All things history and genealogy.

All things history and genealogy.

Category: Culture

The ancestor quest: humor, poems and prose for Genealogists.

I have gathered and transcribed several items of humor, poems and prose for Genealogists that have touched me in some way. The ones I have selected and printed below are my favorites of the hundreds that can be found – and the ones that hit home the most.

__________

Dear Ancestor

 

Your tombstone stands among the rest;
Neglected and alone
The name and date are chiseled out
On polished, marbled stone.
It reaches out to all who care
It is too late to mourn.
You did not know that I exist
You died and I was born.
Yet each of us are cells of you
In flesh, in blood, in bone.
Our blood contracts and beats a pulse
Entirely not our own.
Dear Ancestor, the place you filled
So many years ago
Spreads out among the ones you left
Who would have loved you so.
I wonder if you lived and loved,
I wonder if you knew
That someday I would find this spot,
And come to visit you.

__________

 

 Genealogy – where you confuse the dead and irritate the living.

__________

 

Murphy’s Law for Genealogists

 

The public ceremony in which your distinguished ancestor participated and at which the platform collapsed under him turned out to be a hanging.

When at last after much hard work you have solved the mystery you have been working on for two years, your aunt says, “I could have told you that.”

You grandmother’s maiden name that you have searched for four years was on a letter in a box in the attic all the time.

You never asked your father about his family when he was alive because you weren’t interested in genealogy then.

The will you need is in the safe on board the Titanic.

Copies of old newspapers have holes occurring only on the surnames.

John, son of Thomas, the immigrant whom your relatives claim as the family progenitor, died on board ship at
age 10.

Your gr. grandfather’s newspaper obituary states that he died leaving no issue of record.

The keeper of the vital records you need has just been insulted by an another genealogist.

The relative who had all the family photographs gave them all to her daughter who has no interest in genealogy and no inclination to share.

The only record you find for your gr. grandfather is that his property was sold at a sheriff’s sale for insolvency.

The one document that would supply the missing link in your dead-end line has been lost due to fire, flood or war.

The town clerk to whom you wrote for the information sends you a long handwritten letter which is totally illegible.

The spelling for your European ancestor’s name bears no relationship to its current spelling or pronunciation.

None of the pictures in your recently deceased grandmother’s photo album have names written on them.

No one in your family tree ever did anything noteworthy, owned property, was sued or was named in wills.

You learn that your great aunt’s executor just sold her life’s collection of family genealogical materials to a flea market dealer “somewhere in New York City.”

Ink fades and paper deteriorates at a rate inversely proportional to the value of the data recorded.

The 37 volume, sixteen thousand page history of your county of origin isn’t indexed.

You finally find your gr. grandparent’s wedding records and discover that the brides’ father was named John Smith.

__________

 

Whoever said “Seek and ye shall find” was not a genealogist.

__________

Strangers in the Box

 

Come, look with me inside this drawer,
In this box I’ve often seen,
At the pictures, black and white,
Faces proud, still, and serene.

I wish I knew the people,
These strangers in the box,
Their names and all their memories,
Are lost among my socks.

I wonder what their lives were like,
How did they spend their days?
What about their special times?
I’ll never know their ways.

If only someone had taken time,
To tell, who, what, where, and when,
These faces of my heritage,
Would come to life again.

Could this become the fate,
Of the pictures we take today?
The faces and the memories,
Someday to be passed away?

Take time to save your stories,
Seize the opportunity when it knocks,
Or someday you and yours,
Could be strangers in the box.

Originally posted 2016-04-26 10:17:36. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

William Thorne: Signer of the historic Flushing Remonstrance.

William Thorne, my children’s 10th great grandfather, was born March 7, 1616 to John (1580-1621) and Constance (1584-1617) Thorne in Dorset, England.

Although it is unclear whether the marriage occurred in England or Massachusetts, he married Sarah “Susannah” Booth (1608-1675) who married William Hallett after the death of her first husband William Thorne. Sometime between 1634 and 1638, he immigrated to America through the port of Boston, although it is unclear whether he arrived single, or newly married. They soon had the following children:

  • Joseph Thorne (1642-1727)
  • William Thorne Jr. (   –   )
  • Samuel Thorne Sr. (   –   )
  • John Thorne (1643-1707)
  • Susannah Thorne (   –   )

We know William Thorne is listed in the US and Canada, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index of 1500 to 1900 as having immigrated to Boston in 1638. He was made a Freeman of the Massachusetts Bay Colony at Lynn, Massachusetts on May 2, 1638. Obtaining this position is a strong indicator that he was a Puritan of legal age, had some means, and was a trusted member of the community.

It is recorded that on June 29, 1641, William served as a member of a jury in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts, which was only 5 miles from Lynn.

He took his religious convictions very seriously and took an active role in the church. One such action was his part in the hiding and supporting of fellow patentee, Ann Marbury Hutchinson’s son Francis and her son-in-law William Collins. All were opposed to the Church of Boston. As a result of his actions, he was fined 6 2/3 pounds by the court.

Another action was his refusal to serve in the Military Watch, resulting in his being found guilty in a Salem, Essex County court of the infraction, on February 28, 1643.

Flushing Quakeer Friends' Meeting House and Burial Ground (in rear), built c. 1695.
Flushing Quaker Friends’ Meeting House and Burial Ground (in rear), built c. 1695.

He died in 1657 at the age of 41 in Jamaica, New York and was buried in the Flushing Quaker Meeting Burial Grounds in Flushing, Queens, New York. By this time, however, he had already left Boston, moving to Sandwich in the Plymouth Colony, and eventually arriving in New Amsterdam to become one of the original patentees of the Patent at Gravesend in June 1643.

Flushing Quaker Meeting House Graveyard 4 Flushing Quaker Meeting House Graveyard 2 Flushing Quaker Meeting House Cemetery Flushing Quaker Meeting House and Graveyard

Flushing Quaker Meeting Graveyard.

In September of 1643, the Mohicans attacked Gravesend and William Thorne and the rest of the patentees beat off several successive attacks, killing several Mohicans. Sadly Anne Hutchinson and most of her family were murdered by the Mohicans.

The Governor finally ended the war with the Indians on August 30, 1645.

October 10, 1645, William Thorne and 16 other Englishmen were granted a Patent for a village at Flushing Creek, and the final Patent for Gravesend was granted to Thorne, et al. was granted by Governor Kieft.

March 21, 1656, William Thorne was granted Planters Lott at Jamaica, Long Island as a member of the second group of patentees.

On December 27, 1657 the Remonstrance of Flushing was drafted and William Thorne was the third to sign.

Tombstone: Samuel and Susanna Hallett.
Tombstone: Samuel and Susana Hallett.
Hallett, Samuel and Susana 2
Tombstone: Samuel and Susana Hallett.
Flushing Remonstrance, pg 1.
Flushing Remonstrance.
Thorne, William; Flushing Remonstrance, pg 2.
Signatures on the Flushing Remonstrance.

 

____________________

Source:

  1. U.S., New England Marriages Prior to 1700.” Database; Ancestry.com.
  2. “Find A Grave”, Grave Memorial;  :http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=8364605 .
  3. “Find A Grave”, Grave Memorials; http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=7855352 : .
  4. Middleton, Joseph and Taylor, Alan McLean; compilers; “Eight Generations from William Thorne”.
  5. “New Jersey Abstract of Wills”; New Jersey Colonial Documents; Page 480.

Originally posted 2015-12-22 18:52:56. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Transcription: The last Will and Testament of Hannah Stone

 

Last Will and Testament of Hannah Stone

 

Hannah

 

Stone

 

3

This is the last Will and testament of me Hannah Stone of Weymouth and Melcombe Regis in the County of Dorset ???? woman made this twenty fourth day of  April one thousand eight hundred and thirty four ffirst I direct my just debts ffuneral and testamentary expenses to be paid by my Executrix hereafter married And all the Rest Residue and Remainders of my household goods ffurniture linen cows cattle and all other my personal estate and effects what nature or kind ????? I give and do bequeath unto my daughter Ann Corney wife of William Corney of Weymouth aforesaid Sailmaker to and for her own use and benefit and I hereby appoint my said daughter sole Executrix of this my will and lastly I hereby revoke all wills codicils and other testamentary dispositions made by me at any time or times heretofore and do publish and declare this to be my last will and testament In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written The Mark and Seal of Hannah Stone ?? signed seales published and declared by the said Hannah Stone the Executrix as and for her last Will and Testament in the presence of us who in her presence at her request and in the presence of each other have subscribed our names as witnesses thereto Fred Chas. Sleggatt S??  Weymouth Thos. Corrall
Proved at London 15th October 1835 before the judge by the oath… (remainder missing)

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

Originally posted 2015-12-03 17:09:54. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Mark Blythe to Barack Obama Relationship Chart

 

The relationship chart illustrating the multi-generational, multi-cultural, multi-racial connections between Barack Obama and my husband Mark Blythe.

 

A while ago, we saw a genealogy chart in a Chicago newspaper online showing Barack Obama’s family tree, which includes one Ulrich Stehle (Steely), born about 1720 and died before 1773, living the entire time in Pennsylvania.

The connection is through Barack’s maternal line from his mother Stanley Ann Dunham and Mark’s paternal line.

We later discovered that Barack Obama and Mark are both related to John Bunch, the first documented slave in America, as described in a previous post.

Mark Blythe to Barack Obama Relationship Chart
Mark Blythe to Barack Obama Relationship Chart

Originally posted 2016-10-26 05:37:38. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Police can request your DNA from sites like Ancestry, 23andMe.

 

Millions of people have handed their DNA over to genetic testing companies like Ancestry or 23andMe to learn more about their family history.

Eric Yarham wanted to learn about his heritage, so he mailed off his saliva to 23andMe.

“I’m just trying to unravel the mystery that is your genetics,” said Yarham.

 

Yarham was surprised to find a tiny portion of his DNA profile can be traced back to sub-Saharan Africa. He was also unaware that his genetic information could end up in the hands of police.

“The police make mistakes and I would rather not be on the unfortunate end of one of those mistakes, as a result of my DNA being somewhere that is unlucky,” Yarham said.

Both 23andMe and Ancestry confirm your DNA profile could be disclosed to law enforcement if they have a warrant.

23andMe Privacy Officer Kate Black said, “We try to make information available on the website in various forms, so through Frequently Asked Questions, through information in our privacy center.”

According to the company’s self-reported data, law enforcement has requested information for five American 23andMe customers since it began offering home test kits more than a decade ago.

23andMe’s website states, “In each of these cases, 23andMe successfully resisted the request and protected our customers’ data from release to law enforcement.”

Black said she wouldn’t entirely rule it out in the future. “We would always review a request and take it on a case-by-case basis,” Black said.

Read on . . .

 

Source: Police can request your DNA from sites like Ancestry, 23andMe

Originally posted 2018-01-12 11:48:03. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

My favorite and most used US genealogy research links.

 

The following is my extensive list of my favorite and most used US genealogy research links. Although the vast majority of these are free, there are a few paid sites included that I do subscribe to – simply because I find them invaluable.

 

Originally posted 2016-06-23 15:39:29. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Transcription: War of 1812 US Army Register of Enlistments; Adams

 

The following text is my transcription of the War of 1812 US Army Register of Enlistments, 1798-1914, listing some with the surname of Adams.

 

US Army Register of Enlistments, 1798-1914, Page 4, 'A's.
US Army Register of Enlistments, 1798-1914, Page 4.

51:  Adams, Abijah, Private

Organization:  30 US Infy; Captain Spencer; Col. Elias Fasset

Description:  5’10” or 5’9”; blue eyes; brown hair; dark complexion

Age: 28 or 20

Occupation:  Farmer

Birth Place:  Killington or Killingsly, Windham Co., Conn.

Enlistment Date:  Apl 4 1814

Enlistment Place:  Addison or Bridport, Addison Co., Virginia

Enlisted By:  Lt. Myrick

Enlistment Period:  War

Remarks:  D.R. Burlington, Vt. May 31st 1814, M.R. June 30/14, present, Capt. Wm Millers Co. Book 1813 to 1815. Present Dec. 1814 – D.R. Feby 16, JR Burlington, Feby 28, April 30 M.R. June-1815. Present – Certif. dated Plattsburgh, June 15 1815 – Book 555 – Discharged at Plattsburgh or Champlain Station, June 15 1815, term expiered. – See Pension Case.

52:  Adams, Abner, Recruit

Organization:  Recruit; US Arty

Description:  5’10”

Age:  21

Occupation:  ?

Birth Place:  Pepperell Mass, Middlesex Co.

Enlistment Date:  Jun 14 1814

Enlistment Place:  Groton Mass

Enlisted By:  Lt. Hobart

Remarks:  R.R. June  – 1814 –

53:  Adams, Abraham or Abram, Private

Organization:  5 US Regt

Description:  6’2”; blue eyes; dark hair;  fair complexion

Age:  22

Occupation:  Farmer or Carpenter

Birth Place:  Cheraw S.C. Dist

Enlistment Date:  Jul 8 1814

Enlistment Place:  Lancaster S.C.

Enlisted By:  Capt. R. Campbell

Enlistment Period:  5 years

Remarks:  R.R. July 30th 1814 – I.R. Capt. R. Campbell’s Co. Washington City, Feby 11/15, Absent at Bottom Bridge, Va – D.R. & I.R. Capt. Benj. Birdsall’s Co. Belle Fontaine, Dec. 30th 1815, I.R. Feby 29, April 30, June 30, Aug. 31, I.R. & S.A.M.R.. Dec. 31st 1817, & I.R. Feby 28 & April 30th. On command at Belle Fontaine – I.R. & S.A.M.R. Belle Fontaine, Mo. June 30th 1818, Present – sick in [gas] – I.R. Capt. J. McGunnigle’s Co. Aug. 31st 1818, Preseent – I.R. Oct. 31 & Dec. 31st 1818, On furlough – S.A.M.R. Capt. L. Gantt’s Co. Dec. 31st 1818, I.R. Feby 28 & April 20/19. On furlough – Mo. Ret. July 1819, Discharged, July 8th 1819. – Discharged at Franklin, Mo. [Ty], July 3/19, to take effect July 8/19, term expired – See Pension Case.

54:  Adams, Alanson, Private

Organization: 11th US Infy; Cols. Campbell, E.W. Ripley & Moody Bedel

Description:  5’11”;  blue eyes; brown hair; light complexion

Age:  21

Occupation:  Farmer

Birth Place:  Pittsfield Mass.

Enlistment Date:  Jany 28 1813

Enlistment Place:  Burlington Vt.

Enlisted By:  Capt. V.R. Goodrich

Enlistment Period:  Jany 27 1818

Remarks:  Capt. Sam’l Gordon’s Co Book 1813, Mustered in Co. from Lt. V.R. Goodrich’s Co. June 30/13 – M.R. Capt. V.R. Goodrich’s Co. Dec. 30th 1813, Feby 28 & S.A.M.R. June 30/14. Present – M.R. Aug. 30th 1814. In Gen’l Hosp’l, wounded July 25 or 26th 1814 – I.R. Capt. Jno. Bliss’ Co. Sackett’s Harbor, Nov. 1814, I.R. & M.R. Dec. 31st 1814, D.R. Feby 16, I.R. & M.R. Feby 28, & May 15th 1815. Joined Oct. 26th 1814, by consolidation & absent in Hosp’l at Williamsville or Greenbush – I.R. Lt. H. DeWitt’s Co. 6th U.S. Infy, Sackett’s Harbor, June – 1815. Dropped May 11th 1815 – Book 518 – Discharged at Greenbush, March 30th 1815, of wounds – wounded in right knee, at Bridgewater, July 25th 1814 – 11th U.S. Infy was made 6th after May 17th 1815.

54/2:  Adams, Alexander, Private

Organization:  24th US Infy

Enlistment Date:  July 28/12

Enlistment Period:  5 years

Remarks:  M.R. Dec. 31/13, Left sick at Buffalo, since Nov. 30/13 – Died sometime in Dec. 1813 – See Pension Case.

55:  Adams, Alex’r, Private

Organization:  26th US Infy; Capt. Swearingen

Enlistment Date:  July 13 1813

Enlistment Period:  1 year

Remarks:  S.A.M.R. Sackett’s Harbor, Dec. 31st 1813, Present – sick – S.A.M.R. Capt. Kinney’s Co. 25th Infy June 30/14, J’d Feby 28/14, Remarks:  from Capt. Swearingen’s Co. 26th Infy. Discharged June 20/14. Co. Book 1812 to 1814, Died Dec. [5]th 1812.

56:  Adams, Amajiah, Private

Organization: 9th US Infy; Capt. Chester Lyman

57:  Adams, Amos, Private

Organization:  [8th] US Infy; Col. P. Jack

Description:  5’11 ½”; black eyes; black hair; dark complexion

Age:  20

Occupation:  Farmer

Birth Place:  Briar Creek, S.C.

Enlistment Date:  Nov. 22 or 26 1813

Enlistment Place:  Georgia

Enlisted By:  Lt. Gresham

Enlistment Period:  Nov 2[0] 1818

Remarks:  M.R. Jany 31st 1814 Present – I.R. Capt. F.B. Warlay’s Co. Camp Huger, Ga. Nov. 30th 1814, Absent at Savannah sick since Oct. 25th 1814 – I.R. Camp Flournoy, Ga. Jany 10, D.R. Feby 16 & I.R. Camp Flournoy, Ga. Feby 28th 1815. Present – D.R. Lt. J.H. Mallory’s Co. 7th US. Infy Nov. 30th 1815, Present – I.R. & S.A.M.R. Capt. R.H. Bell’s Co., Ft. Hawkins, Ga. Dec. 31st 1815, I.R. Feby 29 & I.R. & S.A.M.R. June 30th 1816. Present – I.R. Capt. J.F. Corbaley’s Co. Ft. Crawford, Aug. 31. Oct. 31, I.R. & S.A.M.R. Dec. 31st 1816, I.R. Feby 28, April 30, I.R. & S.A.M.R. June 30, & I.R. Sept. 1st 1817. Present – I.R. Ft. Scott, Ga. Feby 28th 1818. On command – Orders dated Fort Gadsden, July 3rd 1818. Transferred from 5th to 3rd Co. – I.R. Capt. J. S. Allison’s Co. Ft St Marks, Aug. 31st 1818. Joined by transfer from 5th Co. & on command at Fort Gadsden – I.R. Ft Hawkins, [???] Oct. 31st 1818, Rect’g – I.R., S.A.M.R. & Mo. Ret. Ft St Marks, E. Fla. Dec. 31st 1818. Discharged, Nov. 21st 1818, term expired – 5th US Infy was made 4th after May 17th 1815. – Discharged from Capt Jno. R. Corbaley’s Co. at Fort Hawkins, Nov. 22nd 1818, term expired – See Pension Case.

58:  Addison, Allen B. or Alex B., Ensign

Organization:  [15th] US Infy; Col. Richard Dennis

Remarks:  Mo. Rets. Ft Johnson, SC, April 8, May & June 1814, at Fort Johnson, S.C. on duty, not properly attached to any company – I.R. Capt. Wm A. Remarks:  Blount’s Co. Ft Johnson, SC., Aug. 31, R.R. Sept, Oct 23, I.R. Oct. 31, R.R. & I.R. Dec. 31st 1814 & Roll Jany 22nd 1815. Joined from late Capt. Robeson’s Co. at Ft Johnson – Recruiting in S.C. since Aug. 21st 1814 – I.R. Ft Johnson, S.C. March 28th, & I.R. Capt. Wm Tisdale’s Co. May 1st 1815. Present – I.R. Capt. Wm O. Taylor’s Co. June 30th 1815, Discharged, June 30th 1815 – Borne as 3-Lieut. Aug. 31st 1814 & 2nd Lieut. from Sept. 1814.

59:  Aggus, Abner (Argus, Aggust), Private

Organization:  2nd US Infy; Capt. Robert Purdy

Enlistment Date:  Apl 22 1805

Enlisted By:  Capt. Hooks

Remarks:  Co. Book 1805 to 1807. Present at Pittsburgh, April, 25th 1805 – Capt. Jno. Campbell’s Co. Book. Joined Co. Sept. 24th Remarks:  1805. – Present at Fort Adams, Nov. 8th 1805 & April 24th 1806 – at Natchitoches, Oct. 16th 1806, at New Orleans, Dec. 2[0]th 1806 & April 2nd 1807 – Drummer – Deserted from Mississippi, June 7th 1807 – Tried by Ct Me at N. O. in Capt. Nicholas’ Co. 7th U.S. Infy May 27th 1813. Selling whiskey…

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

Originally posted 2017-02-14 10:45:05. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Obituary for Lucia Lehouillier (Boily), 1908-2000.

Obituary for Lucia Lehouillier (Boily).

 

LEHOUILLIER

Lucia (Boily)

Au CHSLD de Ste-Hénédine, le 8 septembre 2000, à l’âge de 92 ans, est décécée dame Lucia Boily, epouse de feu Donat Lehouillier. Autrefois de Ste-Marguerite, elle demeurait à Ste-Hénédine. Les funérailles auront leu lundi le 11 septembre à 11 heures. Départ du funérarium de la salle municipale à 10 heures 45 pour l`église de Ste-Marguerite, et de la, au cimetière paroissial. La direction des funérailles a été confiée à la

Maison Funéraire

Nouvelle Vie Inc.

Obituary for Lucia Lehouillier (Boily) (1908-2000)
Obituary for Lucia Boily (1908-2000).

 

261, rue St-Thomas

Ste-Marie-de-Beauce

La famille recevre les condoléances au funérarium de la salle municipale, 235, rue St-Jacques, Ste-Marguerite: Dimanche le 10 septembre de 19 heures à 22 heures, lundi, jour des funérailles, à compter de 9 heures. Elle laisse dans le seuil ses enfants : feu Lucien (Jeannine Bois), Armand (Yolande Trachy), Maurice (Margot Rhéaume), ses petits-enfants; elle était la soeur de feu Émile (feu Blanche Maheu), feu Léo (feu Yvonne Bisson), feu Régina (feu Honorius Lagrange), feu Marie-Anna (feu Camil Vachon), feu Alida (feu Antonio Turmel), feu Émilien (Gisèle Arsenault), feu Aurèle (feu Annette Fontaine), Carmelle (feu Émile Ferland), feu Clermont (Thérèse Breton), Angeline (feu Aurèle Turmel), feu Paul (Claire Girard); elle laisse également dans le deuil plusieurs beaux-frères, belles-soeurs, neveux, nièces, cousins, cousines et de nombreux amis. Pour renseignements : téléphone : (418) 387-4400  Fax : (418) 387-3511.

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

Originally posted 2015-08-25 13:56:38. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Transcription: Crandall Family burial site memorial marker.

 

The following is my transcription of the Crandall Family burial site memorial marker of Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts. The graveyard is located at Pound Road, Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island.

 

Reverend John Crandall was the 8th great grandfather to my children through his first wife.

 

Featured image: Crandall Family Burial Ground, Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island.

CRANDALL FAMILY

Ancestral Burial Site

 

Crandall Burial Site
Crandall Burial Site memorial marker.

Elder John Crandall 1st Wife Died 1669
1647 Hannah Gaylord 2nd Wife 1678

1753 John Crandall after 1819
Rev. War Veteran
1755 Anna Gradner Wife

Tombstone of Reverend John Crandall
Tombstone of Reverend John Crandall.

Esther Lewis Crandall Lydia Saunders Crandall

1738 Lewis Crandall 1830 John G. Crandall
1790 Hannah Crandall Lizzie Primus
1793 Joshua Crandall

FROM “WESTERLY AND ITS WITNESSES”
erected by the
CRANDALL FAMILY ASSOCIATION
30 May 1994

___

Tombstone:

ELDER JOHN CRANDALL

c.1609 – 1676

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

Originally posted 2016-12-09 13:35:18. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Transcription: Draft Board Delinquents, Arlington Heights Herald, January 29, 1943

Following is the transcription of a newspaper article listing draft board delinquents printed in the Arlington Heights Herald on January 29, 1943.

 

Blythe, Clayton William - 1943 Newspaper
Blythe, Clayton William – 1943 Newspaper

Arlington Heights Herald

Volume 16, Number 23

Friday, January 29, 1943

 

List more delinquents of draft board

The following men, registered with Selective Service Local Board No. 1, are classified as suspected delinquents. Any person whose name appears upon the list should report immediately to this board, for correction of records. Failure to do so will cause the board to turn the name over to the United States Attorney for investigation.

John Paul Gasior, 255 N. Brockway, Palatine, Ill.

Walter Wilbert Simila, 634 Brainard st., Detroie, Mich.

John Jack Greschner, 33 N. W. 9th st., Miami, Florida.

Fred Edward Weaver, R. 1, Elgin, Ill.

Robert Loyd Wilt, Wheeling, Ill.

Peter Bose, Bartlett, Ill.

Walter Ladislaw Simo, Box 31, Clearfield, Utah.

Richard Eugene Mosher, General Delivery, Milton Jct., Wisc.

Herman Henry Kleeberg, R. 1, Box 2707, Des Plaines, Ill.

Clayton William Blythe, Palatine rd., Box 471, Arlington Heights, Ill.

Stephan Fritz, R. 1, Roselle, Ill.

Paul August Peske, R. 1, c/o Magnus, Arlington Heights, Ill.

George F. H. Rieckenberg, 3960 Elston ave., Chicago, Ill.

Roy E. Wilson, 502 S. Wapella ave., Mt. Prospect, Ill.

Martin Edward Nelson, R. 4, Elgin, Ill.

Thomas Parker, R. 1, Box 153, Dundee, Ill.

Herbert David James, R. 2, Otis rd., Barrington, Ill.

Ed. W. Hayes, R. 2, Palatine, Ill.

Carl Mendelsky, Karsten Farm, Arlington Heights, Ill.

Henry Mores Johnson, 15 N. State st., Elgin, Ill.

Joseph J. Hajny, R. 4, Box 4298, Elgin, Ill.

Joe Lapsansky, R. 1, Bartlett, Ill.

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


Originally posted 2016-08-09 07:28:55. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

5 ways to find out more about your ancestors.

 

You would think, since we live in a digital age, we would be more in touch with exactly who we are and where our families came from. There was a time when most UK and western families were comprised of Britons who could trace their lineage back countless generations. Such is the case with our family.

 

Those days are quickly fading into obscurity as more and more people travel the globe and emigrate to new countries, perhaps many times in their lifespan.

 

Are you looking to trace your family tree? You can find out more about your ancestors using these 5 handy tips.

(Featured image above: Lincolnshire Regiment, WWI.)

 

1.   Start with your own immediate family.

 

Family portrait from the mid to late 60's with us girls in coordinating outfits hand made by Mom.
My immediate family portrait from the mid to late 60’s with us girls in coordinating outfits hand made by Mom, c. 1967. (That’s me third from the left, just behind my Mom.)

Sometimes Mom and Dad know more than they’ve shared with you.

Perhaps you were too young and they didn’t think you’d be interested, or they were just too busy with the everyday affairs of raising a family.

Start with your parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles. They might have clues you could easily follow up on!

 

2.   Search photo albums and scrap books.

 

Search photo albums and scrapbooks.

This is another tip you could use right in your own home. Start checking out the family photo albums and scrap books. These might hold clues to ‘unknown’ ancestors you never knew existed.

Sometimes families keep mementos through countless generations and these might hold the real key to your ancestry!

 

3.   Research driving records.

 

Traffic Violator

Whoever would have thought that learning to drive a car would be a way in which some long-lost relative could find you in their family tree?

As you are preparing to take your driving theory test and are making use of online practice tests, just think about how important this might be one day. Not only will passing your driving theory enable you to go on to the practical exam, but some day, that driving licence just might put you in touch with a distant cousin you might never have met otherwise.

They may have more information on ancestors you want to record in your genealogy.

 

4.   Online resources and genealogy chat rooms.

 

Genealogy chat rooms.

One really useful site that many searching their ancestry use is an online chat room at Genes United. Here you can chat with others, post messages that you are looking for a specific branch of the family, or simply talk to others about how they are proceeding in their search.

Other important genealogy research sites are the GenUKI group of sites and the UK GenWeb, Canada GenWeb and the US GenWeb sites, which provide valuable information, tips and hints, and also a ton of links to other valuable resources and sites.

 

5.   Join a family history society.

 

Federation of Family History SocietiesThere are a number of family history societies that you might like to join. Some are small local sites while others have a huge online presence.

Certain church affiliations put a great deal of emphasis on ancestry, so you might find a family history society in your local church as well.

Whether you find information from driving records or from relatives you find online in chat rooms, there are so many ways in which to conduct a search that were never available in previous generations. In fact, there are even DNA testing sites that can tell you if you are a ‘blue blood’ or of mixed ancestry.

The key is to be persistent and record, chart and document everything you learn. There are numerous free or inexpensive software programs that make this easy, leading you through step by step.

Before long, you may even be able to trace your lineage back to the Middle Ages.

Wouldn’t that be fun?

Originally posted 2016-05-18 11:43:07. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Transcription: Obituary for Leonard Scott Keefer of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin

Obituary for Leonard Scott Keefer

___________________

obituary for Leonard Scott Keefer.
Obituary for Leonard Scott Keefer.

SCOTT KEEFER PASSES AWAY.

Scott Keefer died at his home in this city last Saturday morning about nine o’clock, aged 73 years, 3 months and 12 days.

While his health had been failing gradually for the last two or three years, it was not until about New Year, when he had a severe attack of la grippe, that it was felt there was any cause for worry. He did not seem to recover from the effects of this attack, and about ten days prior to his death he took a serious turn for the worse, and continued in a critical condition until death occurred Saturday morning from heart failure.

Mr. Keefer had been a resident of Dell Rapids for nearly thirty years, having been a grain buyer until he retired a few years ago. He was born in Paynesville, Ohio, December 6th, 1812. When he was eight years old he moved with his parents to Wisconsin, where he resided until about 33 years ago, when he came to Egan, Dakota, to take charge of a grain elevator. While a resident of Egan he was a member of the Masonic fraternity and also an active member of the Methodist church, of which he was treasurer and a leader.

After leaving Egan he was located at Flandreau for a time and then came to Dell Rapids, where he has since resided.

He was a veteran of the civil war, having enlisted as a member of Co. H. First Minnesota Heavy Artillery, at St. Paul, February 8th, 1865, and served in Tennessee until the close of the war, being discharged Sept. 27, 1865. He was an active member of the G.A.R.

He had been married twice, the last time to Miss Anna Qualseth, in 1892, who with four sons and one daughter survive him. There are also a son and a daughter of his first marriage, W. S. Keefer, of Rozellville, Wis., and Mrs. Cora Gaske, of Beaver Dam, Wis., both of whom, and the latter accompanied by her husband, are here to attend the funeral.

The children here are Leonard, Harry, Dewey, Annie May and Geddy.

Mr. Keefer was widely known and was universally esteemed for his kindly ways and disposition, his public spirit and good citizenship.

The funeral was held Wednesday, at the home at 1:30, and at the M. E. church at 2 o’clock, Rev Black conducting the service, which was largely attended.

___________________

We wish to express our heartfelt thanks to all those who so kindly assisted us in the sickness and death of our dear husband and father; for the beautiful floral offerings and to the old soldiers and choir and to Rb. Black, of the Methodist church, for his words of cheer and comfort.

Mrs. L. F. Keefer and Children.

___________________

You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

Originally posted 2016-08-19 20:44:09. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Transcription: 1564 will of Thomas Blyth of Louth, Lincolnshire.

The following is  my transcription of the 1564 will of Thomas Blyth of Louth, Lincolnshire, England.

In the name of God Amen.

The xxvijth Daye of ffebruary in the year of our Lord God a thousand five hundreth sixtie and four I Thomas Blyth of Louth ??????? draper ???? in boddie and parfecte in remembrance doth ordaine and maketh my laste will and testamente in manner and form following. First I bequeath my soule to God almightie my only creator and ?????? and my boddie to be buried in the Church or Churchyarde ?????? ?? shall please God to call me to I give and bequeath to the pore people of sssssss sssss shilings and ?????? pence. ???? give to ye poore people of Thorneton three shillinge and ?????? pence.

Item I give to the poore people of O??ersby five shillinge. Then I give to the reper????? of the Cathedrill Churche in Lincolne si? pence.

Item I give and bequeath to Elizabeth my wife fortie pounds with than half parte of my household and my new cupboard in the ????? parlor only ??????.

Item I give and bequeath to Edward John William and Jonathan, my sonnes to ???? out of them twentie pounts. And if it please God that any of my sonnes decease before they be of the age of xxj yeres, than my will is that the parte or parts of them for deceased shalbe evenly divided amongest the bretheren that livest.

Item my will and my ??? is that Edward Blyte my sone shalbe kept three yeres at Lo?oth or some other good scoole of my ????, and if his ?????? think it be apte to take l???ing, than my will is that he shall goe to Cambridge for ??? yeres his twentie poundes will disthan?e ??ym.

Item I give and bequeath to Elizabeth and Grace my daughters either of them twentie poundes, and if either of them dye before they be married, then my will is that her parte that is dis????ed be equally divided betwixt Edward Blyth and John my sonnes, and the daughter that lyveth. And if they both dye, than my will is that my foure sonnes aforesaide shall have it ????? ??????? them.

Item I bequeath to Catheren my daughter fortie pounds and my will is that George South shall have the order of her, to before as he shall ??????? mete for her proffitt.

Item I doe require my brothers George South, Patrick Blyte and Will Blyth to be helpers and aff??????? to myne Executor in all his needes and ?????? and for these payments I doe give ????? ????? of them one olde ??yere.

Item I doe require and ????????? ? ????? ??????? to be the supervisor of this my last will and for yis payment I doe give hym fortie shillings.

Item I give and bequeath to my younge master William after fortie shillings and I ???? ?????? requiring hym to be good in???? my ?????????? children the residue of all my goodes my debts payed and funerall expense deducted I give and bequeath to Thomas Blyth my oldest sonne, ??????? ?????? the sole Executor of this my last will and testament provided alwayes that if uppon the ???? of my goods my debts beinge payede and my funerall expense deducted, that it shall appe?? that myne Executors ?????? shall not amounte to the ??ere valu of fortie poundes then my will is ???? ??????? my daughter shall abate of her legacie before written to the valu of f????? poundes and every childe to abbate for morhe of theire portons at the saide ?????ing ? ????? my ???? ?????? ?onth shall declare equally by theire dis????ons. ?oe that my full meaning is that my Executors parte shalbe fortie poundes. And my will and mynde further is that my saide Executor shall not declare noe will uppon my goods that were myne during three yeres ???? ????ing this present daye except he be married.

And then if it shall soe come to passe that myne E????? shall disease within the saide three yeres, then my will is that ??????? my saide wife, yf the ?? ???ing shalbe the sole Eecutrix sholde have had ??? ?? ha?? lyved, the saide three yeres ???? whereas I am indebted ?oute the children of my late brother Thomas ??????? in certaine somes of monney my mynde and will is that forte poundes thereof shalbe payed on to the handes of the saide George South ymmediatly after my disease, uppon ? dis??????? and the rest to be payed within three yeres, if they per????? any ?????????? in my saide Executor and yf my saide Supervisor and my brother So??the think my saide Executor to ?????? in  his fulfillment, then they be theire dis??????? to ta?? ????? as my saide brother ?????????? children maye be affirmed uppon theire ???? ymmediatly. In Witnes hereof onto this, my last will and testamente I have subscribed my name with my ????? hande in the presense of Thomas Otleye, Davide Johnson, Lawrence Troydall, and Willm Baylye, and Christofer Willinson ????? George So??the provided always, that yf it shall fort??? either that my wife shall marry, or my sonne Thomas to marrie, or that they cannot ????? that then and ymmediatly after ????? marriage or disagreemente that my wife shall have my lease of my farme in ???saye for the terme of ten yeres that ?? ???????? ????????? hath promised me in the same.

Probatum (continues in Latin… unable to read or translate)

Transcription of the 1564 will of Thomas Blyth of Louth, Lincolnshire, England.
Transcription of the 1564 will of Thomas Blyth of Louth, Lincolnshire.

____________________

 

As you can see by the strings of question marks above, I had trouble transcribing several words. If you know any of the missing words or phrase, please do comment with them and I’ll update the transcription.

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

Irish Genetic Homeland Finder: Ancestry by DNA, place names, surnames.

The Irish Genetic Homeland Finder website is taking advantage of Ireland being the one country that preceded all others in using paternal surnames, by using the surnames as well as DNA and geographical place names in pinpointing direct male ancestry for approximately 1,000 years.
Irish Genetic Homeland Finder: Ancestry by DNA
Irish Genetic Homeland Finder traces Irish Ancestry using DNA, place names, and surnames.

This is an interactive site available to anyone who may be curious about their Irish surname, or those interested in more detailed research into Irish surnames that appear in their family tree.

Registration for this site is free and the first six queries are free, although there are fees applied on a pay as you go basis for additional queries.

All that is necessary is to input your surname(s) of interest to find locations where farmers with that surname cluster, in addition to place names and castles associated with the surname(s). Once the search button is pressed, it is possible to zoom within the interactive map to find known areas of concentrations of the names.

This works particularly well in Ireland because original farming families of a particular surname can still be found farming the lands of their ancestors. Those farmers also used their name in naming places they lived and castles they built, owned and passed on through their families.

If there is more than one Irish surname in one’s ancestry, it is possible to input all surnames and find locations where the highest concentration of each surname can be compared and finding likely places where both surnames coexisted.

Searches can be saved to avoid ever having to pay for the same search twice.

When examined in conjunction with an ancestral DNA test, it is possible to achieve a much more detailed and precise result. The DNA test can help to reveal surnames of ancestors and neighbors up to about 1,000 years ago.

I don’t have much Irish ancestry, but I’m sure this site could be hugely valuable to those whose Irish ancestry is more significant.

photo credit: George L Smyth via photopin cc

Transcription – Civil War letters of Pte. David Coon now completed.

I’m very happy to say I have finally completed the transcription of the 100+ pages of letters from Pte. David Coon to his family during his time of service and his capture and imprisonment by Confederate forces in Libby Prison and then Salsbury Prison, where he died late in 1864.

I do apologize for taking so long, but it was a great deal of work and had to be done when I could find time amid my responsibilities updating and maintaining my four blogs and my daily responsibilities as a wife and mother of two young adults.

I have divided the transcription into individual website pages containing 10 pages of letters each. The pages can be easily scrolled through using the page navigation links at the bottom of each web page.

This is a treasured artifact of our family. We do not hold the original letters, but we do have an original typed transcription of the letters completed in 1913 (interestingly enough, 100 years old as of this year) by David’s son Dr. John W. Coon.

My Signature

Transcription: In Memoriam for Jean X. Roy.

The following is my transcription of the In Memoriam for Jean X. Roy upon his death.

Jean-Xavier Roy Memorial
‘In Memoriam’ for Jean-Xavier Roy.

In loving Memory of

Jean X. Roy

Died December 21, 1979

PRAYER

O GENTLEST Heart of Jesus ever present in the Blessed Sacrament, ever consumed with burning love for the poor captive souls in Purgatory have mercy on the soul of Thy departed servant. Be not severe in Thy judgment but let some drops of Thy Precious Blood fall upon the devouring flames and do Thou O Merciful Savior send Thy angels to conduct Thy departed servant to a place of refreshment, light and peace.

J. N. Boufford and Sons Inc.

_____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

The benefits of storing your DNA for future use.

Assisting with legal issues, future comparison for accuracy, investigation of family histories, and verification of paternity and maternity are only a few of the benefits of storing your DNA for future use.
storing your DNA for future use.
The benefits of storing your DNA for future use.

As of June 2013, it has been legal for law enforcement officers to obtain DNA samples from people who have been arrested but not convicted of a serious crime. The purpose of this collection process is to enable the police to easily scan DNA evidence that has been collected from other crime scenes with the intention of helping them solve more cases. Although this was a controversial Supreme Court decision, it has also opened the door for individuals to consider protecting their rights by storing their own DNA samples. After all, evidence is not always as tamper-proof as it should be, and it could be extremely beneficial to have a professionally collected and stored sample for comparison’s sake.

What are the perks of storing DNA samples?

There are many reasons that an individual could decide to store their DNA. For example, it can provide an easily testable record of their family line for future genealogy enthusiasts, and it can also speed up the process of determining paternity. From a legal standpoint, being able to conclusively verify whether or not someone is the parent of a child can be imperative in certain cases. It is also important to consider the implications of DNA on criminal cases. The Justice Project has helped people become exonerated years after a conviction by comparing DNA samples, and now everyone has the opportunity to make sure that a reliable sample of their DNA will be available if they find themselves accused of a crime they did not commit.

How will stored DNA impact a legal case?

It is necessary for a DNA sample to be properly processed and stored in order for it to provide reliable results during a legal case. Any tampering or improper storage of DNA could cause the results to be skewed. Additionally, it is important to note that prosecutors do not always use DNA as evidence. In these cases, having properly stored DNA could very easily help lead to an acquittal, especially if any DNA that was found on the scene does not match the samples that are provided by the accused. Even if someone does get convicted, their stored sample could end up getting them exonerated in the future if new DNA evidence is found.

What happens if the DNA samples do not match?

If a prosecutor claims that an individual’s DNA links them to a crime but their sample does not match the one that the accused has in storage, it will typically become necessary for law enforcement officers to obtain a second sample. Going through this process can help erase any doubts about improper storage and processing, and it can make the difference between an acquittal and a conviction. With this in mind, it makes perfect sense for everyone to protect themselves by storing a sample of their DNA with a professional collection company.

Article Source

photo credit: Spanish Flea via photopin cc

Who’ulda Thought Headstone Hunting Could Be Such Fun?

Although my husband and children all enjoy hunting moose, headstone hunting is about as far as I’ll go.
headstone hunting at Melanson Community Hall
Melanson Community Hall in the town of Melanson. My mother’s maiden name is Melanson.

About six years ago, we decided to take our one and only big family vacation – a three week driving trip from central Ontario to Acadian territories in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

Although this was a planned vacation, it was an opportunity as well to teach the kids something of their Acadian heritage and see the area in which my mother, her family and ancestors lived for generations.

Melanson Mountain Sign, across from the Melanson Community Hall while headstone hunting.
Melanson Mountain Sign, across from the Melanson Community Hall.

We did a lot of sightseeing in places like Moncton to see the tidal bore of the Bay of Fundy, and the Hopewell Rocks where I got a wonderful picture of Erin and Stuart against the rocks at high tide. I’ve since had several people accuse me of having ‘photoshopped’ the photo, but that’s not the case at all.

Other sites along our journey were:

  • Fort Edward and Fort Beausejour, where several of our ancestors were imprisoned during the Acadian Expulsion;
Grand Pré Chapel while headstone hunting.
Grand Pré Chapel.
  • Grand Pré, the site of the meeting in which Acadian men were informed of their imminent expulsion;
  • Melanson village and mountain, the site of the settlement of one original Melanson brother and pioneer, Pierre Melanson and his descendants;
  • Melanson Settlement, the historic site where our ancestor Charles, the other pioneer brother, settled;
  • Fort Anne, where we had the experience of a lifetime, experiencing the highly entertaining ‘Graveyard Tour‘ hosted by Alan Melanson, a distant cousin; our unexpected discovery of an original ‘aboiteau’ from the Melanson Settlement site, a hollowed wooden log with a hinged valve at one end which was used to drain the water from the fields (it had been in storage at North Hills Museum and she took us to see it when she heard me talking about it); and a visit to Ste. Anne University, where the students and staff were very knowledgeable and amazingly helpful, finding a great deal of documentation for my research.
The mysterious aboiteau used by the Acadians found on our headstone hunting trip.
The mysterious aboiteau used by the Acadians to control the water on the marshes where they homesteaded and farmed.

Our most unexpected discovery was at a tiny, charming Catholic church in Argyle, near Yarmouth, Nova Scotia.

When driving through we spotted a graveyard with hundreds of headstones right along side the road, noticing right away that there were some very old headstones in the mix. At my request, Mark stopped the car and we got out to have a look.

Ste. Anne Catholic Church in Argyle, Nova Scotia - headstone hunting trip.
Ste. Anne Catholic Church and graveyard in Argyle, Nova Scotia – where we spent one Sunday morning headstone hunting.

Our plan was that Mark would have the camera, I would have my notebook to write hard-to-read transcriptions, and Erin and Stuart would be the scouts, running ahead, raising their hands and shouting to let us know they’d found a ‘Melanson’ or ‘Fougere’ headstone.

Now this was a really quiet, cool, damp day and we were just waiting for the rain that appeared to be imminent, but that didn’t deter us. We made short work of the task, and went through the vast graveyard in great speed.

It wasn’t long after starting though, that I noticed the cars driving by slowing right down to check us out and see what we were doing. Some actually came to a dead stop in the middle of the road. Upon reflection, I realized how odd we all must have looked – especially the kids, running from headstone to headstone, raising their hands and shouting. Did they think we were playing some kind of game?

As silly as we must have looked, it was a great deal of fun and it’s a trip we all talk of to this day. We’d all love to do it again.

King Richard III’s genome to be sequenced by scientists.

Previous posts I’ve written described our fascination with King Richard III and the search for his grave, which ended successfully when his skeleton was unearthed in a Leicester parking lot in England.

Richard III, King of England

Now scientists have announced they will be sequencing Richard III’s DNA, which is of great interest to us and numerous other descendants of Richard III and his family.

He is an ancestor of Mark’s family and has been the subject of some research on my part. The resulting posts were:

Richard III's grave in Leicester parking lot.I’ve been toying with the idea of getting Mark’s and my DNA, and now that DNA profiles are more prevalent, it’s looking more and more like it would be a worthwhile endeavor.

Tombstone plaque for Richard III.Research can only be so accurate. Every family and generation has experienced their scandals and secrets that were never documented, and which may have affected the recorded ancestries, such as a child born from an illicit affair that was never disclosed. Even more questionable are the undocumented connections.

DNA might be helpful in solving some mysteries in more recent generations of branches of my family, as it is the one and only way we might have to prove blood connections to family and ancestors, either confirming or refuting the documentary evidence. It would be wonderful to have some of my questions answered and suspicions and theories confirmed.

photo credit: University of Leicester via photopin cc

photo credit: OZinOH via photopin cc

photo credit: lisby1 via photopin cc

Quidi Vidi Village: A Part of St. John’s, Apart From St. John’s | Academia.edu

Edited by Gerald L. Pocius and Lisa Wilson

Quidi Vidi Village
Quidi Vidi Village Fishing Stages

Fishing outports (like Quidi Vidi) typify the Newfoundland rural landscape, but fishing went on for generations within the confines of the city of St. John’s.

Seven years ago, public sector folklore graduate students documented the spaces of another St. John’s fishing community—the Battery—perched on the cliffs of St. John’s Harbour. The 2013 field school focused on the well-known fishing settlement within city boundaries—Quidi Vidi.

Quidi Vidi is the only community in the province that is actually referred to as a village— perhaps attesting to it being a place within a place. For generations, local residents have often referred to their living in Quidi Vidi Village, or simply—the Village. The community, therefore, has exhibited this dualidentity of being part of a city and being unique in its identity.

So to this unique place the participants of the 2013 field school turned their attention. Seven students spent three weeks in September, documenting a series of houses and outbuildings throughout the community.

These seven were: Christine Blythe (Florida), Kayla Carroll(Newfoundland), John Laduke (New York), Adrian Morrison (NovaScotia), Klara Nichter (Kentucky), Kari Sawden (Alberta), and XuanWang (China). Cyndi Egan (Florida) acted as the field school assistant.

Students were divided into three teams, and each group then documented one house. After this work, each student was responsible for the measuring of one outbuilding, and preparing the text for that plan, gathering information from interviews with the owners as well as describing the structure itself.

Besides the architectural research, each student wrote a brief essay on particular traditions found in the village, interviewing long-time residents about local knowledge and practices. 

Read on …

Source: Quidi Vidi Village: A Part of St. John’s, Apart From St. John’s | Academia.edu

Transcription: US, WWI Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 – John Croll Macpherson for John Croll MacPherson

This is my transcription of the US, WWI Draft Registration Card for John Croll Macpherson.

REGISTRATION CARD

US WWI Draft Registration Card for John MacPherson
US WWI Draft Registration Card for John MacPherson

SERIAL NUMBER: 1658

ORDER NUMBER: A782

CELL 1

John Crowl Macpherson     (First Name, Middle Name, Last Name)

CELL 2

PERMANENT HOME ADDRESS

1230 E. Flanders, Portland, Multnomah, Oregon     (No., Street or R.F.D. No., City or town, County, State)

CELL 3

Age in Years     32

CELL 4

Date of Birth     April 7, 1886     (Month, Day, Year)

_______________________________

RACE

CELL 5        White     X

CELL 6        Negro

CELL 7       Oriental

                    Indian

CELL 8       Citizen

CELL 9       Noncitizen

U.S. CITIZEN

CELL 10     Native Born

CELL 11     Naturalized

CELL 12     Citizen by Father’s Naturalization Before Registrant’s Majority

ALIEN    

CELL 13      Declarant     X

CELL 14      Non-declarant

CELL 15      If not a citizen of the U.S. of what nation are you a citizen or subject?     Scotland

PRESENT OCCUPATION

CELL 16      Mgr. Bakery

EMPLOYER’S NAME

CELL 17      Meier & Frank Co.

PLACE OF EMPLOYMENT OR BUSINESS

CELL 18      Sth (?) Morrison Portland Multnomah Or.     (No., Street or R.F.D. No., City or town, County, State)

NEAREST RELATIVE

NAME

CELL 19      Hilda Macpherson

ADDRESS

CELL 20      1230 E. Flanders Multnomah Or.     (No., Street or R.F.D. No., City or town, County, State)

I AFFIRM THAT I HAVE VERIFIED ABOVE ANSWERS AND THAT THEY ARE TRUE.

P.M.G.O.

Form No. 1 (Red)

John Croll MacPherson

(Registrant ?????????????????????)         (OVER)

REGISTRAR’S REPORT

36-1-16 “C”

DESCRIPTION OF REGISTRANT

HEIGHT

CELL 21      Tall

CELL 22      Medium     X

CELL 23      Short

BUILD

CELL 24      Slender

CELL 25      Medium

CELL 26      Stout

COLOR OF EYES

CELL 27      Brown

COLOR OF HAIR

CELL 28      Brown

CELL 29      Has person lost arm, leg, hand, eye, or is he obviously physically disqualified? (Specify.)     No.

CELL 30     

I certify that my answers are true; that the person registered has read or has had read to him his own answers; that I have witnessed his signature or mark, and that all of his answers of which I have knowledge are true, except as follows:

_____________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________

Mrs. William W. Porter

(Signature of Registrar)

Date of Registration     Sept. 12, 1918.

STAMP:

      |      LOCAL BOARD

      |     DIV. NO. 7

      |     COURT HOUSE

      |     PORTLAND, OREG.

(The stamp of the Local Board having jurisdiction of the area in which the registrant has his permanent home shall be placed in this box.)

??-????     (OVER)

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

Transcription: Whitcomb burials of Lancaster, Massachusetts, prior to 1850.

Whitcomb Burials
Whitcomb Burials

Transcription of the Whitcomb burials of Lancaster, Massachusetts, prior to  1850.

THE

BIRTH, MARRIAGE AND DEATH

REGISTER,

CHURCH RECORDS AND EPITAPHS

OF

LANCASTER, MASSACHUSETTS

1643-1850

EDITED BY
HENRY S. NOURSE, A. M.
______

LANCASTER:
1890

EPITAPHS IN LANCASTER BURIAL GROUNDS OF
DATE PRIOR TO 1850.
____________

Whitcomb BurialsTHE OLD BURIAL FIELD.

The founders of the town, and their descendants during the 17th century at least, buried their dead without formal services—foll0wing the custom of the Puritans in England-—and perhaps a plot of ground for the family graves was sometimes selected within the home lot or orchard. Early in the present century ancient graves were visible near the sites of both the Roper and the Prescott garrisons. But in the infancy of the Nashaway Plantation, land adjoining the meeting-house site was set apart for common use as a “burying place.” The practice of marking graves by incribed headstones probably did not begin until after the resettlement, one apparent exception being that of Mrs. Dorothy Prescott, who died in I674. The oldest date now to be found is that over the grave of the first ]ohn Houghton—I684. For half a century all memorial stones were but fragments of slate riven from some ledge, or rough granite slabs, upon which unskilled hands rudely incised name and date,—the latter being often upon a foot-stone or on the back of the head-stone. Many of the older inscriptions are illegible to most eyes. In his History of Lancaster, Reverend A. P. Marvin has given a plan of this ancient burial place, upon which the marked graves are located and numbered, and has added literal copies of the epitaphs. In the following carefully revised list of inscriptions the same numbering is adopted. Their arrangement is indicated by division lines. Numbers omitted are of stones not lettered, or of misplaced foot-stones found to belong with other numbers.

Whitcomb Burials of Lancaster, Massachusettts
Whitcomb Burials of Lancaster, Massachusettts

410

LANCASTER RECORDS.

HERE LIES BURIED I Ye BODY OF MR | JEREMIAH WILSON| WHO DEPARTED | THIS LIFE | MARCH Ye 22d | A D 1743 | IN Ye 77th YEAR | OF HIS AGE
HERE LIES | THE BODY OF | JOSIAH WHE | TCOMB SEN. D | ECEASED IN H | IS 80 YEAR | JW DYED | MARCH THE | 21 1718
Here Lyes Buried | ye Body of Mr | DAVID WHETCOMB \ Who Died April | 11th 1730 in ye 62d | Year of His Age
Here lied Buried | ye Body of Mrs. Mary | Whetcomb Wife to | Mr. David Whetcomb, | Who Died Janury | 5th, 1733-4 in ye 67th | Year of Her Age.
Here Lyes Buried | ye Body of Mr. HEZEKIAH WHETCOMB | Who Died May 6th. | 1732 in ye 31st Year | of His Age

Of the 4 Whetcomb gravestones legible prior to 1850 only the stone of Josiah Whetcomb remains in 2013.

___________________

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Kaziah Hancock: Artist paints portraits in honor of fallen soldiers.

This video is actually quite old, but I find it – and the artist, Kaziah Hancock  – quite amazing!

Kaziah Hancock portrait.
Portrait of Dale Panchot by Kaziah Hancock.

She paints, frames, and ships the portraits of her ‘friends’ and ‘buddies’ to their grieving families, as with this one for Minnesota’s Dale Panchot.

I’m posting this video in honor of the US Memorial Day and the lost souls.

As a military daughter, wife and mother, I truly appreciate the efforts of anyone to honor our military heroes, especially those who gave their lives for their country, whatever country that may be.

photo credit: The U.S. Army via photopin cc

Chris Hadfield and Benedict Cumberbatch are cousins?

To coincide with the return of Commander Chris Hadfield from the international space station, Ancestry.ca has announced that he is 6th cousin to british actor Benedict Cumberbatch who is starring as the villain in Star Trek Into Darkness.

Chris Hadfield’s role being based in reality, Benedict Cumberbatch’s based in fantasy, they both explore the frontier of space.

I loved Benedict Cumberbatch as Sherlock Holmes in the recent series and as much as I’m indifferent to all space epics, I might just watch Star Trek Into Darkness, solely because he’s in it.

It’s a small world, uh-h-h, universe?