plan, gathering information from interviews with the owners as well as describing the structure itself.

Besides the architectural research, each student wrote a brief essay on particular traditions found in the village, interviewing long-time residents about local knowledge and practices. 

Read on …

Source: Quidi Vidi Village: A Part of St. John’s, Apart From St. John’s | Academia.edu

Transcription: US, WWI Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 – John Croll Macpherson for John Croll MacPherson

This is my transcription of the US, WWI Draft Registration Card for John Croll Macpherson.

REGISTRATION CARD

US WWI Draft Registration Card for John MacPherson
US WWI Draft Registration Card for John MacPherson

SERIAL NUMBER: 1658

ORDER NUMBER: A782

CELL 1

John Crowl Macpherson     (First Name, Middle Name, Last Name)

CELL 2

PERMANENT HOME ADDRESS

1230 E. Flanders, Portland, Multnomah, Oregon     (No., Street or R.F.D. No., City or town, County, State)

CELL 3

Age in Years     32

CELL 4

Date of Birth     April 7, 1886     (Month, Day, Year)

_______________________________

RACE

CELL 5        White     X

CELL 6        Negro

CELL 7       Oriental

                    Indian

CELL 8       Citizen

CELL 9       Noncitizen

U.S. CITIZEN

CELL 10     Native Born

CELL 11     Naturalized

CELL 12     Citizen by Father’s Naturalization Before Registrant’s Majority

ALIEN    

CELL 13      Declarant     X

CELL 14      Non-declarant

CELL 15      If not a citizen of the U.S. of what nation are you a citizen or subject?     Scotland

PRESENT OCCUPATION

CELL 16      Mgr. Bakery

EMPLOYER’S NAME

CELL 17      Meier & Frank Co.

PLACE OF EMPLOYMENT OR BUSINESS

CELL 18      Sth (?) Morrison Portland Multnomah Or.     (No., Street or R.F.D. No., City or town, County, State)

NEAREST RELATIVE

NAME

CELL 19      Hilda Macpherson

ADDRESS

CELL 20      1230 E. Flanders Multnomah Or.     (No., Street or R.F.D. No., City or town, County, State)

I AFFIRM THAT I HAVE VERIFIED ABOVE ANSWERS AND THAT THEY ARE TRUE.

P.M.G.O.

Form No. 1 (Red)

John Croll MacPherson

(Registrant ?????????????????????)         (OVER)

REGISTRAR’S REPORT

36-1-16 “C”

DESCRIPTION OF REGISTRANT

HEIGHT

CELL 21      Tall

CELL 22      Medium     X

CELL 23      Short

BUILD

CELL 24      Slender

CELL 25      Medium

CELL 26      Stout

COLOR OF EYES

CELL 27      Brown

COLOR OF HAIR

CELL 28      Brown

CELL 29      Has person lost arm, leg, hand, eye, or is he obviously physically disqualified? (Specify.)     No.

CELL 30     

I certify that my answers are true; that the person registered has read or has had read to him his own answers; that I have witnessed his signature or mark, and that all of his answers of which I have knowledge are true, except as follows:

_____________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________

Mrs. William W. Porter

(Signature of Registrar)

Date of Registration     Sept. 12, 1918.

STAMP:

      |      LOCAL BOARD

      |     DIV. NO. 7

      |     COURT HOUSE

      |     PORTLAND, OREG.

(The stamp of the Local Board having jurisdiction of the area in which the registrant has his permanent home shall be placed in this box.)

??-????     (OVER)

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

Transcription: Whitcomb burials of Lancaster, Massachusetts, prior to 1850.

Whitcomb Burials
Whitcomb Burials

Transcription of the Whitcomb burials of Lancaster, Massachusetts, prior to  1850.

THE

BIRTH, MARRIAGE AND DEATH

REGISTER,

CHURCH RECORDS AND EPITAPHS

OF

LANCASTER, MASSACHUSETTS

1643-1850

EDITED BY
HENRY S. NOURSE, A. M.
______

LANCASTER:
1890

EPITAPHS IN LANCASTER BURIAL GROUNDS OF
DATE PRIOR TO 1850.
____________

Whitcomb BurialsTHE OLD BURIAL FIELD.

The founders of the town, and their descendants during the 17th century at least, buried their dead without formal services—foll0wing the custom of the Puritans in England-—and perhaps a plot of ground for the family graves was sometimes selected within the home lot or orchard. Early in the present century ancient graves were visible near the sites of both the Roper and the Prescott garrisons. But in the infancy of the Nashaway Plantation, land adjoining the meeting-house site was set apart for common use as a “burying place.” The practice of marking graves by incribed headstones probably did not begin until after the resettlement, one apparent exception being that of Mrs. Dorothy Prescott, who died in I674. The oldest date now to be found is that over the grave of the first ]ohn Houghton—I684. For half a century all memorial stones were but fragments of slate riven from some ledge, or rough granite slabs, upon which unskilled hands rudely incised name and date,—the latter being often upon a foot-stone or on the back of the head-stone. Many of the older inscriptions are illegible to most eyes. In his History of Lancaster, Reverend A. P. Marvin has given a plan of this ancient burial place, upon which the marked graves are located and numbered, and has added literal copies of the epitaphs. In the following carefully revised list of inscriptions the same numbering is adopted. Their arrangement is indicated by division lines. Numbers omitted are of stones not lettered, or of misplaced foot-stones found to belong with other numbers.

Whitcomb Burials of Lancaster, Massachusettts
Whitcomb Burials of Lancaster, Massachusettts

410

LANCASTER RECORDS.

HERE LIES BURIED I Ye BODY OF MR | JEREMIAH WILSON| WHO DEPARTED | THIS LIFE | MARCH Ye 22d | A D 1743 | IN Ye 77th YEAR | OF HIS AGE
HERE LIES | THE BODY OF | JOSIAH WHE | TCOMB SEN. D | ECEASED IN H | IS 80 YEAR | JW DYED | MARCH THE | 21 1718
Here Lyes Buried | ye Body of Mr | DAVID WHETCOMB \ Who Died April | 11th 1730 in ye 62d | Year of His Age
Here lied Buried | ye Body of Mrs. Mary | Whetcomb Wife to | Mr. David Whetcomb, | Who Died Janury | 5th, 1733-4 in ye 67th | Year of Her Age.
Here Lyes Buried | ye Body of Mr. HEZEKIAH WHETCOMB | Who Died May 6th. | 1732 in ye 31st Year | of His Age

Of the 4 Whetcomb gravestones legible prior to 1850 only the stone of Josiah Whetcomb remains in 2013.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

Here’s how to find unindexed records on Ancestry.com .

unindexed recordsNews Flash! Unindexed records are available on Ancestry.com and they can be searched if you know how.

I certainly didn’t realize that Ancestry.com indexing does not include all records until I read a post by Crista Cowan on the <a rel=”nofollow” href=”http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/07/25/browsing-records-on-ancestry-com-video/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ancestry+%28Ancestry.com +blog%29&utm_content=Netvibes” target=”_blank”>Ancestry.com blog.

For this reason, it can pay to view an entire record set for additional information. She includes a video tutorial for browsing full collections on Ancestry. This is a great way to find elusive information that could help get through those brick walls.

photo credit: deflam via photopin cc

Kaziah Hancock: Artist paints portraits in honor of fallen soldiers.

This video is actually quite old, but I find it – and the artist, Kaziah Hancock  – quite amazing!

Kaziah Hancock portrait.
Portrait of Dale Panchot by Kaziah Hancock.

She paints, frames, and ships the portraits of her ‘friends’ and ‘buddies’ to their grieving families, as with this one for Minnesota’s Dale Panchot.

I’m posting this video in honor of the US Memorial Day and the lost souls.

As a military daughter, wife and mother, I truly appreciate the efforts of anyone to honor our military heroes, especially those who gave their lives for their country, whatever country that may be.

photo credit: The U.S. Army via photopin cc

Chris Hadfield and Benedict Cumberbatch are cousins?

To coincide with the return of Commander Chris Hadfield from the international space station, Ancestry.ca has announced that he is 6th cousin to british actor Benedict Cumberbatch who is starring as the villain in Star Trek Into Darkness.

Chris Hadfield’s role being based in reality, Benedict Cumberbatch’s based in fantasy, they both explore the frontier of space.

I loved Benedict Cumberbatch as Sherlock Holmes in the recent series and as much as I’m indifferent to all space epics, I might just watch Star Trek Into Darkness, solely because he’s in it.

It’s a small world, uh-h-h, universe?

What happened to civility and cooperation in genealogy research?

The vast majority of my interactions with regard to my own genealogical research and that of fellow genealogists has been friendly, cooperative and extremely helpful. Infrequently, however, I have been in a position to wonder what is happening to the culture of civility and cooperation in genealogy research?
argument
Debate and controversy are good. Rudeness and harassment are not.

Although there have been small incidents that could be termed problematic, there were two situations which could be characterized as ongoing harassment.

I have been actively researching 4-8 hours per day for almost twenty years and have amassed a database of about 122,000 individuals.

Of these, about 20% are without sources and notes and could be considered speculative at best. Now here it is important to note that I have thousands of sources and images that are not yet attached to individuals. This is because I choose to make good use of my Ancestry.com subscription dollar and save the sources I find to an ‘unattached’ folder on my computer while entering the basic identifying information into my database.

When my subscription expires, I then take several months to attach the sources found to the individuals in the database. The result is that a number of the seemingly ‘unsourced’ individuals do have sources that have simply not been entered as yet.

I have been criticized for unsourced individuals being included in my database, but I do explain (and have a written policy on the site explaining) that I include unsourced information as the sources may simply have not been entered, or they are used as ‘clues’ to further research. Although there have been instances where the information – or at least part of it – was erroneous, the vast majority of these proved to be valid. All information in my database should be evaluated solely on the quality of the sources. If there are no sources, one can assume it is speculative and choose to not use it.

However, it is important to note that my online database has not been updated in months and I don’t intend to update it in future. This is because of issues with the software using identifying numbers which change with each and every update, causing numerous broken links and seriously affecting the performance of the site. If anyone knows of a genealogy website publishing system that allows for access to sources, images, etc. and uses the name and not ID numbers, please do let me know.

If you find a line you’re researching in my database online, feel free to contact me to inquire if I have any unentered sources, images or other information. I will gladly foward them and/or a gedcom of that particular branch.

I do, however, intend to transcribe sources on Empty Nest Genealogy, and these will include sources that are not actually entered into the online database, thereby making them available anyway. This will be a slow process, but I am working on it.

Now, back to these incidents.

Incident #1

The first of these occurred about a year ago when a woman named ‘Barbara’ emailed me about my efforts researching the family of James Harmond Reynolds, which includes extensive Hubbell and Keller lines. To illustrate our connection, the mother of my husband’s father and older brother remarried after a divorce to Harmond James Reynolds, whose mother was Elizabeth Keller (see chart).

What's happening to civility and cooperation in genealogy research?
Chart illustrating my family’s connection to the Hubbell / Keller lineage. (Click on the image to see it in full size.)

She berated me for using any Hubbell data as, according to her, we are not connected to the Hubbell lineage. Following is the copied and pasted email string to illustrate.

…I am contacting you, as you appear to be the link for the Blythe Family Tree on “Our Famiy History”  and you have the data of “The Descendants of Nehemiah Hubble and Lucretia Welton” included.  As I am the keeper of this information and this work is copyright protected, I am curious as to why you have included it.  There are only 12 “BLYTH” names in the book so if this means you are connected to one of them I would be interested in having your information.

What is very stressful, is that for whatever reason, be it a computer glitch or input, you have a number of inaccurate pieces of data and these inaccurate bits are not reflected in the book.

My request is simply that you remove the links to “The Descendants of Nehemiah Hubble and Lucretia Welton” or at least only show your direct relationship back to it.  As an organization we have worked very hard, for many years, getting the family data as correct as possible and again, very distressing to see it used in this way with so much incorrect data portrayed as though it comes from us…

Barbara

…I am sorry you feel this way. My father-in-law, Marshall Blythe is the step-son to James Reynolds and half-brother to William and Helen Reynolds, who are related to the Kellers and Hubbles. You can see the connection in the database.

Just because I have cited your publication does not mean it was used as the source for all of the data and sometimes where the data of more than one source conflicts, I have to choose what appears to be the most accurate data. You will see that there are several sources cited for each individual and/or fact – and not just yours. Are you positive the information you have is actually the correct information? Also, citing a publication as a source is not an infringement of copyright.

I would, however, like to know what information is incorrect and I will work to correct it. Unfortunately, in the exchange of genealogy information, mistakes do happen and I apologize for any that may exist in this data.

Without specific information about errors you have found, I will have to rework the data to try and find the errors you speak of. This could take a quite a while…

Christine

I can appreciate you entering the lineage back from your father-in-law relating to the Keller’s and Hubble’s but since you aren’t doing the actual research for the entire HUBBLE descendants of Rawdon – and I am – and I was the person who did the work for the publication of The Descendants of Nehemiah Hubble & Lucretia Welton AND published a corrections booklet to the book in 2005 AND have maintained updating the Corrections – yes, I suspect I am more certain of the facts of the family than you.No, you are correct that citing a publication as a source is not an infringement of copyright, however, we hobby genealogists also need to encourage a level of ethics in our use of material produced by others. I stand by the fact that your Marshall (Reynolds) Blythe is not blood related to the whole of the HUBBELL/HUBBLE/HUBBEL/HUBEL/HUBLE clan going back to Rock, England and therefore you should allow that research to be posted by those that do the research for that line.  That research is being done by the U.S. Hubbell Family Association and they also are always actively updating their information and that said, even I do not try to duplicate their work beyond entering the name only of the direct line back to Richard HUBBALL…

Barbara

I do understand Barbara’s concern over any errors in another researcher’s data, but I object completely to the idea that because one individual started to research a line first, they own that lineage.

I finally stopped responding and was relieved she had ceased emailing me, thinking the whole thing was over. Then I read a post on Dick Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter regarding ‘discouragement of newbie genealogy researchers’ and commented about my own position on including unsourced information. Unfortunately, this newsletter site has been redesigned and no longer goes back that far in its archives, so I can’t quote from it directly.

The same day, there was a reply from Barbara repeating her opinion about ownership and rights to genealogy research, and making a direct slam to me without naming me (and I paraphrase): “a database of 115,000 individuals does not a genealogist make.” Now, I know this was the same woman because she had previously referred to my database of 115,000 being impossible to accumulate.

Incident #2

Gravestone of Evan Dhu Shelby
Tombstone of Evan Dhu Shelby.

The second incident occurred much more recently in response to a post on this site regarding Evan Isaac Shelby, in which much was recounted about his ancestor Evan (Dhu) Shelby, the pioneering immigrant from Wales to Pennsylvania. There has been a lot of controversy over whether the nickname ‘Dhu’ was ever used as it is only recorded as being associated with this individual in anecdotal evidence of the period. However, a later ancestor was also known as Evan Dhu Shelby, as is clearly stated on his tombstone (see right).

A gentleman commented on the post,

THERE IS NO EVAN DHU SHELBY, only Evan Shelby

Back around 1903 someone made application to the DAR and picked up the ‘dhu’ and used it in their application(s).

The use of Dhu first appeared in an early book by Armstrong in which he provides no basis for the use. I suspect he picked it up by mistake from a poem by Alexander McLachlan “In memory of Sir Ewen Cameron of Lochiel, 1629 -1719″. This is a poem that pays tribute to a Scotsman who went by “Evan Dhu” http://www.scotland.com/forums/poets-corner/22981-death-evan-dhu.html

Later Janet Schonert wrote a book “Chasin Shelbys” and continued using “dhu” as a middle name in error.

ALL of the researchers who have made the pilgrimage to St. Carron’s church in Wales and have looked at the ACTUAL baptismal records of Evan Shelby(see below) have confirmed that Evan had NO middle name, further, other than the DAR, which has no basis for the use of dhu, Alexander’s mistake, and Schonert who has perpetuated it, no other researcher or author has found any evidence to support its’ use.

The two premier Shelby authorities, Cass Knight Shelby, and Johnnie Mulinax Johnson, along with Shelby document historian Judith Trolinger have debunked the use of Dhu.

Over the years I have tried to educate as many Shelby researchers with the facts, but once the cow is out of the barn….

For you serious Shelby researchers here’s a partial list of Shelby research sources: (and yes, I’ve included those that use “dhu” ….sigh)

_______

1. Notable Southern Families, Armstrong, Zella, 1918, 273pgs. http://archive.org/details/notablesouthern00frengoog

2. A Report on the First Three Generations of the Shelby Family in the United States of America – by Shelby, Cass K.”, 1927, 26pgs. http://www.ancestralbooks.com/Shelby.html

3. Sketches of the Shelby, McDowell, Deaderick, Anderson families, Moon, Anna Mary, 1933, 150pgs. http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=wu.89066319427;view=1u

4. The Shelby family: ancestry and descendants of John Shelby and his son David Shelby ; pioneers of Tennessee, Galloway, Howard S. 1964, 352pgs

5. Chasin’ Shelby’s [sic] : a basic outline of the descendants of Jonathon, Jacob, Rees Shelby, Schonert, Janet D, 1971, 109pgs

6. Our ancestors and kinsmen: the Shelbys, Polks, McLartys, Perkersons, Tarpleys, and Camps, Camp Max W. , 1976, 128pgs

7. Our Shelbys, Johnson, Johnnie Mullinax, 1991, 209pgs

8. Rees and Mary Shelby: ancestors & descendants, Johnson, Johnnie Mullinax, 1994, 510pgs. (This book is THE Gold Standard, most exhaustive and best researched for Phillip Selby/Shelby’s line)

Now, I don’t have any issue with the above comments as they are succinct, illustrating his reasons for believing the name Dhu is inaccurate, but I responded with my reasons for choosing to leave the nickname Dhu in the database while explaining the controversy surrounding the name in the notes.

My response included:

Anything entered in my database that is not supported by a source is described as such. Where ‘family stories’ are unsubstantiated, they are identified as such. I clearly identify all my sources and unfortunately, if I have a document source, it takes precedence over word of mouth evidence that is anything but first party…

Only to receive a response back from him:

“I would love to see any documentary source that contradicts the information I’ve already sourced. The information I have that is not sourced and disagrees with the information you’ve provided will be changed.”

How can I prove a negative ?

There IS no document that supports/proves that Evan had “Dhu” as a middle name.

On the other hand, Evan’s ACTUAL baptismal/christening documents at St. Caron’s church, transcribed in Judy Trolinger’s notes that I provided are indeed PROOF of his real name. (See posst by Jef SHELBY at Genforum and Ancestry as he too has inspected the ACTUAL documents from the 1700′s).

Still believing that the absense of a name on a birth certificate is not definitive proof that it was not used, I responded again:

I have only ever referred to ‘Dhu’ in brackets or quotes in my database as a nickname, which he most likely would have come by at a later age. I do use this as it is mentioned in documentary sources I have found, which include Sons of the American Revolution applications and biographical documents, among others.

I then believed this debate to be concluded until I came upon this thread of comments to a post I made on the rootsweb.com site, in which I directed readers to the data, images and sources I had made available.

The first comment was from a different person and he states:

…”Evan Shelby DID NOT HAVE A MIDDLE NAME OF DHU!. A very early researcher threw that one in- It simply means ‘black’ in Galic (sic)”…

The gentleman who had responded to the post on my genealogy blog then responded:

…I have tried repeatedly to help this researcher/historian repeal her use of “dhu”…. …I have posted what I believe to be exhaustive and logical support as to why Evan did not have Dhu as a middle name at https://www.emptynestgenealogy.com/evan-dhu-isaac-shelby-of-tr… for those reading this post…

The response to him from the first commenter was:

“Dhu” (?) =s DUH!!!

Then there was a response back to him:

Really ? I thought its’ use was DHUmb

At this point, I was seeing ‘red’ and posted the following response:

I’m so disappointed in how rude some (very few mind you) researchers are. This gentleman has refused to accept the fact that I have a difference of opinion on this matter.

I have every right to disagree with Judy Trolinger, as much as her research has been helpful to me and numerous others (and with him) because there is at least one written account of the use the name ‘Dhu’ and since it’s documented as having been used by a later Evan Shelby (I have an image of it on a tombstone), it’s not inconceivable that it was used with this earlier Evan and carried on through the family. This would be considered a ‘nickname’ and would not be documented on a birth record, which is this researcher’s rationale for my being wrong. I may very well be wrong, but since there is some anectodal evidence of its use, I prefer to keep it until proven otherwise. If he would bother to check further, he would find the image of the tombstone documenting the nickname ‘Dhu’ in my database.

There is nothing ‘DHU’mb about my conclusions. As long as I make it clear why I make them in my research, which I do on the main website and his entry in the database site at https://www.emptynestgenealogy.com/blythegenealogygetperson.php?personID=I2634&….

Now, I do apologize that this post has been so long-winded, but I wanted to depict accurately what happened in both these incidents.

As far as I’m concerned, there is no room in genealogy for kingdomship, lack of civility, and harassment as a result of differing points of view.

I am so thankful that the vast majority of genealogy researchers I’ve dealt with have been pleasant, helpful and led to some relationships with other researchers through my blog and database site.

Please do let me know if you find any erroneous information in my database, but please do include a source or a link to a source as support for me to change my information. I appreciate any help I can get.

photo credit: brainpop_uk via photopin cc

Newfoundland and Labrador are the gems of Canada.

Melanson Village Community Hall
Melanson Village Community Hall

Mark is scared to death.

As we get closer to retirement, I’ve been focusing on possible places we could retire to. Unfortunately, unless something drastic changes, it isn’t likely we’ll be able to afford to stay in British Columbia, where the average home price in our area is $375,000.

This is not what Mark wants to hear. His family has lived in Chilliwack, British Columbia since the 1930’s after his grandmother sold the family farm on the Saskatchewan prairie.

I always thought like Mark. Having spent most of my life in British Columbia among the mountains, I never could foresee living elsewhere – until 2005 when we traveled to Nova Scotia and New Brunswick to research my mother’s Melanson, Acadian family history.

New Brunswick was pretty in its own way and it was great seeing it as we drove through, but there was something primal tugging at me in Nova Scotia. Each of the Acadian sites we visited tugged at me more and more.

Melanson Mountain Sign
Melanson Mountain directional sign.

I had this strange feeling of ‘welcome home’, which was bolstered by the odd coincidences we experienced, the people we met and the places we discovered. One of the weird coincidences was my being disappointed in how little there was in my family’s pioneer ‘Melanson Settlement’ site.

All my life I’d heard my mother talk about the dike systems devised by the Acadians to drain the land on the ocean front and create some of the most fertile farmland anywhere. We were never able to find an example of the aboiteau (dike valves) that were used – not at Grand Pré museum, nor at the Melanson Settlement site or anywhere else. Yet, that very day, on our way after seeing the Melanson Settlement and being very disappointed, we happened upon a non-descript little house with a sign out front, “North Hills Museum.” We decided to stop and check it out. It seemed like the usual home refurbished to look as it had centuries before with period furnishings, art, utensils, dishware, etc. We did, however, strike up a conversation with the woman working there and upon mentioning our disappointment in the Melanson Settlement and not being able to find an aboiteau, she said, “We have an aboiteau stored here, ready to be archived and put on display.” I couldn’t believe it and my mind raced as she led us to a back barn being used as a storage shed – and there was the aboiteau. From one angle it looked like  a log, but looking up from the open end, the valve could be seen and it was easy to imagine it in operation. This and other odd coincidences such as the graveyard tour at Fort Anne being led by Alan Melanson, another direct Melanson descendant, led to my feeling like we were expected and welcomed.

Since this trip to Nova Scotia and my resulting love of the area, I’ve been checking out properties there and have seen some amazing, waterfront acreages with heritage homes for $100,000 or less. This would be ideal for our retirement budget. Every time I show Mark one of these, I can see the panic in his eyes.

Over the last few years, I’ve been noticing the wonderfully charming, quaint commercials being produced by Newfoundland and Labrador Tourism. Each time, I feel so sorry that we never ventured that far while visiting the east coast on our genealogical quest. There’s something about the charm and hominess of these ads that invokes the same kind of ‘Welcome Home’ feeling and I mentioned to Mark that it might be smart to consider retiring there as well. The bonus there is that the rugged waterfront, high cliffs and jagged rocks are somewhat reminiscent of our Rocky Mountains in British Columbia. Again, I immediately saw panic in Mark’s eyes.

After this experience, I truly believe there is an innate tie between us and the homeland of our ancestors. I’d never seen Nova Scotia before and have no explanation for the deep draw and connection I experienced.

I still wonder at the ads produced by Newfoundland and Labrador tourism and have placed the videos of my favorites below.

Newfoundland and Labrador Tourism Videos

Iceberg Alley

Secret Place

Most Easterly Point

Gros Morne

Conversation

Vikings

Architecture

Place Names

The Edge

Access to FBI files is possible with GetGrandpasFBIFile.com

InvestigationEver wondered how you can get information about a family member who my have been investigated in the past? A new website for accessing federal investigation files called GetGrandpasFBIFile.com can now help – at least with federal investigations.

No matter what the reason for the investigation is, major crime, murder, smuggling, you can search.

There is bad news however. These files will only be available for a finite period of time as only a small portion of these files will be preserved at the National Archives. The rest will be destroyed in the interest of saving space.

Files on living people will be provided with written permission.

I visited the GetGrandpasFBIFile.com site and placed a request for the file of an ancestor of ours, William Read Kirk, who was last known to be an inmate in the Ohio State Penitentiary at the time of the 1930 fire. Once I got into the site, I was asked to complete the form with contact information and mailing address and stipulate a maximum I will pay in fees if the quantity of pages exceeds the initial 100 free pages. After clicking next, I was taken to a new screen to view the letter completed using the information I had input. Finally, the letter was forwarded on my behalf to the FBI. They state it can take anywhere from one week to ten days to get a response.

In addition to GetGrandpasFBIFile.com, another site called GetMyFBIFile.com already exists to assist with getting one’s own FBI information, as well as records from the US Secret Service, US Marshals Service, Defense Security and Army Criminal Investigation Command.

Thousands of wills online, including Shakespeare, Austen and Drake.

I was so excited to hear the news that thousands of wills are now online by Ancestry.co.uk. Among the wills published are those of famous and noted individuals including William Shakespeare, Jane Austen, and Sir Francis Drake.

Thousands of wills are now online.
Thousands of wills now online.

According to Ancestry.co.uk’s news site, “We’ve just added the most important collection of wills for England and Wales from before 1858 proved by the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. It’s packed with wills from members of the old middle and upper classes and paints a rich picture of life at that time.”

Richard Chatterton Will
Thousands of wills now online.

Of all of the source documents I’ve worked with, my favorite are wills. I love the look of the beautiful scripts used throughout history and thoroughly enjoy the challenge of transcribing them as accurately as possible. I find that wills are the most information and ‘colorful’ documents. Yes, yes, I know they’re pen and ink and ‘black and white’ in reality, but what I mean by ‘colorful’ is that they provide the details of the lives of the persons involved. It’s never just dates, locations, etc. Wills provide the prologue, main story and epilogue of an individual’s life and introduces us to their family and sometimes friends. We learn details of financial circumstances, social standing, property owned, and best of all, their relationships, whether good or bad.

Once we have come to understand the contents of a will, we know more of their life story. Although they are only accessible through paid subscription, Ancestry.co.uk offers a 14 day trial period for users to check it out before committing to a full subscription.

How to Apply for a Métis Status Card

Symbols of MetisTo apply for a Métis Status Card (aka Aboriginal Status card, Indian Status card), first you need to get the required information to prove your native ancestors. If you’re wondering about who qualifies for Métis Status, generally anyone with Native ancestors is biologically Métis. Which card you have depends on who your ancestors were.

Usually this means you need to start with yourself, and work backward through your family tree. You cannot randomly pick out a native american you were told “you might be related to” and try to match your tree with that person. This is why it can take some time to get your tree together and time to find a native ancestral line.

Start by making a family tree chart. Every person on the chart has 2 parents, so they become like branches in the tree (you can find blank tree charts online). Write your name and birthdate as the first person, then add your parents as branches in the next column, then their parents in the next column, etc., with each generation in a separate column. Add the birthdates and marriage dates for each generation. Eventually you will need to search archival records or church records for previous generations, but always work backward in time, verifying ancestors as you go.

If and when you do find your native ancestors, you will need to get copies of all records linking each generation back along that line, because most organizations do not do this for you without charging a fee, as it is so time-consuming. Métis organizations are not funded by government to find your native ancestors and prove that line. It is up to you to prove to them who you are. Some organizations will not verify your line at all, and will simply refuse membership.

For yourself, you need a birth or baptism record that states who your parents were. Then for every person along that line, you will need a record that states who their parents were. Usually this is referred to as a “long form” record, because it provides proof of parents’ names. Because some families have multiple persons with the same name, the only way to know for sure whether each person is completely documented is to have both the birth and marriage records that state parents’ names. You will need records like this for each generation going back to your native ancestor. Names and dates obtained from regular internet sites or family trees are not considered proof. You need to get copies of the government or church records, or other legal documents, either online or from that agency.

Once you have copies of all the actual records to prove your native line (without any unproven gaps in the line), you need to find out which Métis organization best fits your ancestry, and will represent you as a member of their Métis community.

Métis organizations have different requirements, objectives, and offer different kinds of representation. They are not usually affiliated with each other and do not share the same membership information. They also offer varying services for the application fee. Some only give aboriginal status cards, others offer programs and services. If you are interested in having help with your tree and also knowing the results of whatever is found, you should ask the organization about this service, what it will cost, and what you will get for your money, as some provide your tree information and others don’t.

Before applying, you might want to speak to their representatives or employees personally, to help determine the likelihood of being accepted into their community, and whether you feel their community best represents you and your ancestry. Some organizations may deny you status if you don’t have a specific type of proof, so you don’t want to find out that you have paid an application fee only to be turned down, then have to pay another organization to apply to their registry. Conversely, other organizations may seem to require very little proof.

Either way, a solid Métis community registry should contain documented proof of every generation, from your baptism or birth record to your native ancestor, without gaps. If you only have your standard issued birth certificate that does not state your parents’ names, then you need to either get your baptism record from your church or your “long form” birth certificate, which is available from the government, and send in copies to the organization. You will also need this same kind of document for each generation. This is the only way a registry can prove that all of its members are actually descended from Native Americans. The amount of funding an organization gets will depend on the number of registrants who have complete documentation, and whether your organization is prepared to negotiate funding on your behalf.

Once you have decided which group to apply to and have got your paperwork in order, you are ready to apply for your Métis Card.

Go to the organization’s website, and download the Métis Status Card Application Form. Fill out one application per person. Add your documented proof either by supplying copies (never send actual records), or scan them as computer files.

Include the required photo, and sign the application. Either mail the package or send it by email with payment for processing (never send cash in the mail).

Check periodically to see if your application will likely be processed soon. Some organizations take over a year to process so you shouldn’t wait until the last minute. Once you have your status, you can let others in the family and community know how to apply for Métis Status Cards too!

Article Source:

Article Source:

Why would a typist and transcriptionist want to spend her leisure years typing and transcribing?

The answer?

I’m a genealogy fanatic and typing and transcription are a very large portion of the workload necessary to conduct research, handle sources and documents, and transcribe images of documents into editable text to make it searchable. Although I made the majority of my living as a business owner and Administrative Assistant using these necessary skills, I find I’m using them just as much if not more in my quest for my family’s history and heritage.

I’ve looked into dictation transcription services in case I find a need for them and can afford them one day to ease my workload when (knock on wood) my blogs really take off. The majority of the sites I looked at offered basic transcription services without specialization, but I couldn’t believe the wide range of services offered by Daily Transcription Services.

Their areas of expertise include:

  • Academic: Thesis, lectures, speeches, student services, focus groups and interviews.
  • Corporate: Business meetings, data entry, conference calls, dictation, market research, video conferencing and voice to text.
  • Closed Captioning: Multimedia captions, foreign captions and pop up and  roll up captions.
  • Legal Services: Forensic transcription, depositions, court reporting, etc.
  • Post Production: Full range of post production services including clean and actual verbatum, and transcription from both good and difficult audio sources.
  • Transcription Services: Audio and video transcription, podcasts, dictation, voice to text and webcaption transcription services.
  • Language Services: Dubbing, translation, caption, and lip sync services in numerous languages.
  • Writing Services: Writers experience in television, film, journalism and film offer screenplay and script services and formatting, as well as ghost writing.

I have never seen a company offer such  a broad range of services at a variety of skill levels before. Perhaps, if I ever tire of genealogy and decide to make extra money for our retirement, I could apply to this company?

I don’t know if I ever could or would give up my genealogy as there’s always a new mystery to be solved and new questions to be answered.

photo credit: alanclarkdesign via photopin cc

Richard 3rd’s facial reconstruction illustrates show family traits can span generations.

A while ago, I watched with great interest the progress of the effort to positively identify the remains found in a Leicester parking lot as those of Richard III, as described in a past post.
News was later released that a Richard 3rd’s facial reconstruction was done from his skull and a photo was published on News Leicester next to that of his 17th generation nephew, Michael Ibsen.

Marsh Blythe: Richard 3rd's facial reconstruction illustrates show family traits can span generations.

Portrait of Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky.

I hope it’s not just me, but I can see a familial resemblance and wonder if the likeness of Michael Ibsen had any bearing on the artist’s rendering, or if it was indeed solely based on the skull. If it is only based on Richard III’s skull, the resemblance is quite striking.

In an earlier post, I posted images of, and described the remarkable resemblance between my father-in-law (see right) and Isaac Shelby, nephew of my father-in-law’s seventh great grandfather (see above left), Governor of Kentucky and hero of the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812.

I only wish I could one day compare these images with images of the original Shelby family immigrant, Evan (Dhu) Isaac Shelby (direct ancestor to both).

In another instance I had conducted research into a family friend’s background with the story surrounding the mysterious ‘aunt’ of another ancestor in mind. This aunt had always intrigued the family as they never knew much about her.

My research led me to the story of a young, single girl working as a domestic in the home of a wealthy business man, and soon becoming pregnant and bearing an illegitimate child. This girl turned out to be the mysterious aunt, only the ancestor, although believing she was an aunt, never learned she was actually her mother.

I wondered if this ‘aunt’ had become pregnant by her employer as there were no other males of an age to be candidates in the household. I managed to locate photos of a second generation descendant and his son who still owned and operated the family business. Upon comparison, I could see a definite likeness, although not quite as marked as in the two examples above. This likeness strengthened my belief that my conjecture was correct.

Without documentary proof of any kind and with no possibility of DNA testing, this is the best I can do.

It’s truly amazing to me how similar and consistent family traits can remain over the generations.

DNA results: Leicester parking lot remains are those of Richard 3rd.

DNA lab testThe remains found under a parking lot in Leicester are indeed those of Richard III.

The identity was confirmed by tests conducted comparing DNA from the remains and those of Richard III’s nearest living relative, Michael Ibsen, a Canadian who descends directly from Richard III’s sister Anne.

Richard III is 1st cousin, 24 times removed to my children, who directly descend from Richard III’s uncle and brother to Richard III’s mother Cecily de Neville, Richard de Neville, Earl of Salisbury.

After Richard III died in a battle at Bosworth Field, Henry VII, the victor, put his body on display, afterward burying him in Grey Friars monastery. The monastery having later been destroyed, the location of Richard III’s burial remained a mystery thereafter – until now.

With the support of donations to the Richard III Society, research led to the parking lot in Leicester where the remains were discovered. The skeleton will be reburied at Leicester Cathedral and a tomb erected in his honor.

It’s amazing to realize how much DNA has opened up the world to us – both past and present. Through DNA, we can answer questions we once thought impossible to answer.

Now I’m seriously thinking of looking into DNA testing for myself and my husband to confirm relationships proven as much as possible through research alone. DNA could be the ultimate tool to resolve those brick walls where we believe in a relationship but can find no definitive proof.

Bones unearthed could be those of Richard III, King of England.

, 1st cousin 24 times removed to my children, was King of England from 1483 to 1485, yet is most widely known in our time as the scandalous title character of the play ‘Richard III’ by William Shakespeare. His reign ended upon his death in the Battle of Bosworth Field.

Richard’s checkered past before becoming King included becoming Duke of Gloucester on November 1, 1461. He was then appointed Admiral of England, Ireland and Aquitaine on October 12, 1462 and made Constable of England October 17, 1469. Besides suspicion over the disappearance of the princes, his reputation as a scoundrel was cemented by suspicion of his participation in the murder of Edward Prince of Wales, whose widow he married, as well as becoming Great Chamberlain of England in succession to his brother George, Duke of Clarence on February 21, 1478, the same day he was murdered.

Upon the death of Richard’s brother Edward, Richard became Lord Protector of the Realm for the heir apparent, Edward’s 12 year old son King Edward V. Richard escorted Edward V to the Tower of London, where he was placed, to be joined later by his brother Richard. Before young King Edward was crowned, Edward IV’s marriage to the boys’ mother Elizabeth Woodville was declared invalid, illegitimizing the children, negating their claim to the throne and making Richard III the heir to the throne. Princes Edward and Richard disappeared and accusations soon arose that Richard had the boys killed.

Richard married (Westminster Abbey 12 Jul 1472) as her second husband, Anne Neville, widow of Edward, Prince of Wales, and daughter of Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick and Anne Beauchamp.

Accounts of the time describe Richard as having a condition of the spine causing his right shoulder to be considerably higher than his left. This condition is now widely believed to have been scoliosis, an exaggerated curvature of the spine that can be severe and debilitating.

Based on the accounts of Richard’s physical disability and the fatal injuries he sustained in the battle now lead archaelogists to believe they have unearthed the grave of Richard III.

This grave existed under a parking lot on the grounds originally belonging to Greyfriars Abbey in Leicester, the church where Richard was supposedly buried. The bones show evidence of similar wounds and a spinal condition similar to what has been described. As optimistic as archaelogists are, they are seeking to prove his identity by performing a DNA test on a living, direct ancestor to Richard’s sister.

I’m hoping there will be some way the DNA information from this testing will be made available for others like my husband and children to compare to in an effort to prove our own connection.

Sources:

  1. Foundation for Medieval Genealogy; http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#_Toc321390527
  2. Wikipedia.org; http://www.wikipedia.org
  3. Kings and Queens of England – The Plantagenets, The Royal Family online; http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page58.asp.
  4. Kings and Queens of England – The Yorkists, The Royal Family online; http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page47.asp.

 

 

DNA Solved Mystery for the Child of the Last US Soldier Killed in Vietnam

On Friday, the family of John O’Neal Rucker gathered with Tia McConnell and her husband Allan and their two boys Matthew and Quentin at the Veterans’ Memorial at Linden’s courthouse to honor her newly discovered father.

Tia had been an orphan in Da Nang, and was adopted by Karen and Jack Whittier of Colorado after being evacuated from Vietnam. After a lengthy and problematic search for her birth family, Tia discovered that John Rucker was her father.

She honored her father with placement of a flag at the monument that recognized him as the last American soldier to die in Vietnam. Rucker had been a member of 366 Combat Support Group, 366th Tactical Fighter Wing during the Vietnam War, and was the last American soldier to die in Vietnam, having been killed by a rocket attack on January 27, 1973. Sadly, this attack and John’s subsequent death occurred only hours before the Paris Peace Accords were signed, ending the Vietnam War.

Mae Rucker, John’s mother, had met Tia and her family the day before, after Tia’s search led to John and DNA testing proved the connection. Despite a negative first test in comparison to John’s mother, they persevered and had another test done to confirm the result. This time her DNA was compared with John’s two sisters and the tests were positive, indicating a 91 percent match, which is impossible unless the parties are closely related.

This story has finally convinced Mark and I to get our DNA tested. It’s something I’ve been considering for quite a while now, but I’ve been hesitant because I wasn’t sure I trusted the process enough yet.

Mark and I want to test our DNA rather than our children’s because we feel it would allow us to maintain separation of the data from our two different branches. I’m curious to find if my suspicions are correct and there are commonalities between the two branches.

I’ll post later about the process and results.

Grand Pré is Recognized by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site

As a Canadian, and someone who has been proudly vocal about my Acadian heritage, this was such exciting news.

The announcement was made June 30, 2012 – the day before Canada Day. What a way to celebrate!

Transcription: Acadia, Canada Vital Records (Drouin Collection) 1670-1946.

UNESCO said, “the landscape of Grand Pré encompasses cultural characteristics that are so exceptional they are of importance to present and future generations of all humanity.”

The official designation follows years of dedication and hard work by the community, including Acadians, farmers, local officials, the Mi’kmaq people and the Government of Canada.

Memorial at Grand Pré
Acadian Memorial at Grand Pré.

Grand Pré (literal translation ‘large meadow’) is located at Minas Basin in Nova Scotia, Canada. It was settled by Pierre Melanson, son of the original French immigrants Pierre dit Laverdure and his wife Priscilla Mellanson, and brother to my 8th great grandfather, Charles Melanson. Pierre had relocated to Minas Basin with his family to escape the conflict that was all too frequent at Port Royal.

About 1713, the Acadians living under British rule were subsequently asked to take an oath of allegiance to the British King. Many were not happy with this request and refused to sign, for the most part because they did not want to be forced to take arms against the Mi’kmaq or the French – their own people.

After being promised they would not be forced to take up arms, most Acadians signed a conditional oath in 1730.

When conflict once again arose between England and France in 1744, Halifax became the new capital of the British colony in 1749. Unfortunately, the largest part of the population in Halifax were Acadians, who lived on and farmed the richest farmland in the area.

Grand Pré Chapel
A very old willow on the grounds of Grand Pré Chapel, a descendant of one of the ancient willows that witnessed the sad events of that time.

Wanting to encourage more Protestants to come and settle in the area, personal property and arms were confiscated and many French settlers were captured and imprisoned. Finally, in 1755, the decision was made to expel the Acadians from Nova Scotia.

On August 19, 1755, British troops made the chapel at Grand Pré their headquarters. The Acadian men and boys were ordered to meet there on September 5th, where they were informed them that their personal property was forfeit to the Crown and they and their families would be deported.

This action, treacherous as it was, served the British King well as it left the prime farmlands available for the British Protestants to claim, and virtually eliminated conflict with the French.

Many Acadians escaped to the wilderness as far away as Quebec and lived and survived with the assistance of the Mi’kmaq. Several thousand Acadians that remained were deported to other points including South Carolina, Pennsylvania, Georgia, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, and North and South Carolina. Many families were separated and there were numerous deaths from disease and ship wrecks.

While on a driving tour in Nova Scotia in 2005, we visited Grand Pré and I must say, I’ve never felt anything like the feeling I felt there. It was a glorious sunny day with a slight warm breeze blowing as we walked about the grounds. I felt an intrinsic, deep-rooted sadness and feeling of being ‘home’. I can’t explain it really, I just know how it felt.

Erin and Stuart fell in love with the resident cat in the chapel. Once they picked it up, it snuggled in as close as it could get. So cute.

Erin and kitty in Grand Pré.
Erin holding the resident cat in the Grand Pré chapel.
Stu in the Grand Pré chapel.
Stu holding the resident cat in the Grand Pré chapel.

Hilarious history: From Napoléon’s petit package to Pythagoras’ fear of farts | Ancient Origins

History is often presented in grey, rather dry terms, but when you do a bit of digging, our past is full of remarkable people who had wicked senses of humor and died with as much vigor as they lived.

In this article we will look at some of the most prominent people and funny events in history, where you just have to laugh.

Plea For A Pilgrim’s Pint

The Pilgrims were the first English settlers of the Plymouth Colony in present-day Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States. It has been said that the first thing said to the Pilgrims by the Native American Samoset, was specifically: “Do you have any beer?” in perfect English.

European trade routes to North America had already existed for several generations and cod fishermen and trade diplomats had traveled extensively to the Americas from Europe.

Historical records back up the fact that Samoset was the first Native American to greet the pilgrims and the possibility that he requested a cold beer is actually supported by most specialists.

Read on . . .

Source: Monumentally Funny Events in History: From Napoléon’s Petit Package to Pythagoras’ Fear of Farts | Ancient Origins

Transcription: US WWII Draft Registration Card for Albert Rascher

Transcription: US WWII Draft Registration Card for Albert Rascher.

Albert Rascher WWII Draft Card
Albert Rascher WWII Draft Card

REGISTRATION CARD — (Men born on or after April 28, 1877 and on or before February 16, 1897)

Line 1
SERIAL NUMBER: U827
NAME: Albert Rascher
ORDER NUMBER:

Line 2
PLACE OF RESIDENCE: R.F.D. No. 1 – Arlington Heights Cook Illinois
(The place of residence given on the line above will determine local board jurisdiction; line 2 of registration certificate will be identical)

Line 3
MAILING ADDRESS: Same
(Mailing address if other than line 2. If same, insert word same)

Line 4
TELEPHONE: None

Line 5
AGE IN YEARS: 47; DATE OF BIRTH: August – 14 – 1894

Line 6
PLACE OF BIRTH: Palatine Illinois

Line 7
NAME AND ADDRESS OF PERSON WHO WILL ALWAYS KNOW YOUR ADDRESS: Mrs. Meta Rascher, Same

Line 8
EMPLOYER’S NAME AND ADDRESS: Roselle Country Club

Line 9
PLACE OF EMPLOYMENT OR BUSINESS: Roselle – Illinois  Cook
(Number and street or R. F. D. number) (Town) (State)

I AFFIRM THAT I HAVE VERIFIED ABOVE ANSWERS AND THAT THEY ARE TRUE.

D. S. S. FORM 1 16-21630-2    Albert Rascher
(Revised 4-1-42)      (over)        (Registrant’s Signature)

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

Sometimes it pays to look to the present for information about the past.

It’s amazing what information about the past including people and events can be found by searching through online newspapers, magazines, etc. – even if they are in a foreign language.

I’m routinely having to read, translate and understand documents written in their original language such as French, German, Swedish, and so on. My go to method for getting started is accessing ‘Google Translate’. To have a web page translated, just type the complete original language url in the Google search box, press ‘search’, find what you’re looking for in the search results list and click on ‘Translate this page’.

El Economista TranslatedOne such site I’ve recently accessed was ‘El Economista’ a Mexican, Spanish language online newspaper. On this particular day, the headlines were dominated by news of Javier Duarte de Ochoa and his handling of the crisis created by the recent tropical storm. Javier Duarte is the Governor of Veracruz, Mexico.

Above is a clip from the Google translated site mentioned and as you can see the text in the first paragraph is quite understandable, although not quite grammatically correct. I would always suggest finding independent confirmation elsewhere to confirm your understanding, if possible.

I routinely search through newspapers in the areas in which I’m researching and I have stumbled upon some real ‘gems’ related to my research, including a rooming house arson fire a recent ancestor escaped from, another ancestor whose name was published as a deserter in WWI, and most recently news of a tragic train crash in a community from which my own father’s French Canadian family originates. It was particularly heartbreaking to read the names of the deceased in the online French language news sites, and to recognize many of them as distant relatives.

Using Google translate  is also a useful tool if transcribing documents from their original language. Go to the main Google translate page, type the text in question in the left box, making sure it’s labeled with the correct language and click ‘Translate’. The English translation will appear to the right if English is the selected language. Text can be translated to and from numerous languages.

photo credit: Augie Schwer via photopin cc

Transcription: US WWII Draft Registration Card for Frank John Niles

US WWII Draft Registration Card for Frank John Niles.

U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942 of Frank Niles
U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942 of Frank Niles

 

REGISTRATION CARD — (Men born on or after April 28, 1877 and on or before February 16, 1897)

Line 1
SERIAL NUMBER: U1257
NAME: Frank John Niles
ORDER NUMBER:

Line 2
PLACE OF RESIDENCE: West Milton, Miami, Ohio
(The place of residence given on the line above will determine local board jurisdiction; line 2 of registration certificate will be identical)

Line 3
MAILING ADDRESS: Same
(Mailing address if other than line 2. If same, insert word same)

Line 4
TELEPHONE: None

Line 5
AGE IN YEARS: 57; DATE OF BIRTH: June 18, 1885

Line 6
PLACE OF BIRTH: West Milton, Ohio

Line 7
NAME AND ADDRESS OF PERSON WHO WILL ALWAYS KNOW YOUR ADDRESS: Bobbie Niles, West Milton, Ohio

Line 8
EMPLOYER’S NAME AND ADDRESS: Harry Sexhour, West Milton, O.

Line 9
PLACE OF EMPLOYMENT OR BUSINESS:   West Milton, Miami, Ohio
(Number and street or R. F. D. number)     (Town)     (State)

I AFFIRM THAT I HAVE VERIFIED ABOVE ANSWERS AND THAT THEY ARE TRUE.

D. S. S. FORM 1                         16-21630-2      Frank Niles
(Revised 4-1-42)     (over)                                   (Registrant’s Signature)

___________________

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Transcription: US WWII Draft Registration Card for John Croll MacPherson

Transcription of the US WWII Draft Registration Card for John Croll MacPherson.

WWII Draft Card for John MacPherson
WWII Draft Card for John MacPherson

REGISTRATION CARD — (Men born on or after April 28, 1877 and on or before February 16, 1897)

Line 1
SERIAL NUMBER: U1471
NAME: John Croll MacPherson
ORDER NUMBER:

Line 2
PLACE OF RESIDENCE: 3365 N. E. Alameda Str
(The place of residence given on the line above will determine local board jurisdiction; line 2 of registration certificate will be identical)

Line 3
MAILING ADDRESS: Same
(Mailing address if other than line 2. If same, insert word same)

Line 4
TELEPHONE:   Garfield 7070

Line 5
AGE IN YEARS:   56 yrs 1 mo;      DATE OF BIRTH:   April 7, 1886

Line 6
PLACE OF BIRTH: Aberdeen, Scotland

Line 7
NAME AND ADDRESS OF PERSON WHO WILL ALWAYS KNOW YOUR ADDRESS:   Hilda C. MacPherson, 3365 N. E. Alameda

Line 8
EMPLOYER’S NAME AND ADDRESS:   Self

Line 8
PLACE OF EMPLOYMENT OR BUSINESS:   42nd & Fremont
(Number and street or R. F. D. number)     (Town)     (State)

I AFFIRM THAT I HAVE VERIFIED ABOVE ANSWERS AND THAT THEY ARE TRUE.

D. S. S. FORM 1                         16-21630-2      John C. MacPherson
(Revised 4-1-42)     (over)                                    (Registrant’s Signature)

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.