All things history and genealogy.

All things history and genealogy.

Category: Religion

A Swedish History: Gummeson and Nelson

My husband and children’s swedish history includes Gummeson and Nelson ancestors for the most part. Our children’s great grandfather through their grandmother (their father’s mother) was August Gummeson.

Born July 30, 1887 in Polk County, Wisconsin, USA, August was one of nine children of David Gummeson from Sandsjo, Socken Kranebergs, Lan Smoland, Sweden and his wife Kristine Christina “Christina” Nelson from Urshult, Socken Kransbergs, Lan Smoland, Sweden.

David GummesonDavid Gummeson, born February 8, 1843, was the son of Gudmund Gumme Svensson of Vackelsang, Sweden and his wife Anna Olafsdotter, of Sodra Sandsjo, Sweden. Gudmund, in turn, was the son of Sven Hankansson and Elin Petersdotter, both from Sweden as far as we can tell.

He married Kristine “Christina” Nelson, born February 17, 1857, who was the daughter and second oldest of eight children of Peter Gustaf Nilsson of Linneryd, Sweden and Johanna “Hanna Johansdotter” of Urshalt, Sweden. Peter Gustaf Nilsson was the son and eldest of the ten children of Soldat Nils Piquet of Linneryd, Sweden and his wife Marta “Martha” Andersdotter of Hevmantorp, Sweden.

Christine Gummeson
Christine Gummeson

Although we have no documentary evidence to support this, we believe Soldat Nils Piquet was the son of Sven Peterson and Christina Nilsdotter, both of Sweden.

Following the centuries old naming convention of Sweden, the sons of the first two generations above took on the first names of their fathers, followed by the suffix ‘son’ added at the end. Gudmund Gumme Svensson (‘Svens’son), was the son of Sven Hankansson, and therefore, it can be assumed that the father of Sven Hankansson’s first name was Hankan, although we have no documentary evidence of such as yet. David Gummeson (‘Gumme’son), likewise took on his father Gumme’s first name with ‘son’ added at the end.

We have no photos or documents regarding Gudmund Gumme Svensson and Anna Olafsdotter. The Gummeson paper trail starts with David Gummeson and Christina Nelson.

CHRISTINA NELSON’S ANCESTRY

Sven Peterson’s birth date is unknown. Christine Nilsdotter was born in 1768 in Rolsme, Linneryd, Sweden and they were married sometime before 1794. Sven and Christine’s son was Soldat Nils Piquet, who was born April 8, 1794 in Linneryd, Sweden and died December 6, 1869, at the age of 75, in Gronadel, Sweden. So far, I have been unable to locate documentation proving he was the son of Sven Peterson and Christine Nilsdotter, or whether Soldat Nils Piquet had any siblings.

Farm House of Nils Svensson Peket (Picquet) in Sweden

Soldat Nils Piquet married Marta “Martha” Andersdotter in 1822. Martha was born on June 9, 1800 in Hevmantorp, Sweden and died June 8, 1889 at the age of 88. Soldat and Martha had ten children, all of whom were born in Sweden, and with whom they immigrated to the USA on October 22, 1870. They were:

  1. Peter Gustaf Nilsson Piquet, born October 30, 1823 in Linneryd, Sweden and died in about 1890 at the age of 67, in Polk County, Wisconsin, USA. He may also have been known as Nels Peter Nelson, who   immigrated to the USA July 2, 1871.
  2. Eva Piquet was born on September 23, 1825.
  3. Johan Nilsson Piquet was born on August 16, 1827 in Linneryd, Sweden.
  4. Johanna Piquet was born on September 3, 1829 in Linneryd, Sweden and she died in 1860 at the age of 31.
  5. Daniel Piquet was born on Octboer 17, 1831 in Linneryd, Sweden.
  6. Anders Piquet Nilsson was born on October 24, 1833 in Linderyd and he died on May 13, 1921 at the age of 87 in Polk County, Wisconsin, USA.
  7. Karl Piquet was born on November 2, 1835.
  8. Samuel Piquet was born on May 24, 1838.
  9. Carolina Piquet was born on December 2, 1840.
  10. Ingrid Kristina Piquet was born on December 25,1842.

Peter Gustaf Nilsson Piquet married Johanna Hanna Johansdotter, who was born on February 10, 1828 in Urshalt, Sweden. She died in Polk County, Wisconsin, USA. Peter and Hanna had eight children:

  1. Caroline Nelson was born on October 7, 1854 in Sweden.
  2. Kristine Christina Nelson (also known as Christina) was born February 17, 1857 in Urshult, Socken Kransbergs, Lan Smoland, Sweden and died June 29, 1931 in Amery, Polk County, Wisconsin, USA.
  3. Eva Catharina Nelson was born on September 29, 1859 in Urshult, Socken Kransbergs, Lan Smoland, Sweden. She was also known as Eva Catharina Petersdotter Nelson and she died in Amery, Polk County, Wisconsin, USA.
  4. Nils Johan Nelson was born on September 29, 1861.
  5. Sven August Nelson was born on October 3, 1863.
  6. Emilie Nelson was born on June 30, 1866.
  7. Gustaf Adolf Nelson was born on February 12, 1871.
  8. Emma Sophia Nelson was born on November 9, 1876 in Polk County, Wisconsin, USA. She died of Typhoid fever on June 6, 1907 at the age of 30 in Amery, Polk County, Wisconsin, USA. Emma had married Peter Lundquist and lived nearby. One of their children was named Pearl. Pearl was the youngest child of four, and when her mother died in 1906, at the age of 31, Peter Lundquist moved with his three oldest children to care for nieces and nephews who had also been orphaned, leaving Pearl (7 months old) in the care of Christina, who soon married her second husband Charles Hasselquist. The following obituary for Pearl was published in the County Ledger Press on January 14, 1999:

Pearl Lundquist, age 92, passed away Jan 2 at the Golden Age Manor in Amery. She was born Nov 2, 1906 in Amery to Peter amd Emma (Nelson) Lundquist. In June 1907, Pearl’s mother Emma passed away from Typhoid Fever. Pearl was only 7 years old. Pearl’s father and three older sisters left for Portland Oregon in August to take care of his neices and nephews who had (also) been orphaned with the oldest child being 12. Pearl was left with her aunt, Mrs. Christina Gummeson, who lived on what is now the Marlin Bottolfson farm. She was a widow with 9 children of her own. She (Pearl) attended the Shilo School for the first grade. When she was 8, she moved to the farm north of Shilo where Christina married Charles Hasselquist. She then attended the Goose Lake School and later attended High School in Amery, where she stayed with another aunt. Rev. Ardren at First Lutheran in Amery, confirmed her in the Swedish language. When she live near Balsam Lutheran as a child, she walked 3 1/2 miles to Sunday School and Luther League. She was active at Balsam Lutheran teaching Sunday School as well as being the substitute organist for services. During WWII, Pearl worked in New Richmond packing K Rations. For 43 years she worked at Paradise Lodge in Balsam Lake. She was preceded in death by three sisters. Interment was in the Balsam Lutheran Cemetery with Williamson funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Her funeral was on Wednesday, Jan 6 at 1 p.m. at Balsam Lutheran Church, rural Amery, with the Rev. Ed Rasmussen officiating.

DAVID GUMMESON’S ANCESTRY

Sven Hankansson was born on April 15, 1767 and he married Elin Petersdotter, who was born September 27, 1778. Sven and Elin had seven children.

  1. Gudmund Gumme Svensson was born July 10, 1796 in Vackelsang, Sweden and died 1861 in Sodra Sandsjo, Veramala Narragard, Sweden.
  2. Catherina Svensdottter was born on November 5, 1793.
  3. Magnus Svensson was born on January 22, 1795. He died just under six months of age on July 2, 1795.
  4. Magnus Svensson was born on February 17, 1798. He died on April 27, 1804 at the age of 6.
  5. Annica Svensson was born on August 11, 1799 and died on August 17, 1903 at the age of 104.
  6. Johannes Svensson was born on September 14, 1801.
  7. Ingrid Svensdotter was born on August 7, 1803. She died at just five days old on August 12, 1803.
Gummeson House in Sweden
Gummeson house in Sweden.

Gudmund Gumme Svensson was born on July 10, 1796 in Vackelsang, Sweden. He died in 1861 at the age of 65 in Sodra Sandsjo, Veramala Narragard, Sweden. Gudmund married Anna Olafsdotter on February 23, 1825 in Sodra Sandsjo, Sweden. Anna was born on December 21, 1801 in Sodra Sandsjo, Sweden and she died November 9, 1845 at 43 years of age in Sodra Sandsjo, Sweden. Gudmund and Anna had six children.

Ingrid Gummesdotter
Ingrid Gummesdotter
  1. Johannes Gummeson was born on April 7, 1826 and died in infancy not too long after in 1826 in Sodra Sandsjo, Sweden.
  2. Elin Kaisa Gummesdoter was born on June 7, 1827 and later died in Sweden.
  3. Ingrid Catharine Gummeson was born on September 16, 1829 in Sondra Sandsja, Sweden. She died in 1907 at the age of 78 in USA. She was also known as “Ingrid and/or Katherina” Gummesdotter.
  4. Marie Gummesdotter was born January 28, 1841 and died soon after in her infancy.
  5. David Gummeson, born February 8,1843 in Sandsjo, Socken Kranebergs, Lan Smoland, Sweden, died September 20, 1899 at the age of 56 in Amery, Polk County, Wisconsin, USA, was buried in Evangelical Lutheran Church Cemetery, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, USA.
  6. Infant Gummeson was born on November 9, 1845 and died at 62 in 1907.

DAVID GUMMESON AND CHRISTINA NELSON

The Gummeson family.
David and Christine Gummeson and Family (c. 1893) – back l-r: Gustav Herman Gummeson, Johanna Matilda (Tillie) Gummeson, Ernest Wilhelm Gummeson – middle l-r: David Gummeson (Axel Frederik Gummeson on David’s lap), Frank Elmer Gummeson, Kristine Christina Gummeson (Esther Christine Gummeson on her lap) – front l-r: August Leonard Gummeson, Hilda Caroline Gummeson.

David Gummeson (also spelled Gummesson) was registered as a farm boy living with his sister Elin Gummesdotter and her husband Hakan Svensson at Kroksjoboda Norrgard in Tingsas, Sweden. David’s sister Ingrid Gummesdotter was married to Charles (Carl) Lindstrom. When David was 2 years old, his mother Anna Olafsdotter died on November 9, 1845. His father Gudmund Gumme Svensson died in 1861. On Sep 20 1899, David Gummeson died in Amery, Polk County, Wisconsin, USA, age 56. He was buried in Evangelical Lutheran Church Cemetery, Balsam lake.

Johanna Matilda Gummeson
Johanna Matilda Gummeson

Christina Nelson lived at Savsjodal near Savsjomala at Hunshult in Urshult. She immigrated to the USA at age 17, subsequently marrying David on December 9, 1876 at age 19, when he was 33. David is shown with his family in the 1880 Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin census as a Farmer. Records show Christina’s postal address of General Delivery, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, USA on December 10, 1917. Christina died June 29, 1931 at 74 on the farm near Amery, Polk County, Wisconsin.  David and Christina had nine children:

  1. Johanna Matilda “Tillie” Gummeson, born November 13, 1877 and died on July 6 or 9, 1948 at age 70.
  2. Ernest Wilhelm Gummeson, born March 27, 1881 and died December 13, 1941 at 60. Ernest worked in the woods in Minnesota for a few winters and also worked on railroad construction for one summer.In the early 1900’s, he homesteaded in North Dakota, about 20 miles southwest of Estevan, Saskatchewan. Ernest was in Cabri in 1912 working for a railroad contractor, hauling water from Miry Creek to the camp east of Shackleton.He was no doubt encouraged to come to Cabri by his brothers who had established themselves there earlier.Ernest was one of the few settlers to ship in carloads of settlers’ effects including horses, cows, machinery, furniture, etc. Those who had arrived before the railroad
    Ernest Gummeson
    Ernest Wilhelm Gummeson

    was built had to haul their belongings from Swift Current or from Gull Lake. In 1913 they homesteaded on the W 1/2 7-19-18. In 1917, he purchased the Southeast of 13-19-19 from Wesley (Mac) McLean. Most of the homestead was broken with horses and a one furrow sulky plow, but the SE of 13 was broken with a large Twin City tractor and a large breaking plow which was owned by brothers Elmer and Herman Gummeson. His first crop in 1914 was a complete failure due to drought. In 1915 there was an extremely good crop, but in 1916, he was completely hailed out.

    Gustav Herman Gummeson
    Gustav Herman Gummeson

    In 1926, the farm was enlarged with the purchase of the Hudson Bay SW 1/4 8-19-18, and in this year Ernest, together with his brothers Axel and August, purchased a Model P Case Combine. In 1927 Ernest sold his share and bought an IHC No. 8 Combine. Ernest and Esther had three children, Walter, Berenice and Mildred. Ernest served on the Cabri School Board and on the  Cabri United Church Board. He died in 1941, at which time Walter took over the farm.

  3. Gustav Herman Gummeson was born July 24 1879 in Balsam Lake, Polk, Wisconsin, USA and died February 14 1935 in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
  4. Frank Elmer Gummeson was born on March 22, 1883 in Amery, Polk County, Wisconsin, USA. He died on January 11, 1941 at the age of 57 in
    Frank Elmer Gummeson
    Frank Elmer Gummeson

    Cabri, Saskatchewan, Canada. It is believed that Elmer also attended school at Shilo. This was confirmed by Cecil. Elmer’s first residence in Cabri was a small wooden structure. He was a member of the Cabri and District Lions Club Board of Directors as Lion Tamer, starting January 29, 1959.

  5. August Leonard Gummeson was born July 30, 1887. He immigrated to Cabri, Saskatchewan from North Dakota with several of his brothers and sisters and their families to farm on homestead properties. August, together with his brothers Axel and Ernest, purchased a Model P Case Combine. This combine had no grain tank, the grain being elevated into a wagon box which was pulled alongside. The tractors at that time did not have enough traction to pull the combine up some of the hills on his farm, so he pulled it with 12 horses. In 1927 Ernest sold his share to buy an IHC No. 8 Combine. August married Bertha Hanson and they
    August Gummeson
    August Leonard Gummeson.

    lived on August’s homestead, which was only a quarter of a mile south of Cabri. Later they moved into town. On November 23, 1930, August and his wife Bertha celebrated their 10th wedding anniversary and their son Merrill’s first birthday. Nels Peterson (a relative) called him the Ninth Wonder of the World, as he had arrived on their 9th Anniversary. Following an illness that some believed to be Typhus, which he contracted from a contaminated well in Saskatchewan, they relocated to    LaGrande, Oregon, USA from Cabri, Saskatchewan after 1922, along with their foster son Cecil, only to return after about a year. They again relocated to  Chilliwack in August of 1936. One can only assume this was again as a result of his health issues. August was a member of the Hospital Complex Construction Committee for Chilliwack Hospital from April 1950 to after 1956. August died on July 2, 1956 at the age of 68 in Chilliwack, British Columbia, Canada.

  6. Hilda Gummeson
    Hilda Caroline Gummeson

    Hilda Caroline Gummeson was born on June 7, 1889 in Polk County, Wisconsin. She married John MacPherson and they lived in Arcata, California, USA, where she died on June 30, 1979 at the age of 90.

  7. Esther Christine Gummeson was born on September 1, 1893 in Polk County, Wisconsin, USA. Esther married Alex Stewart in Cabri Sask., (or possibly  Wisconsin) March 20 , 1918 and they had 8 children. She died on November 2, 1963 at the age of 70 in Weyburn, Saskatchewan, Canada.
  8. Axel Gummeson
    Axel Gummeson

    Axel Gummeson, born July 15, 1891 in Balsam Lake, Polk, Wisconsin, USA and died November 6, 1962 in New Westminster, British Columbia, Canada. Axel Fredrik Gummeson was born on July 15, 1891 in Polk County, Wisconsin, USA. Axel and his wife Ella, along with their son Kenneth, age 10 weeks, left Amery, Wisconsin, USA by train and arrived in Cabri, Saskatchewan on April 21, 1917. They took up residence at the August Gummeson farm on the south edge of town. Several brothers and a sister of Axel had come to Cabri prior to this time. They had four children, Kenneth, Mazel, Axel Stanley who died in infancy, and Helen.In 1928 Axel bought the NE, NW, and SE of 8-19-18 and the NE of 5-19-18 W 3rd. Axel was an avid curler and hunter, an active member of the Saskatchewan Wheat Pool and a founding member of the Cabri Cooperative Association. In 1945, Axel and Ella retired and moved to New Westminster, British Columbia where Axel died November 6, 1962 at 71 after a lengthy illness.

  9. Luther Emanuel Gummeson was born June 22, 1895 in Amery, Polk County, Wisconsin, USA. Before enlisting for military service on December 10, 1917, he was a Lutheran and a farmer in Vancouver, BC. In June 1918 he was in France. His regimental number was 4080081, he was a Pvt L.E. 7th Battalion of the Canadian (B.E. F.) British Expeditionary Force. He  was 6′ 1 1/8″ in height, with 40″ chest at full expansion, fair complexion, blue eyes and fair hair on December 10, 1917.
    Luther Gummeson
    Luther Emanuel Gummeson

    A description of his physicalmarks at the time of Attestation was “two scars left arm at insertion of deltoid. Scar little finger right hand, one left great toe, one upper lip right.” He died on October 22, 1934 at the age of 39 in Beruryn, Alberta, Canada of unknown causes. Rumour had it that his early death was attributed to being gassed during WWI. Before his death, Luther was living in the Peace River area.

Sources:

  1. August Gummeson tombstone, Cabri Cemetery, Cabri, Saskatchewan, Canada .
  2. 1880 US Census; Gummeson, David; Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin.
  3. ‘Iowa’ Ship’s Roster, 1871; Gummeson, David.
  4. 1910 US Census; Gummeson, Christina; Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin.
  5. Luther Emanuel Gummeson File (Attestation Papers), Archives Canada.
  6. Frank Elmer Gummeson tombstone, Cabri Cemetery, Cabri, Saskatchewan, Canada; Through the Years: History of Cabri and District – Johnson Family; Page 618 (Cabri History Book Committee).
  7. 1910 US Census; Gummeson, Ernest; Gang Creek Township, Williams? County, North Dakota.
  8. Ernest W. Gummeson tombstone, Cabri Cemetery, Cabri, Saskatchewan, Canada.
  9. Informal interviews with various Gummeson family members.
  10. Through the Years: History of Cabri and District – Farm Equipment Operation, Page 24; Chautauqua, Page 39; Hunting, Page 51; Sod Breaking, Page 62; Councillors, Page 70; Dance, Page 75; Credit Union, Page 95; Hospital Board, Page 106-107; Lions Club, Page 113; Orange Lodge, Page 117; Cabri Band Auxiliary, Page 119;   Frank, Page 244-247; Axel and Cecil Gummeson, Page 447-449.

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The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

Originally posted 2017-05-16 12:15:48. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

My favorite and most used US genealogy research links.

 

The following is my extensive list of my favorite and most used US genealogy research links. Although the vast majority of these are free, there are a few paid sites included that I do subscribe to – simply because I find them invaluable.

 

Originally posted 2016-06-23 15:39:29. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Forensic Genealogy: Dead men do tell tales.

 

I tend to use a combination of the more general genealogy research techniques as well as some of those considered to be forensic genealogy.

 

I didn’t even realize I used these techniques or that there was actually a name for them until I read the following article.

 

forensic genealogy
In forensic genealogy – dead men do tell tales.

While the Bermuda Triangle is the end of a journey, the Forensic Genealogy Research Triangle represents the beginning of an ancestral research journey.

History, Geography, and DNA create the perfect equilateral triangle of forensic research. If you must supply documentation for a legal case that requires source citations or written reports, you are now entering the world of forensic genealogy.

When I set out to research this article, I was a tad surprised to see forensic genealogy described as a “modern” approach to family research, as though it were invented yesterday. The practice has been around for quite some time. Only recently has it gotten a sexy name and the respect and appreciation it deserves.

I have heard forensic genealogy described as “the study of kinship and identity as it pertains to the law.”

That’s a good definition, but I prefer professional genealogist Megan Smolenyak’s description – “reverse genealogy” – because in many forensic cases, you begin with the deceased and you look for the living, compared to conventional genealogy, which usually starts with the living and looks for the deceased. (Ms. Smolenyak is the author of Trace Your Roots with DNA.)

A lot of forensic research is figured out by available documentation with science and technology mixed in. The three most important sources of this area of study are:

  1. Photo analysis
  2. Database mining
  3. DNA analysis

 

Research Formula

 

Forensic techniques + conventional research = forensic genealogy

 

In other words, forensic genealogy takes the facts discovered by conventional genealogy and weaves them together to give you an entire picture. It is a relatively modern approach to family research for the legal profession and law enforcement. I’ve heard it referred to as “CSI Meets Roots.”

One of the most common uses for forensic genealogy is to locate missing heirs to estates. This is not a new practice. In fact, Laurie Thompson, a highly respected former Regent of a New York City Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) chapter, provided genealogy research to the FBI and other law enforcement agencies, in addition to finding next of kin, for more than 40 years. She didn’t have the luxury of online databases; she did it the hardcopy way. The answer to a case may be found in a city directory or in hospital or cemetery records. So “high-tech” is not necessary in forensic genealogy, but it sure does help. Where the high-technology comes in handy is with the DNA testing; but in the end, the science must be supported by the analyses of photos and documents.

A short list of areas that are served by forensic genealogy includes:

  • Probate and estate cases
  • Guardianship cases (next of kin)
  • Civil pension, Social Security, or veteran benefits
  • Land issues

 

Experts in the Field

 

Colleen Fitzpatrick

 

Fitpatrick is described as a “real-life CSI detective who has helped crack the most compelling mysteries of our time.” Currently, she is a consulting genealogist for the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory (AFDIL).

Boasting a PhD in nuclear physics, as well as an MS in physics from Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, Colleen Fitzpatrick founded her own high-tech optics company (Rice Systems) in her garage. She subsequently contracted with NASA, the US Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the National Science Foundation, as well as other civil and government agencies.

Fitzpatrick is the author of several best-selling books on genealogy, including Forensic Genealogy, which is considered “The Reference” for the entire profession. Dick Eastman, renowned genealogist and host of his own website Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter, highly recommends her book. Other books by Fitzpatrick include DNA and Genealogy (2005) and Dead Horse Investigation: Forensic Photo Analysis for Everyone, among others.

 

Dee Dee King

 

An expert in the field of forensic genealogy, Dee Dee King serves on the board of the Council for the Advancement of Forensic Genealogy (CAFG); a professional business league. The Council’s website offers valuable research resources, including links to probate codes, bar associations, state rules of evidence, genealogist/attorney relationships, and more. The Council also offers classes, and those who pass the course receive a Forensic Genealogy Institute Certificate of Completion.

Forensic genealogy in short is research, analysis, and reporting in cases with legal implications. It’s mining for research gold, using creative resources outside the realm of conventional genealogy research. It is applying scientific processes to traditional research to arrive at an answer. It is the dead speaking from the grave… “where are you?” Do you hear dead people speaking? If you do, forensic genealogy may be for you.

 

Author: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Nancy_Siddons-Daniels

Originally posted 2016-12-04 07:02:07. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

5 ways to find out more about your ancestors.

 

You would think, since we live in a digital age, we would be more in touch with exactly who we are and where our families came from. There was a time when most UK and western families were comprised of Britons who could trace their lineage back countless generations. Such is the case with our family.

 

Those days are quickly fading into obscurity as more and more people travel the globe and emigrate to new countries, perhaps many times in their lifespan.

 

Are you looking to trace your family tree? You can find out more about your ancestors using these 5 handy tips.

(Featured image above: Lincolnshire Regiment, WWI.)

 

1.   Start with your own immediate family.

 

Family portrait from the mid to late 60's with us girls in coordinating outfits hand made by Mom.
My immediate family portrait from the mid to late 60’s with us girls in coordinating outfits hand made by Mom, c. 1967. (That’s me third from the left, just behind my Mom.)

Sometimes Mom and Dad know more than they’ve shared with you.

Perhaps you were too young and they didn’t think you’d be interested, or they were just too busy with the everyday affairs of raising a family.

Start with your parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles. They might have clues you could easily follow up on!

 

2.   Search photo albums and scrap books.

 

Search photo albums and scrapbooks.

This is another tip you could use right in your own home. Start checking out the family photo albums and scrap books. These might hold clues to ‘unknown’ ancestors you never knew existed.

Sometimes families keep mementos through countless generations and these might hold the real key to your ancestry!

 

3.   Research driving records.

 

Traffic Violator

Whoever would have thought that learning to drive a car would be a way in which some long-lost relative could find you in their family tree?

As you are preparing to take your driving theory test and are making use of online practice tests, just think about how important this might be one day. Not only will passing your driving theory enable you to go on to the practical exam, but some day, that driving licence just might put you in touch with a distant cousin you might never have met otherwise.

They may have more information on ancestors you want to record in your genealogy.

 

4.   Online resources and genealogy chat rooms.

 

Genealogy chat rooms.

One really useful site that many searching their ancestry use is an online chat room at Genes United. Here you can chat with others, post messages that you are looking for a specific branch of the family, or simply talk to others about how they are proceeding in their search.

Other important genealogy research sites are the GenUKI group of sites and the UK GenWeb, Canada GenWeb and the US GenWeb sites, which provide valuable information, tips and hints, and also a ton of links to other valuable resources and sites.

 

5.   Join a family history society.

 

Federation of Family History SocietiesThere are a number of family history societies that you might like to join. Some are small local sites while others have a huge online presence.

Certain church affiliations put a great deal of emphasis on ancestry, so you might find a family history society in your local church as well.

Whether you find information from driving records or from relatives you find online in chat rooms, there are so many ways in which to conduct a search that were never available in previous generations. In fact, there are even DNA testing sites that can tell you if you are a ‘blue blood’ or of mixed ancestry.

The key is to be persistent and record, chart and document everything you learn. There are numerous free or inexpensive software programs that make this easy, leading you through step by step.

Before long, you may even be able to trace your lineage back to the Middle Ages.

Wouldn’t that be fun?

Originally posted 2016-05-18 11:43:07. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Transcription: In Memoriam for Jean X. Roy.

The following is my transcription of the In Memoriam for Jean X. Roy upon his death.

Jean-Xavier Roy Memorial
‘In Memoriam’ for Jean-Xavier Roy.

In loving Memory of

Jean X. Roy

Died December 21, 1979

PRAYER

O GENTLEST Heart of Jesus ever present in the Blessed Sacrament, ever consumed with burning love for the poor captive souls in Purgatory have mercy on the soul of Thy departed servant. Be not severe in Thy judgment but let some drops of Thy Precious Blood fall upon the devouring flames and do Thou O Merciful Savior send Thy angels to conduct Thy departed servant to a place of refreshment, light and peace.

J. N. Boufford and Sons Inc.

_____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

Who’ulda Thought Headstone Hunting Could Be Such Fun?

Although my husband and children all enjoy hunting moose, headstone hunting is about as far as I’ll go.
headstone hunting at Melanson Community Hall
Melanson Community Hall in the town of Melanson. My mother’s maiden name is Melanson.

About six years ago, we decided to take our one and only big family vacation – a three week driving trip from central Ontario to Acadian territories in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

Although this was a planned vacation, it was an opportunity as well to teach the kids something of their Acadian heritage and see the area in which my mother, her family and ancestors lived for generations.

Melanson Mountain Sign, across from the Melanson Community Hall while headstone hunting.
Melanson Mountain Sign, across from the Melanson Community Hall.

We did a lot of sightseeing in places like Moncton to see the tidal bore of the Bay of Fundy, and the Hopewell Rocks where I got a wonderful picture of Erin and Stuart against the rocks at high tide. I’ve since had several people accuse me of having ‘photoshopped’ the photo, but that’s not the case at all.

Other sites along our journey were:

  • Fort Edward and Fort Beausejour, where several of our ancestors were imprisoned during the Acadian Expulsion;
Grand Pré Chapel while headstone hunting.
Grand Pré Chapel.
  • Grand Pré, the site of the meeting in which Acadian men were informed of their imminent expulsion;
  • Melanson village and mountain, the site of the settlement of one original Melanson brother and pioneer, Pierre Melanson and his descendants;
  • Melanson Settlement, the historic site where our ancestor Charles, the other pioneer brother, settled;
  • Fort Anne, where we had the experience of a lifetime, experiencing the highly entertaining ‘Graveyard Tour‘ hosted by Alan Melanson, a distant cousin; our unexpected discovery of an original ‘aboiteau’ from the Melanson Settlement site, a hollowed wooden log with a hinged valve at one end which was used to drain the water from the fields (it had been in storage at North Hills Museum and she took us to see it when she heard me talking about it); and a visit to Ste. Anne University, where the students and staff were very knowledgeable and amazingly helpful, finding a great deal of documentation for my research.
The mysterious aboiteau used by the Acadians found on our headstone hunting trip.
The mysterious aboiteau used by the Acadians to control the water on the marshes where they homesteaded and farmed.

Our most unexpected discovery was at a tiny, charming Catholic church in Argyle, near Yarmouth, Nova Scotia.

When driving through we spotted a graveyard with hundreds of headstones right along side the road, noticing right away that there were some very old headstones in the mix. At my request, Mark stopped the car and we got out to have a look.

Ste. Anne Catholic Church in Argyle, Nova Scotia - headstone hunting trip.
Ste. Anne Catholic Church and graveyard in Argyle, Nova Scotia – where we spent one Sunday morning headstone hunting.

Our plan was that Mark would have the camera, I would have my notebook to write hard-to-read transcriptions, and Erin and Stuart would be the scouts, running ahead, raising their hands and shouting to let us know they’d found a ‘Melanson’ or ‘Fougere’ headstone.

Now this was a really quiet, cool, damp day and we were just waiting for the rain that appeared to be imminent, but that didn’t deter us. We made short work of the task, and went through the vast graveyard in great speed.

It wasn’t long after starting though, that I noticed the cars driving by slowing right down to check us out and see what we were doing. Some actually came to a dead stop in the middle of the road. Upon reflection, I realized how odd we all must have looked – especially the kids, running from headstone to headstone, raising their hands and shouting. Did they think we were playing some kind of game?

As silly as we must have looked, it was a great deal of fun and it’s a trip we all talk of to this day. We’d all love to do it again.

Here’s how to find unindexed records on Ancestry.com .

unindexed recordsNews Flash! Unindexed records are available on Ancestry.com and they can be searched if you know how.

I certainly didn’t realize that Ancestry.com indexing does not include all records until I read a post by Crista Cowan on the <a rel=”nofollow” href=”http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/07/25/browsing-records-on-ancestry-com-video/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ancestry+%28Ancestry.com +blog%29&utm_content=Netvibes” target=”_blank”>Ancestry.com blog.

For this reason, it can pay to view an entire record set for additional information. She includes a video tutorial for browsing full collections on Ancestry. This is a great way to find elusive information that could help get through those brick walls.

photo credit: deflam via photopin cc

Grand Pré is Recognized by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site

As a Canadian, and someone who has been proudly vocal about my Acadian heritage, this was such exciting news.

The announcement was made June 30, 2012 – the day before Canada Day. What a way to celebrate!

Transcription: Acadia, Canada Vital Records (Drouin Collection) 1670-1946.

UNESCO said, “the landscape of Grand Pré encompasses cultural characteristics that are so exceptional they are of importance to present and future generations of all humanity.”

The official designation follows years of dedication and hard work by the community, including Acadians, farmers, local officials, the Mi’kmaq people and the Government of Canada.

Memorial at Grand Pré
Acadian Memorial at Grand Pré.

Grand Pré (literal translation ‘large meadow’) is located at Minas Basin in Nova Scotia, Canada. It was settled by Pierre Melanson, son of the original French immigrants Pierre dit Laverdure and his wife Priscilla Mellanson, and brother to my 8th great grandfather, Charles Melanson. Pierre had relocated to Minas Basin with his family to escape the conflict that was all too frequent at Port Royal.

About 1713, the Acadians living under British rule were subsequently asked to take an oath of allegiance to the British King. Many were not happy with this request and refused to sign, for the most part because they did not want to be forced to take arms against the Mi’kmaq or the French – their own people.

After being promised they would not be forced to take up arms, most Acadians signed a conditional oath in 1730.

When conflict once again arose between England and France in 1744, Halifax became the new capital of the British colony in 1749. Unfortunately, the largest part of the population in Halifax were Acadians, who lived on and farmed the richest farmland in the area.

Grand Pré Chapel
A very old willow on the grounds of Grand Pré Chapel, a descendant of one of the ancient willows that witnessed the sad events of that time.

Wanting to encourage more Protestants to come and settle in the area, personal property and arms were confiscated and many French settlers were captured and imprisoned. Finally, in 1755, the decision was made to expel the Acadians from Nova Scotia.

On August 19, 1755, British troops made the chapel at Grand Pré their headquarters. The Acadian men and boys were ordered to meet there on September 5th, where they were informed them that their personal property was forfeit to the Crown and they and their families would be deported.

This action, treacherous as it was, served the British King well as it left the prime farmlands available for the British Protestants to claim, and virtually eliminated conflict with the French.

Many Acadians escaped to the wilderness as far away as Quebec and lived and survived with the assistance of the Mi’kmaq. Several thousand Acadians that remained were deported to other points including South Carolina, Pennsylvania, Georgia, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, and North and South Carolina. Many families were separated and there were numerous deaths from disease and ship wrecks.

While on a driving tour in Nova Scotia in 2005, we visited Grand Pré and I must say, I’ve never felt anything like the feeling I felt there. It was a glorious sunny day with a slight warm breeze blowing as we walked about the grounds. I felt an intrinsic, deep-rooted sadness and feeling of being ‘home’. I can’t explain it really, I just know how it felt.

Erin and Stuart fell in love with the resident cat in the chapel. Once they picked it up, it snuggled in as close as it could get. So cute.

Erin and kitty in Grand Pré.
Erin holding the resident cat in the Grand Pré chapel.
Stu in the Grand Pré chapel.
Stu holding the resident cat in the Grand Pré chapel.

Transcription: Obituary for Camille Vachon

The following is a transcription of the French text of an obituary for Camille Vachon.

 

Camille Vachon
Camille Vachon

VACHON, Camille

À l’Hôtel-Dieu de Lévis, le  20 juin 1990, à l’âge de 83 ans et 10 mois, est décédé monsieur Camille Vachon, époux de dame Marie-Anna Boily. Il démeurait à Sts-Anges. La famille recevre les condoléances à la salle municipale, 317, des Érables à Sts-Anges, vendredi de 13h 30 à 16h 30 et de 19h à 22h, samedi de 13h à 14h 45. Le service religieux sera célébre le samedi 23 juin, à 15h, en l’église de Sts-Anges et de là au cimetiére paroissial, sous la direction de la Maison.

Armand Plante Inc.
875, Ste-Thérèse
St-Joseph

Il laisse dans le deuil, outre son épouse, ses enfants, gendres et belles-filles: Marie-Laure (Melvine Gagné), Laurent (Annette Drouin), Magella (Marie-Claire Drouin), Reina, Gemma (Laurent Lallamme), Guimond (Françoise Turmel), Thérèse (Adrien Lacroix), Pierrette (Denis Lagrange), ses vingt-deux petits-enfants, ses sept arriéres-petits-enfants; son frère et demi-soeurs: Valère, Germaine (Adélard Tardif), Eva, Iréne (Hermel Doyon), Agathe, Fernand (Jeannine Crenier), Rita (Antonio Labrie), Carmella (Freddy Jolicoeur), Imelda, ses neveus, niéces, cousins, cousines et de nombreus ami(e)s. Pour renseignements, 1-397-6948.

 

ENGLISH TRANSLATION (via Google Translate)

At the Hôtel-Dieu de Lévis, on 20 June 1990 at the age of 83 years and 10 months, Camille Mr. Vachon died, husband of Marie-Anna Boily. He remained in Sts-Anges. Family condolences will be received at the Municipal Hall , 317 Maples Sts-Anges, Friday from 13h 30 to 16h 30 and 19h to 22h Saturday from 13h to 14h 45. The funeral service will be held Saturday, June 23 at 15h, in the church of Sts-Anges and then to the parish cemetery under the direction of the house.

Armand Plante Inc.
875 , Ste- Thérèse
St. Joseph

He is survived by, in addition to his wife, children, sons and daughters, Marie-Laure (Melvin Won), Lawrence (Annette Drouin), Majella (Drouin Marie- Claire), Reina, Gemma (Laurent Lallamme), Guimond (Françoise Turmel), Therese (Adrien Lacroix), Pierrette (Denis Lagrange), twenty- two grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren, his brother and half-sisters: Valere, Germaine (Adelard Tardif), Eva, Iréne (Hermel Doyon), Agathe, Fernand (Jeannine Crenier), Rita (Antonio Labrie), Carmella (Freddy Jolicoeur), Imelda, his nephews, nieces, cousins ​​and numerous friends. For more information, 1-397-6948.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

The largest family tree ever may help with research into genetic traits.

I was amazed to read on the “nature” blog that a genome hacker has discovered what is believed to be the most extensive family tree ever, consisting of 13 million linked individuals.

This family tree was constructed with data from online genealogy sites, and the researchers plan to analyse genetic traits and how they pass from generation to generation. These traits include longevity and facial features.

This ‘largest family tree ever’ will be presented by Yaniv Erlich, a computational biologist at the annual meeting of the American Society of Human Genetics. The data has been stripped of identifying information to protect privacy and has been made available to other researchers.

Nancy Cox, a human geneticist at the University of Chicago states, “We’ve really only begun to scratch the surface of what these kinds of pedigrees can tell us.”

The ability to measure the change in frequency of traits over generations may help to understand to what extent traits are dictated by genetics.

There is concern by some regarding the quality of the largest family tree ever; about using self-reported genealogical data, as pedigrees stretching to royalty and beyond a certain date are not believed to be valid. There is also the problem of quality of sources and simple errors in the entering of data.

Although it is unclear just how useful and accurate these huge pedigrees will be, some enthusiasm and eagerness is being expressed by scientists and they are working to create a specific experiment that could produce useful results.

Genealogy Mystery: Who were Christian W. Keefer’s parents?

Christian W. Keefer (Chester) is an important figure in one of the main branches of my husband’s and children’s ascendancy. He married Mary Ann Jacques and they eventually settled and raised a family in Dodge County, Wisconsin.

After numerous years of research, however, I’m still left scratching my head at the mystery of the identity of Christian W. Keefer’s parents.

As can be seen in the list of sources I’ve found and logged for Christian (below), you would think that at least one of them would provide some concrete information about his parentage and place of birth, but that turns out to not be the case.

Here’s what I know for sure:

Christian W. Keefer was born October 1, 1811 in Pennsylvania and his family originated from France.

Christian W. Keefer's parents.
Sources for Christian W. Keefer.

That’s it.

I originally took a mention of Philadelphia as Christian’s birthplace in a biography of his son Charles with a grain of salt. I do believe that people did and do tend to describe where they’ve come from by using the nearest, largest center that would be recognized outside the area. For example, although we live in Chilliwack, BC, Canada, we frequently say we’re located near Vancouver to those who are not from the area. Considering this possibility, I would not rule out any birth location in Pennsylvania.

I have considered the possibility that our Christian may be one of the Christians mentioned of the Keefer / Kiefer family in the “Biographical Annals of Franklin County”. I was able to systematically eliminate every Christian mentioned because they could not have been born on or near the birth date of our Christian (Chester), or they married into different families, etc.

Another  possibility I’ve been checking is that his father (and possibly mother as well), may have immigrated to the United States from Germany (or Switzerland), but I’ve been unable to find immigration or naturalization records that show such a connection.

However, the same biography previously mentioned states that he was of French origin.

Through all of my research over the years, every Keefer family is of Germanic origin – except one.

The only family that shows of French origin in the time period is (lo and behold!) actually living in Philadelphia and is that of Anthony and Sarah (Shillingford) Keefer.

At the time, his family was very young with only mention of one brother born in 1810 – Thomas. The earlier births of the children of Anthony and his wife Sarah are about one year apart, leaving a gap just where Christian’s would be.

Keefer, Anthony; family pedigree chart
Family pedigree chart of Anthony Keefer, showing Christian, as I’ve entered it in my database (see http://blythegenealogy.com).

I would love to find proof beyond that of coincidence and speculation of Christian W. Keefer’s parentage. I’d like nothing better than to continue further back in time and expand on this huge Keefer family

If you or anyone you know has any documentation, images, etc. of this Christian Keefer showing his parents and brothers and sisters (or parts thereof), I would dearly love to see them, or better yet, get copies.

Sources:

  1. Biographical Sketches of Old Settlers and Prominent People of Wisconsin: Vol. I (Waterloo, Wis., Huffman & Hyer, 1899); pdf file.
  2. State of Ohio, “Ohio, County Marriages, 1790-1950,” marriage, Family Search (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XZ82-6QV: accessed
  3. Death certificate; Charles Keefer;  Digital Folder No.: 4008297; Image No.: 1576; Film Number: 1674527; Certificate No.: cn 23384. (7 June 1933), Illinois Deaths and Stillbirths, 1916-1947, State of Illinois; https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NQCW-SP5.
  4. FamilySearch.org, “Wisconsin Deaths and Burials, 1835-1968,” database, FamilySearch.org, FamilySearch.org (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XL3P-121: accessed ).
  5. Rootsweb, “Wisconsin Death Records,” database, Rootsweb, Rootsweb (http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~keffer/deaths/Wisconsin.htm: accessed ).
  6. Keefer, Christian W., Beaver Dam Argus, Beaver Dam, Dodge County, Wisconsin, , Obituary.
  7. Obituary of Mary Ann (Jaques) Keefer.
  8. 1880 US Federal Census, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, Beaver Dam, Dodge, Wisconsin, enumeration district (ED) Enumeration District: 004, Page: 47A, Year: 1880; Census Place: Beaver Dam, Dodge, Wisconsin; Roll: 1422; Family History Film: 1255422, Keefer Christian W.; digital image, Ancestry.ca (http://blythegenealogy.com : Internet 13 July 2013).
  9. 1870 US Federal Census, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, year: 1870; census place: elba, dodge, wisconsin; roll: m593_1710; page: 165a; image: 338; family history library film: 553209, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, enumeration district (ED) Roll: M593_1710; Image: 337; Family History Library Film: 553209, Page: 164B, Roll: M593_1710; Image: 337; Family History Library Film: 553209, Keefer Christian W; digital image, Ancestry.ca (http://blythegenealogy.com  : Internet 7 September 2013).
  10. 1860 US Federal Census, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, roll: m653_1405; page: 303; image: 308, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, Page: 303, Roll: M653_1405; Image: 308; Family History Library Film: 805405, Keefer Christian W.; dgs no.: 4298900; image no.: 0038; nara no.: m653, Ancestry.ca (http://blythegenealogy.com  : Internet 7 September 2013).
  11. 1850 US Federal Census, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, roll: m432_996;  image: 209, , Page: 104A, Roll: M432_996; Page: 104A; Image: 209, Keefer Christian W.; digital image, Family Search ((http://blythegenealogy.com  : Internet 7 September 2013).
  12. 1840 US Federal Census, Painesville, Lake, Ohio; digital image, Ancestry.ca, Ancestry.ca (http://blythegenealogy.com  : accessed ).
  13. 1830 US Federal Census, Antrim, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, age: 395; nara series: m19; roll number: 151; family history film: 0020625; digitalk image, Ancestry.com (http://blythegenealogy.com  : accessed ).

Transcription: Obituary for Alanson Adams

Transcription of an obituary for Alanson Adams.

Fond du Lac Daily Commonwealth, Page 4

Tuesday, April 26, 1881

Alanson Adams
Alanson Adams

Retrospective

The death of Mr. Alanson Adams of our city on the 23rd instant, is an event of more than ordinary interest.  Born in the year 1792, in the third year of Washington’s first term, his life covers nearly the whole period of our constitutional history.  We are fairly startled at the rapidity of our country’s development, as compared with other countries, when we contemplate its history being crowded into the lifetime of one man.  During this period the small circle of States bordering the Atlantic coast, few in population and impoverished by war, has been enlarged until it now engirdles the continent.  A great nation, ranking among the first in power, wealth and influence has been developed within this comparatively short space of time.  Human life can no longer be said to be short, if we measure it by the achievements comprehended within its.limits.

Mr. Adams is identified with the history of our country in one of the most endearing relations.  Every country venerates the memory of its soldiers.  Especially is this true of a republic, which must depend very largely on the valor and patriotism of its volunteer soldiers for defense. The deceased belongs to that noble band whom our nation delights to honor.  In early manhood, at the call of his country, he entered her service in the war of 1812.  He was in several engagements during this war, among which were the battles of Chippewa and Lundy’s Lane.  At the latter place he was wounded.  Thus another one of the few surviving heroes of this war has been laid away to that rest which no battle call, or shock —–will ever disturb.

But in still another and not less important cause was the deceased identified with the history and progress of our country.  He belonged in the class of pioneers peculiar to our country, and yet sometimes overlooked, and underestimated in making our estimates of the elements entering late American progress.  To this class of our population, essentially nomadic in its character, does our country owe very much of its greatness to-day.  By it has been laid the foundations of that grand super-structure of American nationality which has no parallel in history.  Reared in central Vermont he became identified with the early struggles of that State.  In 1818 he was married.  The union thus formed continued some fifty-four years.  In 1844 with his family, consisting of one son and two daughters, he removed to Ohio.  Here he remained until 1860, when he moved to Wisconsin, where he has since resided.  Since the death of his wife, some ten years ago, he has made his home with his son, E.D. Adams, of our city, where he died.

The deceased was a devoted Christian, having been a member of the Baptist church nearly sixty years.  He will be deeply mourned by the church to which he had endeared himself, and the circle of friends how knew him best.   The sympathies of its many friends are extended to the bereaved family, with the assurance that our loss is his gain.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

Transcription: Attestation Paper for Alfred Turmel

Following is my transcription of the WWI Attestation Paper (front only) for Alfred Turmel.

 

FRONT

……….[??]……….FIRST………………Depot Battalion…..SECOND QUEBEC……Regiment
Regtl. No….3285308….

PARTICULARS OF RECRUIT

(Stamp in right margin of upper third of the form:
REGISTRY, OFFICE
2 QUEBEC REGT.
JAN 30 1919
1/2 Q. R. 1-T-99)

DRAFTED UNDER MILITARY SERVICE ACT, 1917
(Class……………………………)

—————————-

  1. Surname………………………………………………TURMEL……………………
  2. Christian Name……………………………………..Alfred………………………
  3. Present Address……………………………………Sainte Anges de Beauce
  4. Military Service Act letter and number………[?5????]
    • (If man is defaulter, i.e., has not registered under Proclamation, [??????] be stated, together with date of apprehension, or surrender)
  5. Date of birth………………………………………….19 December 1896
    • (town, township or county and country)
  6. Place of birth…………………………………………Ste Anges de Beauce
  7. Married, widower or single………………………Single
  8. Religion………………………………………………..Roman Catholic
  9. Trade or calling………………………………………Farmer
  10. Name of next-of-kin……………………………….Napoleon Turmel
  11. Relationship of next-of-kin………………………Father
  12. Address of next-of-kin…………………………….Ste Anges de Beauce
  13. Whether at present a member of the Active Militia………….NO
  14. Particulars of previous military or naval service, if any………No.
  15. Medical Examination under Military Service Act :-
    • (a) Place…Quebec, P.Q….(b) Date…22-8-18…(c) Category…12

————————-

DECLARATION OF RECRUIT

    I, TURMEL ALFRED, do solemnly declare that the above particulars refer to me, and are true.

Alfred Turmel (Signature of Recruit)

————————-

DESCRIPTION ON CALLING UP

Apparent age………..22………..yrs…………………….mths.
Height………………….5………….ft………………………ins.
Chest measurement
fully expanded…………33……………………..ins.
range of expansion……30 1/2………………..ins.
Complexion………………………..Dark………………….
Eyes…………………………………..Gray………………….
Hair……………………………………Brown……………….

Small print to right of description area:
    Distinctive marks, and marks indicating congenital peculiarities or previous disease.

C. E. Le Blanc Capt.
for [?] Co. 1st DEPOS BATTALION, 2nd QUEBEC REGIMENT.
………………………………………..Depot Btln.
SECOND QUEBEC……………………….Regt.
Place……Valcartier Camp………. Date…….24-8-18……………..

(Stamp on right side of above line: M. S. A.)

Small print in bottom left corner::
M. F. W. 133.
FORM. ?-1?.
1??2-?9-115?.

The BACK of this document is missing from the Archives of Canada.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

Melansons and the Acadian Expulsion

The British conquered Acadia from the French in 1710 and subsequently, the Acadians refused to sign an unconditional oath of allegiance to Britain. At this time, the Acadians and Mi’kmaq formed militia against the British and as a result of what the British viewed as the rebellious actions of some of the Acadians, British Governor Charles Lawrence and the Nova Scotia Council ordered the expulsion of all the Acadians. This action led to the deaths of thousands of Acadians.
The Acadian people were expelled from what are now the provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island between 1755 and 1763 and were deported to Britain, France and other British colonies.

Fort Edward in 1753

Fort Edward, in what was then Pisiguit (Windsor, Nova Scotia) played an important role in the Bay of Fundy Campaign (1755) of the Acadian Expulsion. Fort Edward was one of four forts in which Acadians were imprisoned over the nine years of the expulsion (the others were Fort Frederick, Saint John, New Brunswick; Fort Cumberland; and Fort Charlotte, Georges Island, Halifax).
In the early 1760’s it was illegal for Acadians to reside in Nova Scotia. Families and individuals who had avoided capture in 1755 were imprisoned. The prison lists for Fort Edward between 1761-1762 still exist (For a list of the prisoners see List of Acadian Prisoners – Fort Edward). There was Acadian and Mi’kmaq resistance to the Expulsion. In April of 1757, a band of Acadians and Mi’kmaq raided a warehouse near Fort Edward, killing thirteen British soldiers and, after taking what provisions they could carry, setting fire to the building. A few days later, the same group also raided Fort Cumberland.

Fort Beausejour in 1755

Fort Beauséjour, (later known as Fort Cumberland) is located at the Isthmus of Chignecto in present day Aulac, New Brunswick, Canada. This fort was famous for the Battle of Fort Beauséjour, which was both the final act in the long fight between Britain and France for control of Acadia and the beginning of the final struggle between the two great empires for North America itself. Fort Beauséjour was one of several French forts erected to strengthen the French position in North America against the British.
In 1755, there was a major battle at Fort Beauséjour. It was also the site of the start of the Expulsion of the Acadians and the area was afterward subjected to the resistance of the Mi’kmaq and Acadians. On June 4, 1755, British forces and militia attacked Fort Beauséjour from their base at Fort Lawrence. After taking control of Fort Beauséjour by June 16, 1755, they changed its name to Fort Cumberland. After the capture of the fort, British forces attempted to convince Acadians of the Beaubassin region to sign the oath of allegiance demanded by the British Crown; however the Acadians refused, stating that they would rather remain neutral. Some of the captured Acadians who remained reported that they were forced to help defend Fort Beauséjour. Armed with this information, the British planned and executed the expulsion of Acadians in August 1755.
This event was the start of what would come to be known as the Great Upheaval (le Grand Dérangement) of Acadian society. It commenced with the Acadians in the Beaubassin region. British forces burnt Acadian homes at Beaubassin and the vicinity of the fort to prevent their return. Fort Cumberland became one of four sites in which Acadians were imprisoned during the nine years of the expulsion, including Fort Edward.
Pierre “Parrotte” Melanson was born in 1720 in Port Royal (later Annapolis Royal). Pierre “Parrotte” Melanson and Marie Josephe Granger (my 5th great grandparents) were married on 1 Feb 1746 in Port Royal. Marie Josèphe Granger, daughter of Laurens Granger and Marie Bourg, was born on 12 Jan 1723 in Port Royal. He and Marie Josèphe had six children: Marie-Josèphe, Jean “Janne”, Osite, Pierre, David and Dominique-Pierre. Escaping deportation during the Acadian Expulsion, Pierre, Marie Josephe and their three living children, Marie-Josephe, Janne and David (see below for more information about the children), sought refuge in the Petitcodiac region (today in New Brunswick) from 1755 to 1760. They were captured and subsequently held prisoner at Fort Edward between 1761 and 1763. They then lived as captives in Fort Cumberland, between 1763 and 1768. Their youngest son Dominique-Pierre was born in captivity at Fort Cumberland. Pierre “Parrotte” and his family lived after their release from Fort Cumberland in Minudie, Cumberland County, Nova Scotia, where he died about 1791 at the age of 71. His wife Marie Josèphe remained in Minudie until her death about 1790 at the age of 67.
Marie-Josèphe Melanson was born on 4 Mar 1747 in Port Royal. Marie-Josèphe Melanson and Jean-Augustin Gaudet, son of Augustin Gaudet and Agnés Chiasson, were married about 1767 while in captivity at Fort Edward. They lived as captives in Fort Edward between 1761 and 1763, and then also in captivity in Fort Cumberland between 1763 and 1768. They had nine children: Marie-Madeleine, Isabelle, Marie-Anne “Nannette”, Marguerite, Jean, Marguerite, Pierre, Pélagie and Sauveur and they all settled in Westmoreland County, New Brunswick, Canada.
Jean “Janne” Melanson was born on 12 Aug 1749 in Port Royal. Janne lived as a captive along with his family in Fort Edward between 1761 and 1763. He lived as a captive along with his family in Fort Cumberland, Nova Scotia, Canada between 1763 and 1768. Janne later died in Minudie.  Jean “Janne” Melanson and Modeste “Ursule” Forest (4th great grandparents), daughter of Charles Forest and Marie Chiasson, were married on 20 Nov 1773 in Franklin Manor, Minudie. Janne and Modeste had seven children, Louise “Lizette”, Henriette, Romain “Roma”, Apollonie, Pélagie, Rose Anne and Pierre Melanson (3rd great grandfather).
David Melanson was born in 1755 in Port Royal. He lived as an escapee with his family in Petitcodiac between 1755 and 1761. He lived with his family in Fort Edward between 1761 and 1763 and in Fort Cumberland between 1763 and 1768. David Melanson married firstly Marguerite Leblanc, daughter of Joseph Leblanc and Marie Doiron, about 1776 in Minudie, Cumberland County. They had eleven children: Pierre, Cécile, Rosalie, Dominique, Fabien, Firmin, Brigitte, Joseph “dit Magoune”, Gertrude, Romain “Roma” and François. David became a land owner from land grants in Dorchester Crossing and Scoudouc, New Brunswick. David and Marguerite both died in Memramcook, Westmorland County, she in 1810 and he in 1834. Marguerite is among those originally buried at the old Memramcook parish cemetery that were exhumed and re-interred at the new church’s cemetery (St. Thomas) when it opened in 1840.
David married secondly Anne Nanette Richard, daughter of René “petit René de Beaupré” and Perpétue Bourgeois, on 4 Feb 1811 in Memramcook, Westmorland County. They were granted dispensations for third to fourth degree of consanguinity and a third degree of affinity. She died shortly after their marriage at the age of 44 in Memramcook.
Dominique-Pierre Melanson was born in captivity in Fort Cumberland in 1765 and was captive there along with his family between 1765 and 1768. Dominique-Pierre Melanson and Anne-Rosalie Babin, daughter of Pierre Babin and Madeleine Bourque, were married on 8 Nov 1783 in Franklin Manor, Minudie. They had five children: Apolline, Isabelle, Laurent “P’Tit Laurent”, Franéçois and Anne. Dominique-Pierre died on 11 Aug 1813 at the age of 48 in Memramcook.

Sources:
1. Michael B. Melanson, Melanson – Melancon: Genealogy of an Acadian and Cajun Family (Dracut, Massachusetts: Lanesville Publishing, 2004).
2. “Baptism Records of St-Jean-Baptiste, Port Royal, Acadia,” database, Nova Scotia Archives (http://www.novascotia.ca/nsarm/virtual/acadian/Default.asp).
3. “Marriage Records of St-Jean-Baptiste, Port Royal, Acadia,” database, Nova Scotia Archives (http://www.novascotia.ca/nsarm/virtual/acadian/Default.asp) .
4. “Baptism Records of St-Jean-Baptiste, Port Royal, Acadia,” database, Nova Scotia Archives (http://www.novascotia.ca/nsarm/virtual/acadian/Default.asp) .

Concerned citizens use genealogy to connect Jewish heirs with compensation for family property lost or destroyed in WWII..

holocaust

I love genealogy.

I get so much pleasure and satisfaction from the small breakthroughs that are part of the pursuit of genealogy. This, however, is surely nothing compared to the self-worth and satisfaction felt by those who use their knowledge and experience in genealogy to track down the heirs to compensation for the lost or destroyed property and belongings of their ancestors at the hands of the Nazis.

Can you just imagine how it must have felt to be the one to have sent Cati Holland the email notifying her that she was entitled to compensation from Germany for the store her grandparents had owned.

I learned of her story from this article on the NBC40.net website, and it has inspired me.

Genealogy is such a personal pursuit and it was so wonderful to hear of the hobby possibly having a much broader implication, helping people who may very well have not known they were due anything at all.

If I were approached to help with such a pursuit, I would not hesitate to volunteer as much time (and as much money as I could afford) as is necessary.

These are the stories I like to hear.

photo credit: warein.holgado via photopin cc

Transcription: Marriage record for Chester Keefer and Mary Ann Jaques.

 

Transcription of the Marriage Record for Chester Keefer and Mary Ann Jaques.

 

Transcription of the Marriage Record for Chester Keefer and Mary Ann Jaques.
Transcription of the Marriage Record for Chester Keefer and Mary Ann Jaques.

THE STATE OF OHIO, Geauga County

Personaly appeared Chester W. Keefer and made application for a MARRIAGE LICENSE for himself and Mary Ann Jaques of the township of Munson in said county, and made solemn oath the he the said Chester is of the age of twenty-one years, and the said Mary Ann, is of the age of eighteen years; that they are both single, and not nearer of kin than first cousines; that he knows of no legal impediment against their being joined in marriage.

C. W. Keefer [signature]

Sworn and subscrbed this 5th day of Oct. 1836

Before me,

A. Philips D??? [signature]

 

Larry David and Bernie Sanders are distant cousins | Flavorwire

 

On the fourth season premiere of “Finding Your Roots,” Henry Louis Gates Jr. revealed a match between the Senator and comedian’s DNA.

 

In fact, Larry David and Bernie Sanders are distant cousins.

 

Throughout the three seasons of Henry Louis Gates Jr.,’s PBS series Finding Your Roots, the author and historian has used family ancestry research to track familial connections for celebrities (and between them), with some surprising results.

But few of the show’s revelations have been as predictable as that of last night’s fourth season premiere: that Senator Bernie Sanders and comedian Larry David, who has portrayed him quite convincingly on Saturday Night Live, are related.

Gates and his team were able to make the connection via a long identical stretch in both Sanders and David’s DNA, which indicates cousins.

David, who was hoping for a connection to “a good athlete,” is amused and eventually accepting (“Cousin Bernie!”), while Sanders is unsurprised: “He does a better Bernie Sanders than I do!”

Take a look…

 

Source: Ancestry Non-Shocker: Larry David and Bernie Sanders are Distant Cousins – Flavorwire

Ancient tomb of Santa Claus discovered beneath church.

The Death of St. Nicholas.

Archaeologists in Turkey may be on the cusp of solving a mystery thousands of years in the making after they stumbled on a tomb beneath the remains of an ancient church they believe contains the remains of Saint Nicholas—known popularly as Santa Claus.

 

A portion of the site believed to contain the undamaged grave was discovered in St. Nicholas Church, located in Turkey’s southern Antalya province. The Demre district in which the church can be found is known to be the revered Christian saint’s birthplace.

 

The head of Antalya’s Monument Authority, Cemil Karabayram, told the Turkish press the shrine was discovered during electronic surveys which showed gaps beneath the church.

“We believe this shrine has not been damaged at all, but it is quite difficult to get to it as there are mosaics on the floor,” Karabayram told Cemil Karabayram. In the excavation process, archaeologists will have to loosen each tile from the mosaics and remove them together in a mold.

The claims over the 1,674-year-old remains of St Nicholas would compete with differing narratives that place the original saint’s relics as far away as Italy and Ireland.

Read on…

 

Source: Ancient Tomb of Santa Claus Discovered Beneath Church

Transcription: Marriage Certificate and Register for William Beaver and Mary Elizabeth Fougère

 

Transcription: Marriage Certificate and Register for William Beaver and Mary Elizabeth Fougère.

Featured image: St. Peters, Nova Scotia

Beaver, William & Fougère, Mary Elizabeth; Marriage documents.

Marriage License of William Beaver and Mary Fourgere
No. 440

Province of Nova Scotia
Marriage License

(Signature)
M.B. Daly
Lt. Govn

(Right Margin) –
BY HIS HONOR
Malachy Bowes Daly, Esquire
Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia,
&c., &c., &c.

    Whereas, William Beaver Farmer and Mary Fourgere have determined to enter into the holy estate of Matrimony, and are desirous of having their Marriage publicly solemnized : in order that such their honest desires may the more speedily have due effect, and that they may be able to procure the same to be lawfully solemnized without publication of banns, I do hereby, for good causes, give and grant this License and Faculty, as well to them the said parties contracting, as to all or every Minister or Clergyman resident in the Dominion of Canada and duly ordained or appointed according to the rites and ceremonies of the Church or Denomination to which he belongs, to solemnize and perform the same : Provide always, that by reason of any Affinity, Consanguinity, Prior Marriage, or any other lawful cause, there be no legal impediment in this behalf ; otherwise if any fraud shall appear to thave been committed at the time of granting this License, either by false suggestions, or concealment of the truth, that then this License shall be null and void to all interests and purposes whatsoever.

Given under my hand and Seal at Arms, at St. Peters
this Second day of October
in the year of Our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Ninetynine and in the sixteenth year of Her Majesty’s Command.

Issued this Second day of October 1899

 

R. G. Morrison
Issuer of Marriage Licenses at St. Peters
In the County of Richmond

E. C. Marbank (signature)
Deputy Provincial Secretary

 


 

Beaver, William & Fougère, Mary Elizabeth; Marriage documents.

(Back)
48
Oct. 2, 1899
No. 440, Oct. 2nd 1899
William Beaver
and
Annie Fourgère
MARRIAGE LICENSE AFFIDAVIT
Rich

 


 

Beaver, William & Fougère, Mary Elizabeth (a)

Province of Nova Scotia

MARRIAGE REGISTER

Date of Marriage:  Monday, October 2nd, 1899.
Place of Marriage:  R.C. Church, River Bourgeois.
County:  Richmond Co., N.S.
How Married:  by license or banns:  License
Date of Publication, if by Banns:

Full Name of GROOM:  William Beaver.
His Age:  33 yrs.
Condition (Bachelor or widower):  Widower
Occupation:  Farmer
Residence:  St. Peter’s Lake, C.B.
Where Born: St. Peter’s Lake, C.B.
Parents’ Names:  Edward Beaver, Mary McKay.
Parents’ Occupation:  Fisherman.

Full Name of BRIDE:  Mary Elizabeth Fougère.

Age:  22 yrs.
Condistion (Spinster or Widow):  Spinster
Her Place of Residence:  River Bourgeois
Where Born:  River Bourgeois
Parents’ Names:  Chas. Fougère & Alice Landry

Parents’ Occupation:  Fishing

Witness Names: Michael McDonald, M. Cameron X (his mark), Felicity Burke, Maggie X (her mark) [13 ????]

Signature of parties Married:
William Beaver
Mary Eliz. Fougère X (her mark)

Officiating Clergyman:  A. M. O’Handley, P.P.
Denomination of Clergyman:  Roman Catholic

——

I Certify, That the marriage of the persons above named was duly celebrated by me at the time and place and in the manner stated in this register.
A. M. O’Handley, P.P.
Officiating Clergyman

——

When a marriage is celebrated by License, this register, filled up and signed by the officiating clergyman, must be returned, with the License, to the Issuer from whom the said License was obtained, and the Issuer will pay to the clergyman 25 cents for both Register and License, not 25 cents for each. When the marriage is celebrated by banns, the Register is to be filled up, signed and returned by the officiating clergyman without unnecessary delay to the nearest Deputy Issuer of Marriage Licenses, who is authorized to pay him 25 cents for each Register so returned — the Deputy Issuer repaying himself from License money in his hands — and including amount so paid in his Quarterly Returns. Clergymen may obtain Marriage Registers from Deputy Issuer.
Issuers must return all Licenses, Affidavits and Registers to the Provincial Secretary’s Office, with their Quarterly Accounts.

 


 

Beaver, William & Fougère, Mary Elizabeth; Marriage documents.

Back of Certificate
I hereby Certify, that the within named persons, William Beaver of St. Peter’s, C.B. and Mary E. Fougère of River Bourgeois, C.B. were married under the within License, at River Bourgeois on the Second day of October 1899, according to the Rites and Ceremonies of the Roman Catholic Church
By me,
A. M. O’Handley, P.P.
River Bourgeois, C.B.
In presence of
Michael McDonald
Malcolm Cameron, x Others.

 


 

Beaver, William & Fougère, Mary Elizabeth; Marriage documents.

Form of Affidavit

I, William Beaver of St. Peter’s in the County of Richmond

Occupation
Farmer make oath and say as follows:

I, and Mary Fourchere of Riviere Bourgeois in the County of Richmond

Occupation
…………………………. are desirous of entering into the contract of marriage, and of having our marriage solemnized at River Bourgeois in the

Name of Clergyman
County of Richmond by the Reverend A. M. O’hanley.

Or the said — is of the age of — years or over.
I am of the age of thirty three years, and the said Mary Fourchere is of the full age of         twenty-one years & over.

Bachelor or widower; spinster or widow, as the case may be.
I am a Widower and the said Mary Fourchere is a spinster.
If either party is under 21 years add here the name of the father, mother or guardian of such party.
————– of —— in the County of ———————————
Occupation
whose consent to such marriage is required, has consented thereto —————————————————-
In writing or verbally before me, and if in writing, such writing to be attached to the license;
or
If no person exists whose consent is required by law.
Person under requisite age.
The father and mother of ———————- are dead or absent from the Province, and no guardian has been appointed for
Him or her.
———————–
Sworn to at St. Peter’s in the
County of Richmond
this Second
day of October 1899,
Before me,
R G Morrison
Issuer of Marriage License.

 


 

Beaver, William & Fougère, Mary Elizabeth; Marriage documents.

Envelope
48
Richmond – 1899
Beaver, William
Fougère, Mary E.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

Transcription: Acadia, Canada, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1670-1946 – Page 4 and 5

Transcription: Acadia, Canada, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1670-1946 – Page 4 and 5

 

Acadia, Canada, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1670-1946 - Page 4 and 5
Acadia, Canada, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1670-1946 – Page 4 and 5

 

1836 a 1899
Bouctouche, Cte Kent, N. B.
Paroisse St-Jean-Baptiste
Registres Photographies a la Paroisse

4

——
B.
Olivier Girouard
Le 29 Mars 1836 à Olivier Girouard né le 11 fevrier du legitime mariage de Joseph Girouard et de Judith Doucet. Presens: Urbain Cormier et Elizabeth Girouard.

J. M. Paquet, P. M.

——
M.
Joseph Aucoin & Brigitte Maillet
Le 15 août 1836 après la publication de trois ordinaires des bans de mariage entre Joseph Aucoin domicilié sur l’Ile du Prince Edd et Brigitte Maillet de Richibouctou. J’ai reçu leur consentement mutuel au mariage en présence de Mélème Aucoin et de François Maillet et ce avec le consentement des parents.
J. M. Paquet, P. M.
——
B.
Mélème Nocass
Le 15 août 1836 j’ai supplée les cérémonies du bapteme à Mélème né le 15 mars du legitime mariage de Abraham __ et de Marie Rose Girouard. Présens Fabien Girouard et Domitilde Girouard.
J. M. Paquet, P. M.
——
B.
Michel Cormier
Le même jour à Michel né le 23 juillet du legitime mariage de Eusèbe Cormier et de Scholastique Caissy. Présens: Marin Cormier et Ursule Cormier.

J. M. Paquet, P. M.
——
Sep
Fabien Cormier
Le 16 août 1836 j’ai supplée les cérémonies funéraires au corps du Fabien, enfant legitime de Moyse Cormier et de Perpétue Allain

5

décédé le 7 janvier agé de six mois en présence de François Cormier et du père de l’enfant.
J. M. Paquet, P. M.
——
Sep.
Magdlne Tibodeau
Le même jour à Magdeliane legitime de Olivier Tibodeau et de Suzanne Desroches décédé il y a deux ans le 21 juillet 1834. En présence de Eloi Blanc et Thadée Bastarache agée de 5 ans.
J. M. Paquet, P. M.
——
Sep.
Isidore Bastarache
Le même jour à Isidore Bastarache époux legitime de Rosalie LeBlanc décédé le 28 avril agée de 74 ans. En présence de Athanase Bastarache et Thadée Bastarache.
J. M. Paquet, P. M.
——
Sep.
Angélique Girouard
Le même jour à Angélique Girouard époux legitime de Charls Cormier décédé le 14 juillet agée de 56 en présence de Charls Cormier et de Eloi Blanc.
J. M. Paquet, P. M.
——
B.
Suzanne Savoie
Le 16 août 1836 j’ai baptisé Suzanne née le 8 août 1836 du legitime mariage de Joseph Savoie et de Margte Bourk. Parrain Cyrille Tibodeau et Ursule Savoie.
J. M. Paquet, P. M.
——
Scholastique Blanc
Le 17 août 1836 j’ai supplée les cérémonies funéraires au corps de Scholastique décédée le 20 juin agée de 18 mois legitime de Simon Blanc et…

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

Transcription: Obituary for General George Cadwalader

Following is the transcription of the obituary for General George Cadwalader, published in the Bucks County Gazette on Thursday, February, 6, 1879.

 

Obituary; General George Cadwalader
Obituary for General George Cadwalader

General George Cadwalader died in Philadelphia, on Monday afternoon, in the seventy-third year of his age, from an attack resembling apoplexy, with which he was seized on Sunday night. He was a brother of Judge Cadwalader, who died on Sunday week, and was the last of the five sons of General Thomas Cadwalader. The deceased was born in Philadelphia, in 1806, engaged in mercantile business, and filled the position of President of the Mutual Insurance Company for a third of a century. He served gallantly in the Mexican War as well as in the Slaveholders’ Rebellion, and distinguished himself in both positions. His record is one of the best which he can safely leave behind as a grand inheritance to his family and friends.

___________________

The image of the image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for Leonard Scott Keefer and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

 

Learning to transcribe from ‘ye olde englishe’ and latin.

Transcribing the baptism register from Norfolk, England in my previous post, “Transcription and Translation: Baptism of Elizabeth Stalham and others from the St. George Tombland Church register” was particularly problematic for me, requiring my learning to transcribe from ‘ye olde englishe’ and latin.

 

I am familiar with transcribing in several languages such as German, Swedish, French, etc., even though I do need help from Google Translate.

For this translation, I was able to interpret the text fairly easily, including the months, and the years. At first, I thought there were no days mentioned at all, until I took a closer look and realized there was one small ‘word’ in each entry I couldn’t account for. One thing I did notice was the pattern of repetition within each entry and it’s resemblance to the pattern of repetition to Roman numerals – even if they did appear to be just miscellaneous symbols or text (see image below).

 

Baptism record for Elizabeth Stalham - marked.

 

To confirm my suspicions, I did some research into interpreting Latin dates. It took some time and effort as everything I found at first referred to the date formats used in general, including those used in recording events in genealogy software.

Just as I was about to give up and use my standard ‘????’ in place of the mysterious text since I was unsure of my conclusions, I came upon the following web page that provided the answer I was looking for. They were ‘Reading dates in old English records.’ The following is the verbatim section from the page that specifically provided the answers I was seeking.

The chart below shows some of the different ways numbers may be written.

1 unus, primo, primus, I i
2 duo, secundo, secundus II ij
3 tres, tertio, tertius III iij
4 quattuor, quarto, quartus IV iiij, iv
5 quinque, quinto, quintus V v
6 sex, sexto, sextus VI vi
7 septem, septimo, septimus VII vij
8 octo, octavo, octavus VIII viij
9 novem, nono, nonus IX viiij, ix
10 decem, decimo, decimus X x
11 undecim, undecimo, undecimus XI xi
12 duodecim, duodecimo, duodecimus XII xij
13 tredecim, tertio decimo, tertius decimus XIII xiij
14 quattuordecim, quarto decimo, quartus decimus XIV xiiij, xiv
15 quindecim, quinto decimo, quintus decimus XV xv
16 sedecim, sexto decimo, sextus decimus XVI xvi
17 septendecim, septimo decimo, septimus decimus XVII xvij
18 duodeviginti, octavo decimo, octavus decimus, duodevicesimo, duodevicesimus XVIII xviij
19 undeviginti, nono decimo, nonus decimus, undevicesimo, undevicesimus XIX xviiij, xix
20 viginti, vicesimo, vicesimus, viccesimo, vicessimo, viccessimo XX xx
21 viginti unus, vicesimo primo, vicesimus primus XXI xxi
22 viginti duo, vicesimo secundo, vicemus secundus XXII xxij
23 viginti tres, vicesimo tertio, vicesimus tertius XXIII xxiij
24 viginti quattuor, vicesimo quarto, vicesimus quartus XXIV xxiiij, xxiv
25 viginti quinque, vicesimo quinto, vicesimus quintus XXV xxv
26 viginti sex, vicesimo sexto, vicesimus sextus XXVI xxvi
27 viginti septem, vicesimo septimo, vicesimus septimus XXVII xxvij
28 duodetriginta, vicesimo octavo, vicesimus octavus, duodetricesimo, duodetricesimus XXVIII xxviij
29 undetriginta, vicesimo nono, vicesimus nonus, undetricesimo, undetricesimus XXVIV xxviiij, xxix
30 triginta, tricesimo, tricesimus XXX xxx
31 triginta unus, tricesimo primo, tricesimus primus XXXI xxxi

Numbers may also be written as scores. A score is twenty and is written as XX or xx. If XX is above another number, it would be multiplied by the number under it. Therefore, four score or eighty could be written as XX over IV or xx over iiij as shown below.

XX xx

IV iiij

Sources:

  1. About.com; “Reading and Understanding Old Documents & Records”; Kimberly Powell; http://genealogy.about.com/od/basics/a/old_handwriting.htm.
  2. Family Search; Reading dates in old English records; Document ID: 111804; https://help.familysearch.org/publishing/43/111804_f.SAL_Public.html.

Transcription – Acadia, Canada Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection) 1760-1946, Page 469

 

Original french text from Acadia, Canada Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection) 1760-1946, page 469.

 

Acadia, Canada, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1670-1946, Page 469
Acadia, Canada, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1670-1946, Page 469

CAP PELÉ

CAP BOLD

CTE WESTMORLAND

NB

PAROISSE STE-THÉRÈSE

RÉGISTRES PHOTOGRAPHIES A LA PAROISSE

469

———————-

B    76

M. I. Florine Melanson

Ce meme jour nous prêtre soussigné avons baptisé Marie Isabella Florine née hier du legitime mariage de Judes melanson & Marie Cormier

Parrain Joseph Bourque
Marraine Lea Leger.

JB Th Martineau [ptr?]

———————-

B    77

Jos. Jacob Leger

Ce meme jour, nous prêtre soussigné avons baptisé Joseph Jacob né le 18 Septembre du mois dernier du legitime mariage de Hippolyte Leger & Susanne Leger

Parrain Dedace LeBlanc
Marraine Leonie Bourque.

JB Th Martineau [ptr?]

———————-

B    78

Jos. Honoré Leger.

Ce meme jour, nous prêtre soussigné avons baptisé Joseph Honoré né le 18 Septembre du mois dernier du legitime mariage de Hippolyte Leger & Susanne Leger

Parrain Jos. P. Bourque
Marraine Francoise Cormier

JB Gh Martineau [ptr?]

———————-

S    53

Etienne Bourque.

Ce trent-un Octobre 1894. nous prêtre soussigné avons [????] dans le cimétière de cette paroisse le corps de Etienne Bourque agé de 83 à fils de dy. François Bourque et de Dorothe Downing – Present Jos – Melancon. Max – LeBlanc. &c-

P. Bradley

———————-

S    54

Tilmon Cormier.

Ce [????] Novembre 1894. nous prêtre soussigné avons [????] dans le cimétière de cette paroisse le corps de Tilmon agé de quatorze mois, infant légitimé ce Narcisse Cormier et de Marguerite Dugas – Présent le père de l’enfant – Fred Cormier &c-
B-II-+S-8-M-2- sent Registrar.

P. Bradley

———————-

M     12

Thomas Cormier and Helene Cormier

Ce huit Novembre 1894 apres  la publication de trois bans de mariage faité aux preres de [?] mepes paroissiales entre Thomas Cormier fils [?] de def – Anselm Cormier et de defte Modeste [?]son de Memramcook d’uni part et Helene Cormier veuve de def Ferdinand Cormier de cette paroisse de l’autre part – nous preter soussigné apres avoir [??] leur consentment mutuel [?] mariage leur avons donné la benediction nuptiale en presences des Saul Richard et de Modeste Bourque. Le 4/4 degré d’affinité leur a èté accordé par Mp. de St-Jean.

P. Bradley

———————-

S    55

Pacifique Vienneau

Ce dix Novembre 1894 – nous préter soussigné avons [????] dans le cimétière de cette paroisse le corps de Pacifique Vienneau epoux de Justine Bourgeois agé de souxante onze ans – Presents Hy. Hébert P[??] Vienneau – &c

P. Bradley

———————-

S    56

[??ine] Niles

Ce 15 Novembre 1897 – nous préter soussigné avons [????] dans le cimétière de cette paroisse le corps de [??ine] [??les] décédé hier du legitime mariage de David Niles & Marcelline Babineau Presents le pére de l’enfant & Joseph David Niles.&&&

J.B. Th. Martineau [P?]

———————-

M     13

Joseph J. Aucoin & Odelieme Melanson

Ce huit Novembre 1894 aprés  la publication d’un ban de mariage faite au prone de notre masse paroissiales entre Joseph J. Aucoin veuf de defte Calinat Gallant de l’Ile de Prince Edouard d’une part & Odeliene Melanson fille mineuse de Judes J. Melanson & de defte Rosalie Doiron de cette paroisse de l’autre part. Nous prétre soussigné aprés avoir eccus leur mutuel consentement au mariage. [?] avons donne la benediction nuptiale au presence de Willey Gallant & Marie J. LeBlanc. Ils ont [?????] dispence de deux bans.

———————-

S    57

Patrick Bradley Revd

Ce dix neuf Novembre mil huit cent quatre vingt dix sept nous avons  inhumé dans le cimétiere de cette Paroisse le corps du Revd Patrick Bradley décédé le dix sept du meme mois a l’âge de cinguante huit ans au presence d’un grand concon[?] de monde [???] presence des pretres cidessons soussignes.

Ths. Founale Regd V.G.
Ph. L. Velliveau, ptre
P. P. Duforn ptre
Ed. Nap. Massint, Ptre
D. F. Leger
Jos. A. L’Archeveque [???]
J.B. Th. Martineau [???]
F. C. Jav Merchand, ptre
H. E. C. Cormier
Ed. E. Labbe [???]
H. H. Mea[???] Rv
E. [????] Francis Bradley
J. A. Lapointe

———————-

M     14

Benonie Richard & Marie LeBlanc

Benonie Richard fils [????] de deft Thadde Richard & de [????] Henriette LeBlanc de cette paroisse d’une paft & [????] fille mineuse de deft Ovide LeBlanc & Marie Richard [??? ???] de cette paroisse de l’autre part. Nouse prétre soussigné apres avoir récu leur mutuel consentement du mariage, leur avons donne la benediction nuptiale au presence de Pierre Donnelle & Clotilde Richard. [????] obtense despence d’un ban [???] 2/3 degré de consanguinite.

J. B. Th. Martineau, Ptre.

__________

English translation via Google Translate of Acadia, Canada Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection) 1760-1946, page 469.

 

CAP PELE
CAP BOLD
CTE WESTMORLAND
NB
STE-THERESE PARISH
REGISTRIES PHOTOGRAPHS A PARISH
469
———————-
B 76
Mr. I. Florine Melanson
That same day we the undersigned priest have baptized Isabella Marie Florine born yesterday of the legitimate marriage Judes melanson & Marie Cormier
Godfather Joseph Bourque
Godmother Lea Leger.

JB Martineau Th [ptr?]
———————-
B 77
Jos. Jacob Leger
That same day, we the undersigned priest have baptized Joseph Jacob was born on September 18 of the last month of the legitimate marriage of Hippolyte Leger Leger & Susanne
Godfather Dedace LeBlanc
Leonie godmother Bourque.

JB Martineau Th [ptr?]
———————-
B 78
Jos. Honoré Leger.
That same day, we the undersigned priest have baptized Joseph Honoré born September 18th of last month the legitimate marriage of Hippolyte Leger Leger & Susanne
Jos sponsor. P. Bourque
Godmother Francoise Cormier

JB Martineau Gh [ptr?]
———————-
S 53
Etienne Bourque.
This trent-October 1, 1894. We, the undersigned priest have [????] in the cemetery of this parish Etienne Bourque body aged 83 to son dy. François Bourque and Dorothe Downing – Present Jos – Melancon. Max – LeBlanc. & C-
P. Bradley
———————-
S 54
Tilmon Cormier.
This [????] November 1894. We the undersigned priest have [????] in the cemetery of this parish the body of Tilmon aged fourteen months, the infant legitimized Narcisse Cormier and Marguerite Dugas – Present the father of Child – Fred Cormier & c-
B-II-8-S + M-2 feels Registrar.

P. Bradley
———————-
M 12
Thomas Cormier and Cormier HeleneThis November 8, 1894 after the publication of three banns faite to preres of parish mepes between Thomas Cormier son def [?] [?] – [?] Anselm Cormier and his defte Modeste Memramcook uni either Helene Cormier def Ferdinand Cormier widow of this parish on the other hand – [?] lend us after having undersigned [??] mutual CONSENT marriage gave them the nuptial benediction in presences of Richard Saul and Modeste Bourque. The 4/4 degree of affinity summer Kitzbühel has granted them by Mp. St-Jean.
P. Bradley
———————-
S 55
Pacific Vienneau
This Nov. 10, 1894 – We, the undersigned have pret [????] in the cemetery of this parish Pacific body Vienneau husband of Justine Bourgeois-old souxante eleven years – Presents Hy. Hébert P [??] Vienneau – & c
P. Bradley
———————-
S 56
[?? Ine] Niles
This Nov. 15, 1897 – pret we have undersigned [????] in the cemetery of this parish the body of [?? ine] [?? the] died yesterday of legitimate marriage of David Niles & Marcelline Babineau Presents the father of Child & Joseph David Niles. &&&
J. B. Th. Martineau [P?]
———————-
M 13
Joseph J. Aucoin & Odelieme Melanson
This November 8, 1894 after the publication of a marriage ban made in our parish prone mass between Joseph J. Aucoin widower defte Catinat Gallant of Prince Edward Island one hand & Odeliene Melanson daughter of miner Judes J. Melanson & defte of Rosalie Doiron of this parish of the other. We, the undersigned priest, after having eccus their mutual consent to marriage. [?] Have given the nuptial blessing in the presence of Willey & Marie Gallant J. LeBlanc. They [?????] pantry of two banns.
———————-
S 57
Revd Patrick Bradley
This ten Nov. 9 thousand eight hundred ninety seven we buried in the cemetery of this parish the body of the Revd Patrick Bradley died September 10th of the same month at the age of eight years cinguante presence of a large concon [? ] people [???] presence of priests cidessons undersigned.
Ths. Founale Regd V. G.
Ph. L. Velliveau, Epistle
P. P. Duforn Epistle
Ed. Nap. Massint, Ptre
D. F. Leger
Jos. A. The Archbishop [???]
J. B. Th. Martineau [???]
F. C. Jav Merchand, Epistle
H. E. C. Cormier
Ed. E. Labbe [???]
H. H. Mea [???] Rv
E. [????] Francis Bradley
J. A. Lapointe

———————-
M 14
Benonie Richard & Marie LeBlanc
Benonie son Richard [????] of deft Thadde Richard & the [????] Henriette LeBlanc of this parish of TFAP & [????] miner daughter deft Ovide Marie LeBlanc & Richard [??? ???] Of this parish of the other. Nouse undersigned priest have recov after their mutual consent to marriage, have gives them the nuptial benediction in presence of Pierre Richard Donnelle & Clotilde. [????] Obtense Despence a ban [???] 2/3 degree of consanguinity.
J. B. Th. Martineau, Ptre.

____________________

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