All things history and genealogy.

All things history and genealogy.

Category: Religion

Transcription: Baptism record for Jacques Labelle (and others).

Following is the baptism record for Jacques Labelle (1688) and other records from the same page of entries. Unfortunately, the image is of very poor quality and a good portion of the page is indecipherable.

 

Feel free to forward any new information and/or corrections to help with this transcription.

Parish records for Mere Ste. Eglise, Lachenaie, Quebec

De Marain qui ons declare ???????? ?????? ni liguer du ????????????? Liliane Bord???????

Baptism record of Jaques Labelle (1688)..
Baptism record of Jaques Labelle (1688)..

__________
J. Penan et JB Bourgeois
Le ?????????? du Mars 1688 apres les ????????? ?? lapublication du bane faire d’autre Jean Penan dit la fleur soldat dela Compagniedes Mr. de Vergois age de vint cinq ans fils de Mathurin Penan et de MarieRobert les pere ???? dela ville le quint??? Eusebe de Cournouaille d’une pereest Francoise Bourgeois agee de quatorze ans fille de M?????? Bourgeois et de???????? Clire Carpentier de lisle de Jefrey Eusebe de que ??? d’autre ???? ne??? ???? ?????? aucun?????????? Legitime le sousigne juristre Cure Lachenay ai ???? leur ?????? ??????????? pere ??????? de present ?? leur ?? donne laCanad????? Nuptiale ????? la forme det????? Mere Ste Eglise en presence de JeanChevalier et de Nicolas Bourgeois pere Julie Bourgeois et Guillaume Label -??????? ???? le de ??? ?? qui ons ???? declare ???????? ????? ???????? ???????????????? ??? ???? Lord ??????.
__________
Louis Froger et Elizab. Estier
Les deuxieme ???? de Mars 1688 apres les ????????? et lapublication des banes faire d’entre Louis Froger age ????????? an fils dedessimes Nicolas Froger et Marie Madeleine Martin les pere et mere delaparoisse de la Chenay, courche de quatre June pere et Elizabeth Estier fillesde Leonard Estier et de Elizabeth Gaud??? Les pere et mere des meme paroisse et ??????? ?? ?????? ?????? ????? ????????????.
__________
Jean Miloin
Le septieme de mois de mars dela 1688 en ????? dans la Commission ??????? Mere Ste Eglise Jean Million ??????? dela Chenay, apre avoir ???? ??? les ???????? ?? ??? ?????? dans le ?????????? ?? ?? ?? paroisse lejour suivant en presence de Laurent Estier et Jacques Froger ??? ????? qui onsdeclare ne ??????? ????? ???????? ???? ????? ?????? ???????????.
__________
Baptism of Jacques Labelle
Le vint deuxieme du Mars 1688 ???? ??? pretre Cure De la Chenay, ????? baptize Jacques fils de Guillaume Labelle est Anne Charbonneau,la femme nai les ?????????? de meme, mais ?? ??. ????? ??? ????? Jacques de Castellane ??????? ???? de ??????? ?????? ???? Compagne du ?????????? ???? marine, la Maraine Marguerite Minson et le ? parain signe ? pere et Madame ondeclare ne ??????? ?????? ?? signer ??? ??????????? ?????? ??????? ????legitime ?? soussigne paroisse Cure de la Chenay ?? pris leur ????????????????? par para???? De ??????? et leur aid donne la Canadi????? Nuptial ????la forme du ???? Mere Ste. Eglise en presence de Francois Cottineau lui dela et??? ? Jean Froger pere And. Froger ?? ????? ??????? ?? de Leonard Estier pere??? Francois Estier on le dela ?. Estier qui ??? ???? declare ????????? ???????? signer ???? ??????????? Susanne Cordonnaire.

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You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

A Primer on Cemetery Research to Find Ancestors

Cemetery research absolutely is one of the most valuable tools for genealogy research.
Although I’m pretty much housebound and don’t get out much now, there was a time when I did venture out and do research in places such as cemeteries. As a matter of fact, I previously wrote about one experience at an old Catholic cemetery in Nova Scotia where I and my family spent the better portion of a day checking out the burial sites of our ancestors – and there were bunches of ’em.

By Jillynn Stevens, Ph.D., MSW

Grave Tombstone of Marguerite Melanson.
Cemetery research led to the discovery of Marguerite Melanson’s burial site.

When you’re working on researching distant generations of ancestors, cemetery research is one of the most satisfying, hands on forms of genealogical exploration you can do. It’s one way to connect with a tangible reminder of particular ancestors, which is often an elusive feeling. Finding a tombstone or other sign of the resting place of an ancestor can give you insights into who they were. Is their tombstone humble or grand? Does it contain an inscription that speaks of a simple life, of one that hints at a great love story, or a somber and religious disposition? What dates are inscribed? The information source is rich, yet locating cemeteries and navigating the research process isn’t always straightforward. Here’s how to get started with genealogical cemetery research.

What can I expect to learn from a cemetery?

It’s important to note that cemeteries and grave markers can be excellent sources of information about the deceased. While they are not primary information sources, they can clarify details such as:

An ancestor’s name, including obscure details like maiden names and middle names or even occasionally pet names, but most often:

  • date of birth
  • date of death
  • the names of family members including parents, spouses, and children
  • religion
  • military service
  • fraternal order membership

Cemeteries are a wonderful source of information that can confirm what you’ve learned from earlier research. In other cases, you’ll garner information that you didn’t know. For example, there may be symbolism on a tombstone suggesting that your ancestor was a member of the Masonic Lodge or perhaps they are buried in a Catholic burial ground. Each of these small clues can open up new avenues for research and exploration.

Transcription: Obituary for Carolyn Alma Hodgson (nee Johnson)

Following is my transcription of the obituary for Carolyn Alma Hodgson (nee Johnson), who died in Cairns, Australia. A memorial service was held in Bethel Lutheran Church in Brush Prairie, Washington on August 27, 1995.

Carolyn Alma Hodgson ObituaryCarolyn Alma Hodgson

A memorial service will be at 2 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 27, 1995, in Bethel Lutheran Church in Brush Prairie, Wash. Mrs. Hodgson died of a ruptured aorta Aug. 19 in Cairns, Australia, at age 52.

She was born March 14, 1943, in Becker County, Minn. Her maiden name was Johnson. She moved to the Northwest in 1957 and graduated from Central Washington State College. She married Donald L. Hodgson on June 18, 1966. They lived in Beaverton, and she taught at Oregon Episcopal School and worked for ‘Timberline Lodge.

They moved to Papua New Guinea in 1982.

Surviving are her husband; sons, Eric of Dallas, Texas, and Fernando of Gresham; daughters, Anaka of Bradleboro, Vt., and Leyla Bartruff of Troutdale; mother Esther Johnson of Battle Ground, Wash; sister, Alice Olsen of Battle Ground; brothers, Stanley Johnson of Arlington, Wash., and Arvid Johnson of Battle Ground; and four grandchildren.

Disposition by cremation.

Remembrances: Lae Hospital Save the Children Fund, in care of Bethel Lutheran Church, 12919 N.E. 159th, Brush Prairie, Wash. 98606.

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The image of the obituary for Carolyn Alma Hodgson above links directly to the transcription of the document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data on this site is available for free access and download.

Transcription: Obituary for Margaret Ducharme (Peggy Ducharme).

Transcription: Obituary of Margaret Ducharme
Transcription: Obituary of Margaret Ducharme

Following is the obituary for Margaret Ducharme, who died 1998 in Jaffrey, New Hampshire. Unfortunately, I have no indication of which newspaper published this obituary.

 

She has also been known as Peggy Ducharme, Margaret Bourgeois, Peggy Bourgeois, Margaret Y. Bourgeois, and finally, Marie Marguerite Yvette Bourgeois.

Margaret Y. Ducharme

Margaret Y. “Peggy” Ducharme, 82, of Manchester, died July 21, 1998, in her daughter’s Jaffrey home after a lengthy illness.

Born in Canada on Aug. 4, 1915, she was the daughter of Emile and Marie (Turmel) Bourgeois. She lived most of her life in Manchester.

Mrs. Ducharme worked 15 years for Hillsborough County Home. In addition. she worked for Pandora.

She was a communicant of St. Raphael Church.

Family members include two daughters. Muriel Ducharme of La Prairie, Quebec, Canada, and Mrs. Michael (Sylvia) McElhinney of Jaffrey; a sister, Antoinette Marois of Manchester; a brother, Albert Bourgeois of Andover; nieces and nephews.

SERVICES: A calling hour is Friday from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. in Lambert Funeral
Home. 1799 Elm St. corner of North Street, Manchester.

A Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated Friday at ll am. in St. Raphael Church. Burial will be in Mount Calvary Cemetery.

Memorial donations may be made to Hospice at HCS, Community Lane. Peterborough 03-158.

______  Accessing Original Documents and Data ______

The image of the “Obituary for Margaret Ducharme” links directly to the document transcribed. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, click on the name link, or search the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on this site is available for free access and download.

Transcriptions: Marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson – II.

Transcriptions: Documents relating to the marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson.

 These documents are a continuation of Part I of this post.

—————-

No. 1462

MARRIAGE LICENSE

—————-

PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA

D. MacKeen

Lieutenant-Governor

BY HIS HONOUR

The Honourable David McKeen

Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia.

Whereas, Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson  have determined to enter into the holy estate of Matrimony, and are desirious of having their Marriage publicly solemnized ; in order that such their honest desires may the more speedily have due effect, and that they may be able to procure the same to be lawfully solemnized without publication of banns. I do hereby, for good causes, give and grant the License and Faculty, as well to them the said parties contracting, as to all or every Minister or Clergyman resident in the Dominion of Canada and duly ordained or appointed according to the rights and ceremonies of the Church or Denomination to which he belongs, to solemnize and perform the same with the Province of Nova Scotia ; provided always, that by reason of any Affinity, Consanguinity, Prior Marriage, or any other lawful cause, there be no legal impediment in this behalf ; otherwise if any fraud shall appear to have been committed at the time of granting this License, eight by false suggestions, or concealment of the truth, that then this License shall be null and void to all intents and purposes whatsoever.

Given, under my hand and Seal at Arms, at Halifax,

By his Honour’s Command

F. F. Mathers

Deputy Provincial Secretary

Issued this 16th day

May 1916

A. J. MacCuish

Issuer of Marriage Licenses at St. Peters

In the County of Richmond


Marrage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

I Hereby Certify, That the within named persons, Clifford Carter of Sampsonville and Elizabeth Sampson of Sampsonville were married under the within License at Sampsonville on the twentieth day of  May 1916, according to the rites and Ceremonies of the Catholic Church

By me, (undecipherable)

St. Peters

In presence of Vernon Sampson at Sampsonville in the County of Richmond Mattie Samspon of Sampsonville in the County of Richmond


marrage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

Province of Nova Scotia

—————-

MARRIAGE REGISTER

Date of Marriage ; May 20th 1916

Place of Marriage ; Sampsonville

County ; Richmond

How Married ; by License or Banns;License

Dates of Publication, if by Banns ; 

Full name of Groom ; Clifford Carter

Age ; 20 years

Condition (Bachelor or Widower) ; Bach

Religious Denomin ; Catholic

Occupation ; Farming

Residence ; Sampsonville

Where Born ; 

Names of Parents ; Finlay Carter, Mary Fougere

Occupation of Parent ; Farming

____________________;

—————-

Full name of Bride ; Elizabeth Sampson

Age ; 16 years

Condition (Spinster or Widow) ; Spinster

Religious Denomin ; Catholic

Her Place of Residence ; Sampsonville

Where Born ; Sampsonville

Names of Parents ;  Vernon Sampson, Eliza Lawry

Occupation of Parent ; Farming

Names of Witnesses          Maphis Sampson, Vernon Sampson

Signature of Parties Married          Clifford Carter, Elizabeth Sampson

Officiating Clergyman         ???? L. McDonald

Denomination of Clergyman          Catholic

I Certify, That the marriage of the persons above named was duly celebrated by me at the time and place and in the manner stated in this Register.

???? L. McDonald

Officiating Clergyman

When a marriage is celebrated by License or Certificate, this Register filled up and signed by the officiating clergyman, must be returned with the License or Certificate, to the issuer from whom the said License or Certificate was obtained, and the issuer will pay to the clergyman 25 cents for License, or Certificate, and Register, not 25 cents for each, repaying himself from the money in his hands belonging to the Department and including amount so paid in his Quarterly Returns.

Issuers must return all License, Certificates, Affidavits and Registers to the Provincial Secretary’s Office, with their Quarterly Accounts.

marrage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

—————-

The complete original scans of any documents clips linked above can be accessed by clicking the images. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, search using the linked names above or the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link, both in the left sidebar. It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on these sites is available for free access and download.

Transcription: Obituary for Harold Everett Redetzke; 1935 – 2002

Harold Everett Redetzke+ + + + OBITUARY – HAROLD EVERETT REDETZKE + + + +

May 18, 1935 – October 12, 2002

Harold Everett Redetzke, age 67, died on Saturday, October 12, 2002 at his home in rural Sebeka, MN. Harold was born to Elmer and Margaret (Kimball) Redetzke on May 18, 1935 in Butler Township, MN. Harold was united in marriage to Norma Eckert on June 8, 1957 in Sebeka, MN. They lived in Foxhome, MN for several years and then moved beck to Sebeka where Harold tanned until retirement. Harold served on the Red Eye Township Board for a few years and was a member of Our Saviour‘s Lutheran Church. Harold underwent heart transplant surgery on September 27, 1987 at the University of Minnesota Hospital.

Redetzke, Harold Everett; MemorialHarold is survived by his wife Norma Redetzke of Sebeka, MN, to their union were born five children; two daughters, Diane Steinkraus and her husband Ronnie of Sebeka, MN, Debbie Redetzke of Lincoln, Nebraska; three sons, Myron Redetzke and his wife Pam of Sebeka, MN, Marvin Redetzke and his wife Lori of Sebeka, MN, Calvin Redetzke and his wife Joni of Sebeka, MN; seven grandchildren, Lacey Eckman and her husband Justin, Shawn Redetzke, Jeremy Redetzke. Levi Steinkraus, Evette Steinkraus, Reid Redetzke, and Logan Redetzke; five sisters, Delilah Hasbargen of Frazee, MN, LaVern Milbradt of Sebeka, MN, Donna Super and her husband George of Menahga, MN, Joyce Slininger and her husband Bill of St Cloud, MN, Darlene Hought and her husband Konnie of Foxhome, MN; two brothers, Marlyn Redetzke and his wife Joyce of Sebeka, MN, Donald Redetzke and his wife Roseann of Ely, MN; and many nieces, nephews and cousins. He is preceded in death by his parents, brother Gordon, infant sister Mavis and nephew Corey Hought.

[Handwritten: ‘Herbert Redetzke (Bro.)’]

Memorial Services were held on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 at 1:30 P.M. at Our Saviour‘s Lutheran Church in Sebeka, MN with Reverend Mark Manning officiating. Organist was Hilda Mary Schoon and congregational hymns were “In the Garden,” “Precious Lord, Take My Hand” and “Softly and Tenderly Jesus is Calling.” Honorary Pallbearers were Glen Kimball, Randy Redetzke, Daniel Besonen, Ryan Milbradt, Larry Huotari, Benny Olson and Gerald Olson. lnurnment will be at Green Hill Cemetery at a later date. Arrangements by Cardini — Behrens Funeral Homes of Sebeka and Menahga, MN.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

WWII art thefts documented in recently recovered diary of Alfred Rosenberg.

WWII art thefts
The nazi military and culture resulted in a great many WWII art thefts.

A lingering mystery from the second world war is where are the artworks missing as a result of the WWII art thefts?

One of my earliest memories is from when I was about five years old, shuffling through a small stack of black and white postcards my parents had collected of Hitler’s compound and bunker, and some of the concentration camps.

I was fascinated because my parents had told me what I could understand about the second world war, most likely fostering my ongoing fascination with war, history and genealogy.

I was born in July of 1959, just fourteen years after the end of WWII, and the war was still very fresh in everyone’s mind – including my parents’. Mom had travelled to Germany in 1958 to marry my Dad, who was posted with the Canadian military, and live with him in a tiny apartment in Baden Soellingen – where I was born just a year later. My Dad was quite an amateur photographer and they spent most of their free time travelling around Europe, including visiting the most memorable and disturbing landmarks of Hitler’s regime up to and including the second world war.

The stories my Mom and Dad told of their landlords and others they got to know while living on the German economy painted a picture of lovely, warm, welcoming people, as described in a post on my personal blog, Feathering the Empty Nest, “Did my birth break a curse?” There was no way I could reconcile these stories with the ones I was hearing about the Hitler regime (the military and politicians) of the time. How could there be such a dichotomy?

Among the numerous unspeakable acts against the Jews was the systematic theft of valuables including cash, jewelry, and works of art. Alfred Rosenberg managed the thefts and documented the entire endeavor in his diary.

This morning I read an article in Prologue: Pieces of History on the National Archives site called “Nazi Art Looter’s Diary, Long Missing, Found and Online for the First Time” about the availability online of this German language diary, which was recovered recently and moved to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

I only hope that Mark’s and my interest in the events of WWII has made enough of an impact on our kids that they will do their part to ensure the tragic consequences of the madness of one man and his regime will never be forgotten in their generation and that of their children to come.

Source:

Hilary, “Nazi Art Looter’s Diary, Long Missing, Found and Online for the First Time,” National Archives, http://blogs.archives.gov/prologue/.

Photo credit:

photo credit: x-ray delta one via photopin cc

Transcription of the memorial stone for the priests of St. Roch Church, Quebec

The following is my transcription of the memorial stone for the priests of St. Roch Church, Quebec City, Quebec in Canada. It lists the head priests and the beginning and end dates of their terms.

Priests of St. Roch Church, Quebec
Priests of St. Roch Church, Quebec

 

??????????? cures de
ST. ROCH
Seigneur ????????? ??? le repos
et la lumiere eternelle
Jean Bro; 1787-
Antoine Desforces; 1787-1793
Chs. Duchouquet; 1793-1796
Jerome Raizenne; 1796-1831
Augustin Tessier; 1831-1832
Laurent Aubry; 1832-1835
Frs. de Bellefeuille; 1835-1836
Thomas Pepin; 1836-1840
J.Bte Labelle; 1840-1855
Etienne Hicks; 1855-1857
Moise Brassard; 1857-1874
Thomas Dagenais; 1874-1904
L. F. Bonin Changine; 1904-1923
J.Bte Desrosiers; 1923-1927
Elie Poitras; 1927-1933
J.O. Frechette; 1933-1951
Mathias Piette; 1951-1964
Leo Heneault; 1964-1971

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

Debate about numbers, percentages and odds in genealogy fascinates.

inbreedingThere will always be debate about numbers, percentages and odds in genealogy.

I am so lucky that we have such a wide range of ancestries and national origins in my husband’s and my family trees. Those who have read my posts before are already well aware that our ancestries branch off from four (or five) distinct groups, and marriage between these groups is rare.

The groups containing our ancestries are:

MY ANCESTRY

  • Acadians

French Huguenots escaping religious persecution in France in the mid to late 17th century relocated to the Atlantic coast of Canada and the United States, giving birth to the Acadian and Cajun cultures.

  • French Canadians

You would think, since the origins of French Canadians are essentially the same as the Acadians, there would be more intermarriage between the two, but I have found very few connections between the two groups in our family tree – at least so far. Most French Canadians descended from French explorers and pioneers involved in the fur trade and colonizing what is now part of Ontario and Quebec, although Acadians did find their way up the St. Lawrence River after the great expulsion (grand dérangement) of the French settlers by the British colonists.

MARK’S ANCESTRY

  • Scandinavian

Although the majority of the ancestry of my husband on his mother’s side is Swedish, the other Scandinavian nations and cultures are represented as well.

  • Welsh Quaker

Mark’s ancestry on his father’s side originates from Welsh immigrants who were also escaping religious persecution for their puritan beliefs at the hands of the Welsh and British nobility and clergy.

  • British Royalty and Nobility

The interesting point to make here is that Mark’s connections to British royalty and nobility occur through his Welsh Quaker ancestry.

I decided to touch on this subject after reading the post on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter entitled, “Man Traces Ancestry to 1st English King – So What?.”

Mathematically, Dick Eastman’s calculations of the numbers of ancestors and/or descendants in a family based upon an average number and length of generations, as well as an average number of children in families appear to make sense. However, there are so many variables affecting the numbers, that it is almost impossible to make accurate estimations, much less calculations.

These variables include:

  1. Individuals who remained single and bore no children.
  2. Individuals who died young and were never married, much less had children.
  3. Mass deaths due to war, disease and poverty wiping out most or all of a generation or two.
  4. Variations in sizes of families as influenced by tradition or custom, health and fertility, relationships, economics, etc.

One major point made by Dick is his belief that everyone can eventually trace their ancestries back to royalty, but by my experience, this appears to be flawed.

As illustrated in the diverse groups outlined above in our ancestries, we originate from several unique national, ethnic, and socio-economic groups. Examining our family tree makes it apparent that intermarriage between these groups was almost impossible due to geography, economics, politics and custom. Most people, no matter where they were from or how wealthy and socially prominent they were, usually married within their own group.

The interesting point illustrated by our ancestry is that although my husband’s and my ancestries are quite separate and rarely intermarried, the fact that he and I married and had our two children now combines our ancestries for all future generations. Therefore, it’s easy to assume that intermarriage occurred (and will occur) much more as the world became smaller through technology, multi-culturalism, etc., which are more modern phenomena of the last hundred years or so.

In previous posts, I touched on this subject as it relates to our ancestry and evolving cultural methods of managing relationships and marriages to ensure as little inbreeding as possible. These posts are “The Science of Husbandry on a Human Scale” and “Ingenius incest prevention app created by University of Iceland students.

I must thank Dick Eastman as his is one of the few blogs I do read that routinely challenge my thinking and assumptions. I like that.

photo credit: wonker via photopin cc

Transcription: War Diary of the 73rd Canadian Infantry Battalion for the Vimy Ridge Disaster of March 1-3, 1917.

In honor of today’s ceremonies remembering the anniversary of the battle at Vimy Ridge, I am reposting several articles about my own ancestors who died in WWI. 

 

In my father’s French Canadian, ‘Turmaine’ branch of the family, we have two known soldiers who died in the first world war. The first was my grand uncle, Pte. Joseph Philias Albert Emery who died at Vimy Ridge, and the second was another grand uncle, Pte. Joseph Turmaine, who died at Courcelette.

 

The following is my full transcription of photocopies of the handwritten pages of the war diary of the 73rd Canadian Infantry Battalion for the Vimy Ridge Disaster of March 1-3, 1917, during which my great uncle Joseph Philias Albert Emery went missing in action.

 

1917    

 

Vol. VIII, Page I

  • March 1st
73rd Battalion War Diary
73rd Battalion War Diary – page 1.

Battalion in the lines on its regular frontage.
At 12.05 AM code message was received from the 12th Canadian Infantry Brigade to the effect that the Gas Attack and consequent Infantry Attack, which had been postponed for several days, would take place that morning. This was immediately communicated to the Companies also in code, and preparation for the assembly commenced. At 2.00 am Battalion Headquarters moved to Advanced Battalion Headquarters off UHLAN C.T. where comunication was established with Advanced Brigade Headquarters, and with both points of assembly. “B” and “D” Companies moved up from ARRAS ALLEY and asembled in dugouts in LIME STREET, dugouts on TUNNELLERS RIDGE, and in COBURG NO I TUNNEL, Major Brown 2nd in Command, being in charge of these two Companies which occupied the left half of the Battalion frontage. “A” and “C” Companies, forming the right half of the attack, moved out of the front line to the right where they assembled in BLUE BULL TUNNEL, Major H [P] Stanley being in charge of these two Companies for assembly. The dispositions for the attack were as follows :-
Right Half 1st Wave “A” Coy under Captain B. Simpson and Lieut D. H. Farnori.
Left Half 1st Wave “B” Coy under Captain H H Patch, and Lieuts G.H.H. Eadie and P.G. Hawkins.

VOL VIII, Page II

  • March 1st
73rd Battalion War Diary
73rd Battalion War Diary – page 2.

 

2nd Wave, “C” Coy under Lieut G. S. McLennan, Major Munroe and Lieut J. Norsworthy.

No. 1 Patrol, 1 Platoon of “D” Coy under Lieut. Griffiths.
No. 2 Patrol, 1 Platoon of “D” Coy under Lieut. Lester.
No. 3 Patrol, 1 Platoon of “B” Coy under Lieut Hutchinson.

At 2.55 a.m. messages were received from all Companies that they were in position.
At 3 am the first gas cloud, known as the “White Star Gas” was released. Within a few minutes after the release of the gas very heavy rifles and machine gun fires opened upo from the German front and support lines, and the sky was lit upo by hundreds of flares sent up by the Boche; this fire and the sending up of the flares continued for 36 minutes, showing that the gas was not effective. At about 3.06 am the Germans opened heavy Artillery fire across our whole front, which continued tunil 4.00 am at which time it died down and shortly afterwards the situation became almost normal. Soon after 4 o’clock the direction of the wind commenced to change, and by 5 am, which was the time for liberation of the 2nd Gas Wave, it was coming from almost due [North], so that it was decided

VOL VIII, Page III

  • March 1st
73rd Battalion War Diary
73rd Battalion War Diary – page 3.

 

that the gas could not be let off. The Infantry Attack was to commence at 5.40 AM. About 5.20 a message was received from Advanced Brigade Headquarters to the effect that there remained considerable gas in our front line trench for a distance extending 300 yard north of [C]RANBY C.T. This interfered with the assembly of our right attacking parties and instructions were immediately sent to Major Stanley to have “A” and “C” Companies assemble in front and behind the front line trench, and to proceed overland instead of assembling in the trench; this complicated the assembly of these two Companies very much, but the situation was admirably handled by Major Stanley. At 5.32 a.m. while the assembly across our whole front was in progress, heavy artillery fire was opened on our front and support lines and on ZOUAVE VALLEY by the Germans. It transpired that the Brigade on our right had commenced to get out over the parapet and form a line in front of our wire at 5.30 instead of waiting for our barrage which was to commence at 5.40 am; this was noticed by the Germans, who immediately sent up their “S.O.S.” with the foregoing result. This meant that the last 5 minutes of the assembly of our parties had to be completed under fire, and a number of casualties occurred before our men got out of our own trenches. On the righ casualties began to come into BLUE BULL

VOL VIII, Page IV

  • March 1st
73rd Battalion War Diary
73rd Battalion War Diary – page 4.

 

TUNNEL before much more than half of our attacking parties were out of the Tunnels. A few men were affected by gas on this front. Promptly at 5.40 AM our barrage opened up, and our attacking parties got over the parapet and went forward. On our extreme left our barrage was short, and some casualties were caused to our men by our own fire particularly among the party going out by way of Sap B6. A full account of the action of all attacking paties and the results obtained is attached hereto. Casualties soon began to come back to our lines, about 6.20 Lieut. Eadie reached Advanced Battalion Headquarters and about 6.50 Captain Patch also returned, both wounded slightly. Wounded came in steadily but it was a considerable time before it was possible to even approximately check up casualties. By 8 a.m. the situation had quieted down, except that several of our wounded accompanied by Lieut Hutchison were still out in shellholes beyond Sap B6. The artillery was called upon for a barrage on the German front line to enable these men to be got in, their fire however was short, and word was sent to have it stopped. During this fire Battalion Headquarters moved to the normal position in ZOUAVE VALEY and our own shells lit jut behind the personnel of Battalion Headquarters while moving down UHLAN C.T. It was for a time thought the Germans would counter attack, and this impression was increased by the fact that a German

VOL VIII Page V

  • March 1st
73rd-Battalion-War-Diary-5-1024x6561.jpg
73rd Battalion War Diary – page 5.

 

aeroplane made several flights along our line net over 100 yards in the air, evidently observing the number of men in our line and their movements; all precautions were taken to beat off a counter attack, and it did not develope. During the day there continued a certain amount of enemy artillery activity, which, however, did not do any particular harm. That night it was decided to keep the whole Battalion on the eastern side of ZOUAVE VALLEY in case of attack, and the men of the Support Companies were accomodated in tunnels and dugouts on the Wester slope of the Ridge. The night, however, passed quietly. Many individual cases of outstanding bravery were noted during the action, especially Sgt. Millar and Sgt Holmden. During the attack 22 prisoners were taken by this Battalion, 19 of them being taken by Sgt Hannaford and Pte McLachlan. Officers and men without exception fought magnificently. Casualties during the action were as follow :-

Lieuts H P MacGregor, J W Lester, D A Farnori and [P] G Hawkins, Missing
Lieut J W. Griffiths – Died of Wounds
Capt. B Simpson, Capt. H H Patch and Lieuts G H H Eadie and G S McLennan – Wounded
26 OR Killed, 99 OR Wounded 27 OR Missing Total Casualties 161.

As a result of the operation two Officers were recommended for the D.S.O. four Officers for the M.C.

VOL VIII Page VI

  • March 1st
73rd Battalion War Diary
73rd Battalion War Diary – page 6.

 

…four OR’s for the D.C.M. and twelve OR’s for the M.M.
Notice received from Brigade that Lieuts. H [S] MacGregor and J H Christie ahd been awarded the Military Cross for their work in connection with the previous raid.

  • March 2nd

During the night a number of parties were sent out into “NO MAN’S LAND” to bring in dead and wounded, and a number of bodies were recovered, these were all sent out and buried in VILLERS and BOIS Cemetery.
The day was fairly quiet, only the usual artillery and trench mortor activity. Large parties of men were employed carrying out empty gas cylinders, as well as those full ones which had not been let off on the 1st Mar. A great deal of work was also necessary, and was sone on those trenches which had been damaged by the enemy’s fire on the 1st. In the afternoon word was received that Hunt Griffiths had died of his wounds, and arrangements were made for representatives of the Battalion to attend his funeral on the 3rd.

  • March 3rd

The early hours of the morning passed fairly quietly, but at 3 am the enemy opened up a heavy artillery and trench mortar fire on our front and support lines, doiing considerable damage. Our artillery retaliation was both slow and ineffective. The German fire caused no casualties, one OR Killed and one OR Wounded by our own Artillery.

________________

More posts about WWI.

WWI War Stories
What We Don’t Hear About Vimy Ridge
UK National Archives treasures: WWI war diaries now online

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The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

Transcription: Parish Registry of Births and Baptisms of Lytham, Lancaster 1822.

The following is my transcription of the Parish Registry of Births and Baptisms of Lytham, Lancaster for 1822.

A true and perfect copy of the Parish Registry of Lytham in the County of Lancaster from the first day of January to the thirty first day of December 1822.

Children and parents names     place of abode     profession     When born     When baptized     By Whom

Sarah Daughter of Isaac and Betsey Teeling     Lytham     Sailor     Decr 17th 1821     Jany 13th 1822     P. J. Lister
Agnes Daughter of John and Sarah Corwen      Do     Labourer     Decr 8th 1821     Jany 13th 1822     P. J. Lister
James Son of Thos and Alice Whiteside     Lytham     Weaver     Decr 18th 1821     Jany 27th 1822     P. J. Lister
Isabelle Daughter of Thos and Betty Greenbank     Lytham     Labourer     Oct 14th 1821     Jany 10th 1822     P. J. Lister
Willm & Ellen Son & Daughter of Robt and Magdalene Fox     Lytham     Bricklayer     Jany 11th 1822     Feby 17th     P. J. Lister
Sarah Daughter of George and Sarah Pearson     Lytham     Shoemaker     Jany 25th     Feby 24th P. J. Lister
James Son of Thomas and Margaret Fox     Lytham     Joiner     Jany 30th     March 17th     P. J. Lister
Thomas Son of Richard and Mary Wilking     Lytham     Labourer     Feby 9th     March 17th     P. J. Lister
Willm Son of Robert and Ellen Knowles     Do     Sailor     Feby 13th     March 17th     P. J. Lister
Margaret Daughter of James and Betty Atkinson     Lytham     Labourer     March 14th     April 14th      Wm Barton
John Son of John and Mary Fell     Do     Sailor     Feby 25th     April 21st     P. J. Lister
Robt Son of Richd and Betty Webster     Lytham     Farmer     March 16th     April 21st     P. J. Lister
Alice Daughter of Christn and Betty Whiteside     Do     Sailor     April 6th     April 28th Wm Barton
James Son of Alice Jamison and John Kirk     Lytham     Labourer     April 14th     May 5th     P. J. Lister
Jane Daughter of James and Betty Ormond     Lytham     Husbandman     April 11th     May 19th     Wm Barton
Betty Daughter of Robert and Marjery Singleton     Do     fisherman     April 19th May 19th Wm Barton
Emmelin Daughter of Barnaby and Alice Whiteside     Lytham      Weaver     May 30th     June 23d     Wm Barton
Maryanne Daughter of James and Betty Cortmell     Do     Mariner     May 31st     June 23d     Wm Barton
Ellen Daughter of Joseph and Sarah Cortmell     Lytham     fisherman     May 24th     June 30th     Wm Barton
John Son of Willm and Ann Marshall     Do     Gentleman     May 30th     June 3d     P. J. Lister
Carolina Daughter of Jane Cookson & Wm Moorehouse     Do     Butcher     June 27th Augt 11th     P. J. Lister
Jane Daughter of Willm and Grace Wade     Lytham     fisherman     June 23d     Augt 11th     P. J. Lister
Jane Daughter of Francis and Margaret Fox     Do     Bricklayer     July 12th     Augt 11th     P. J. Lister
Peggy Daughter of Thomas and Mary Rimmer     Lytham     Sailor     Augt 18th     Sept 8th     P. J. Lister
Hannah Daughter of John and Ellen Breckall     Lytham     Weaver     Sept 14th     Sept 22d     G. L. Spencer
Cornelius Son of John and Magdalane Cordwell     Peel     Farmer     Sept 7th     Oct 6th         P. J. Lister
Thomas Son of George and Ellen Miller     Lytham Husbandman     Sept 15th     Oct 13th     Wm Barton
Sarah Daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Ditchfield     Do     Innkeeper     Sept 3d     Sept 5th     P. J. Lister
James Son of Richard and Jane Worthington     Lytham     Labourer     Oct 2d     Oct 27     P. J. Lister
Charles Frederick Clifton Son of Thomas Joseph Clifton Esqr of Lytham Hall Lancashire and Hetty his wife was born at Hatch Court in the County of Somerset     June 17th     June 25th     Samuel Fisher
Betty Daughter of Robert and Sarah Hesketh     Lytham    Labourer     Sept 19th     Nov 3d     Wm Barton
Jenny Daughter of Thos and Jane Wade     Peel        Husbandman    Sept 14th     Nov 17th     Wm Barton
Thomas Son of John and Margaret Cookson     Lytham     Husbandman     Nov 15th     Dec 15th     Wm Barton     Offitg Minister

 

 

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To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, search the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search linkand the ‘All Media‘ search link, both in the top menu.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on this site is available for free access and download.

Unravelling the mysteries behind one of Canada’s oldest cemeteries.

I had to post this article as soon as I saw it. Visiting this graveyard was one of the best family experiences we’ve ever had – and it was a great opportunity to explore our own family history.

As a matter of fact, the tour guide, Alan Melanson and I are 7th great grandchildren of Charles Mellanson and Marie Dugas (Charles was a son of the original Melanson couple – Pierre and Priscilla.)

Stuart, Erin and Alan Melanson in graveyard.
My children, Erin and Stuart, sit through an enthralling tale told by fellow ‘Melanson’ cousin, Alan Melanson, the very informative and entertaining tour guide.

It’s been a century since Fort Anne became Canada’s first administered national historic site, but much of the history surrounding the once hotly contested grounds in Annapolis Royal, N.S., is still shrouded in mystery.

On Monday, a team of researchers hope to use new technology to unlock some of the old secrets buried within Fort Anne’s Garrison Graveyard, which is one of the oldest English cemeteries in Canada.

“To understand where we’re going, we need to understand where we’ve been,” said Ted Dolan, Parks Canada’s site and visitor experience manager for historic sites in southwestern Nova Scotia.

“Any additional information that we have as to what happened on our landscape in the past is really going to inform us as to who we are and where we come from.”

Dolan describes Fort Anne as “the most fought-over piece of land in Canadian history since European colonization.” Originally fortified by the Scots as early as 1629, the site was later taken over by the French, before it fell to British troops in 1710. It would remain a regular battle scene for another 50 years.

While over 200 British headstones still stand in the Garrison Graveyard, Dolan said researchers believe there could be more than 2,000 people buried at the site whose wooden markers have since decayed over time.

In addition, prior to 1710, Dolan said French soldiers and Acadians from the region were buried at the nearby St. Jean-Baptiste parish, which had a cemetery located close to the fort.

While researchers aren’t completely sure where the French and Acadian cemetery is, he said they have a “pretty good idea. . .”

Read on . . .

Source: Unravelling the mysteries behind one of Canada’s oldest cemeteries | CTV News Atlantic

Wabanaki Collection launched to educate about Maritime Indigenous peoples | CBC News

‘We are all treaty people,’ says curator of a portal aimed at better mutual understanding.

David Perley is the ‘visionary’ First Nations education specialist and Mi’kmaq-Wolastoqey Centre director behind the inception of the Wabanaki Collection, a web portal of Indigenous educational resources. (University of New Brunswick)

The Wabanaki were New Brunswick’s first peoples, but David Perley says many students in the province are graduating from high school without knowing much about them.

“My ancestors identify themselves as Wabanaki people,” Perley said.

“In my language, that means people of the dawn.”

The Wabanaki Confederacy was around long before contact with European settlers, said Perley.

“They were dealing with other Indigenous nations, such as the Mohawks and so on. It was always discussing boundary lines, for example, or the need to have alliances against a common threat, political discussions on what they had to do in terms of internal governance and so on.”

After contact, said Perley, “It became a strong confederacy because of the need to have unity in terms of dealing with settler society.”

One of the resources in the Wabanaki Collection is an interactive map with legends about the formation of various geographical features. It was contributed by the Abbe Museum in Bar Harbor, Maine. (The Abbe Museum)

The director of the Mi’kmaq-Wolastoqey Centre at the University of New Brunswick in Fredericton said textbooks make barely a reference to Wabanaki history, let alone the culture and traditions that have been passed down for thousands of years.

The centre has launched a new online resource to try to rectify that.

It’s available to anyone looking for information about Indigenous peoples of the Maritimes.

Perley said the project was spawned by the many requests he used to get — dating back to the 1990s — from students and teachers looking for reliable reference material.

At the time, there was little to be found.

“And especially not any resource that was written by or produced by Wabanaki people — the Wolostoqiyik, the Mi’kmaq, the Passamaquoddy and the Abenakis,” Perley said during an interview with Information Morning Fredericton . . .

Read on . . .

Source: Wabanaki Collection launched to improve education about Maritime Indigenous peoples | CBC News

Transcription: The marriage of Abell Thomas and Elizabeth Humphreys.

The following is my transcription of the written record of the marriage of Abell Thomas and Elizabeth Humphreys on May 19, 1693 at Merion Monthly Meeting in Pennsylvania.

48

37   Whereas Abel Thomas of Meirion in the County of Philadelphia Bathelor and Elizabeth Humphreys of the aforesaid Township and County sign for having declared their intention of Marriage with each other before several meetings of the ???? of God called Shakers m Haveford according to good order ???? amongst them whose proceedings hereing a deliberate confedration there of consent of part as in Relations Concerned, being Clear of all others there aproved of by the sd meetings Now these are to Certify all whom it may Concern that for the full accomplishment of theirs Intentions this Nineteenth day of the third month vulgarly called May in the year according to ye English account one thousand six hundred neinty and three, They, the said Abell Thomas and Elizabeth Humphreys appeared in a solemn publick assembly of the aforesaid people ???? to go therfor that and a purpose in their publick meeting plans at meirion and in a solemn manner according to example of the Holy men of God ???????? in the scripture of ????? He ye is Abel Thomas taking the Elizabeth Humphreys by the hand, did solemnly declare as followeth viz I do heare in the presence of God and this Asembly I do take Elizabeth Humphrys to be my wife and do promise to be ??? my ???? towards her as becometh a Loving ?? in all Conditions till death separate us And then and there in sd assembly those assem??? Elizabeth Hmphreys did declare as followeth viz In the presence of God and this asembly I do take Abell Thomas to my Husband I do promise to be he?? ???? kind Loving wife till deat separate us

And the to Abell Thomas and Elizabeth Humphrys as further Confirmation thereof in then and there to those prents so? their And in witness whereof have hereunto subscribed our Names

Abell Thomas

Tho. markd

Elizabeth Thomas

The marriage of Abell Thomas and Elizabeth Humphreys on May 19, 1693.
The marriage of Abell Thomas and Elizabeth Humphreys on May 19, 1693.

Brig. Gen. Evan Shelby Jr. of Tregaron, Wales

Brig. Gen. Evan Shelby Jr. of Tregaron, Wales.

Brig. Gen. Evan Shelby Jr., born in 1725 in Tregaron, Ceredigion, Wales to Evan (Dhu) Shelby (Selby) and his wife Catherine Morgan and was baptised in St. Caron’s church. This Evan Shelby’s birth is frequently confused with that of his earlier brother Evan, who was born in 1720 and died as an infant in 1721.

Tregaron, CeredigionEvan and his family immigrated to America from Tregaron, Wales in approximately 1735, when he was about ten years of age, and settled in what was later called Antrim Township, Franklin County, Pennsylvania.

In 1739, they moved into Prince George’s (later Frederick) County, Maryland where his father died in July 1751.

Evan Jr. continued to reside in Maryland, near the North Mountain, Frederick County (now a part of Washington County) where he obtained by either deed or patent nearly 24,000 acres of land. He became interested in the Indian fur trade and was concerned in trading posts at Michilimackinac and Green Bay.

On February 26, 1745, Evan Jr. purchased property from his father, called “Maiden’s Choice” in Prince George County, Maryland.

Evan married Letitia (Leddy) Cox (Coxe) on December 4, 1745 at Kings Meadow. They had seven children: Rachel, born 1745; Susannah, born 1746; John, born 1748; Governor Isaac Shelby, born 1750; James, born 1752; Catherine, born 1755; Major Evan Shelby III, born 1757; and Moses, born 1761.

In his publication “The Birthplace and Childhood Home of Isaac Shelby in Washington County, Maryland”, 1972, Gerald J Sword describes how  Evan and Letitia Shelby lost the fight for their land (part of “Maidens Choice”) to Dr Charles Carroll. It’s not clear who aptly renamed the land to “Shelby’s Misfortune”.

Mr. Sword states:

“…The reason for Letitia to appear in court was to answer charges that she instructed their ‘Dutch servant man’ to cut down and burn the tree marking the beginning point of this land.

In June 1754, Shelby gave a recognizance of 6,000 lbs of tobacco for the appearance of his wife to answer the charges against her in the Frederick Co. Court. The case was continued from time to time until the June court of 1758:

“A suit on behalf of the Lord Proprietary vs Letitia Shelby for destroying a bound tree for a tract of land belonging to Dr Carroll, when it was ‘maked struck off after 15 continuances…”

Evan’s great skill as a hunter and woodsman led to his appointment as Captain of a company of Rangers in the French and Indian War, during which year he made several successful expeditions into the Allegheny Mountains.

He fought many battles in what is called Braddock’s War and was noted for his performance in the battle fought at Loyal Hanning, now Bedford, Pennsylvania.

During the French and Indian War, Evan participated in General Edward Braddock’s campaign in 1755 and laid out part of the road from Fort Frederick to Fort Cumberland. He led the advance of the army under General Forbes, which took possession of Fort Du Quesne in 1758.

Having served as First Lieutenant in Captain Alexander Beall’s company 1757 to 1768, he was commissioned by Governor Sharpe of Maryland as Captain of a company of rangers, and also held a commission as Captain under the government of Pennsylvania. He was in the advance party of the force under General John Forbes, which took possession of Fort Duquesne in 1758, and crossed the Ohio River with more than half his company of scouts, making a daring reconnaissance of the fort.

On November 12, 1758, near Loyalhanna, he is said to have slain with his own hand one of the principal Indian chiefs.

In the same war, he served later as Major of a detachment of the Virginia regiment.

For several years after the conflict, Evan was a Justice of the Peace.

In May 1762, he was chosen one of the Managers for Maryland of the Potomac Company. He sustained heavy losses in the Indian trade from the ravages growing out of Pontiac’s Conspiracy of 1763, and most of his property in Maryland was subjected to sale for the satisfaction of his debts.

Hoping to better his fortune he moved, probably in 1773, to Fincastle County in southwest Virginia, where he engaged in farming, merchandising, and cattle ranching. He again became a prosperous landowner and influential frontier leader.

In 1774, he commanded the Fincastle Company in Dunmore’s War, and in the battle of Point Pleasant, October 10, 1774, he succeeded near the close of the action to the chief command as a result of the death or disability of his superior officers and he utterly routed the enemy.

His son, Isaac, served under his command as his Lieutenant in the Battle of Point Pleasant, which he was instrumental in winning. Isaac commanded the fort there until July, 1775, when his troops were disbanded by Lord Dunmore.

After returning to Kentucky due to failing health, he became involved in the Battle of Long Island Flats. At the first onset of the Indians, the American lines were broken, and then Shelby, present only as a volunteer Private, seized the command, reformed the troops, and defeated the Indians, with the loss of only two badly wounded men.

This battle, and John Sevier’s defence of Watauga, frustrated the rear attack by which the British hoped to envelop and crush the southern colonies.

In 1776, he was appointed by Governor Patrick Henry of Virginia a Major in the troops commanded by Colonel William Christian against the Cherokees, and on December 21, he became Colonel of the militia of the County of Washington, of which he was also a magistrate.

In 1777, he was entrusted with the command of sundry garrisons posted on the frontier of Virginia, and in association with Preston and Christian, negotiated a treaty with the Cherokees.

When Sevier, in 1779, projected the expedition that captured the British stores at Chickamauga, Shelby equipped and supplied the troops by the pledge of his individual credit. In this year he was commissioned a Major by Governor Thomas Jefferson, but, when the state line was run, his residence was found to be in North Carolina. He then resigned his commission, but was at once appointed Colonel of Sullivan County by Caswell.

He was in Kentucky, perfecting his title to lands he had selected on his previous visit, when he heard of the fall of Charleston and the desperate situation of affairs in the southern colonies. He at once returned to engage in active service and, crossing the mountains into South Carolina in July, 1780, he won victories over the British at Thicketty Fort, Cedar Springs, and Musgrove’s Mill. But, as the disastrous defeat at Camden occurred just before the last engagement, he was obliged to retreat across the Alleghanies. There he undertook with John Sevier the remarkable expedition which resulted in the Battle of King’s Mountain and turned the tide of the revolution. For this important service he and Sevier received the thanks of the North Carolina legislature, and the vote of a sword and a pair of pistols.

As a result of the new boundary line between Virginia and North Carolina, it was discovered that his residence was in North Carolina, and in 1781, he was elected a member of its Senate. Five years later, the Carolina Assembly made him Brigadier General of the militia of the Washington District of North Carolina, the first officer of that grade on the “Western Waters”.

In March 1787, as commissioner for North Carolina, he negotiated a temporary truce with Col. John Sevier, Governor of the insurgent and short-lived “State of Franklin”.

In August 1787, he was elected Governor of the “State of Franklin” to succeed Sevier but declined. Having resigned his post as Brigadier General on October 29,1787, he withdrew from public life.

A primer on cemetery research to find ancestors.

I’ve always loved gravestone and cemetery research to find ancestors.

Although I do most of my genealogical research via the internet, and in a very small amount via snail mail, there is something visceral about visiting the actual graves of our ancestors and recording the information about them (and their families if in family plots).

In previous posts, I related the story of my family’s genealogical driving tour of Nova Scotia a few years ago. The first was about our exploring a community cemetery and the other was regarding our experience taking the Fort Anne graveyard tour.

When you’re working on researching distant generations of ancestors, cemetery research is one of the most satisfying, hands on forms of genealogical exploration you can do. It’s one way to connect with a tangible reminder of particular ancestors, which is often an elusive feeling.

Finding a tombstone or other sign of the resting place of an ancestor can give you insights into who they were.

Is their tombstone humble or grand?

Does it contain an inscription that speaks of a simple life, of one that hints at a great love story, or a somber and religious disposition?

What dates are inscribed?

The information source is rich, yet locating cemeteries and navigating the research process isn’t always straightforward. Here’s how to get started with genealogical cemetery research.

 

What can I expect to learn from a cemetery?

 

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 22 Aug 2015.

 

It’s important to note that cemeteries and grave markers can be excellent sources of information about the deceased. While they are not primary information sources, they can clarify details such as:

  • an ancestor’s name, including obscure details like maiden names and middle names or even occasionally pet names;
  • date of birth;
  • date of death;
  • names of family members including parents, spouses, and children;
  • religion;
  • military service; and
  • fraternal order membership.

Cemeteries are a wonderful source of information that can confirm what you’ve learned from earlier research. In other cases, you’ll garner information that you didn’t know.

For example, there may be symbolism on a tombstone suggesting that your ancestor was a member of the Masonic Lodge or perhaps they are buried in a Catholic burial ground. Each of these small clues can open up new avenues for research and exploration.

 

How to find out where someone is buried?

 

There are many ways to find where your ancestors are buried.

The first is to look at any records associated with their death, including certificate of death, obituaries, church notices, and other funerary documents. Consulting similar information for spouses, siblings, children, and parents can also sometimes lead you to the right information.

If you know your ancestor’s religious affiliation, it’s possible to find out if there’s a church or community cemetery. Consult local records and histories.

Finally, there are a number of cemetery guides online that can help you locate an ancestor’s gravesite.

You might also want to try billiongraves.com and findagrave.com. They can be very helpful in locating family members and their information.

 

Making the most of a cemetery visit.

 

Whether you’re already near a cemetery where an ancestor is buried or you’re making a special trip, there are several things you’ll want to do to make the most of your visit.

The first is to bring a copy of any information you have about the ancestors, such as names and dates of birth. If you have a map or details of the cemetery, bring those as well, as large burial grounds can be difficult to navigate.

To document as much information as possible, bring paper and writing implements or electronic devices to record information and make any notes.

Consider bringing a digital camera with you to document the cemetery, individual headstones, and the relationship between specific stones that may be useful later.

Avoid taking grave rubbings, if possible. It’s a source of conflict but most people today feel that the risk of damage to the stone is too high. A high resolution camera now yields a wonderful degree of detail.

A final note on the logistics of cemetery visits: dress appropriately for being outdoors, and think ahead to things like bug spray and sunscreen. Wear a hat, and bring plenty of water as your visit may be a lengthy one.

If the cemetery you’re visiting is on private property, get permission first.

If the cemetery in question has a caretaker and you’re able to find them, spend a moment saying hello and explaining your mission. They may have valuable information.

Finally, if you’re headed into a cemetery that’s overgrown, isolated, or in an unknown area, consider bringing a companion for both company and safety.

A professional genealogist can help you with all types of genealogical issues, from completing all your research to answering specific questions about cemetery research.

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Jillynn Stevens is a writer and researcher. She is the Director of Digital Content Marketing for Be Locally SEO where she enjoys helping clients expand and improve their businesses through articles, blogs, website content and more.

Transcription: Marriage Record of Thomas White and Rebeckah Harris.

The following is my transcription of the marriage record of Thomas White and Rebeckah Harris.

The marriage was performed with members of the Philadelphia monthly meeting, friends, and their families on 8da 4mo 1704.

38.

Whereas Thomas White of Philadelphia in the Province of Pennsylvania Baker & Rebeckah Harris of the same place having declared their intentions of marriage with each other before several monthly meetings of the people of God called Quakers in Philadelphia aforesaid, according to the good order used amongst them whose proceedings therein after due deliberation thereof and having consent of parties and relations concerned, they appearing clear of all other were approved of by the said meetings Now these are to certify all whom it may concern that for the full accomplishing of their said intentions this eighth day of the fourth mouth in the year One Thousand Seven Hundred and Four they the said Thomas White and Rebeckah Harris appeared in a publick & solemn assembly of the aforesaid people and others met together at their publick meeting house in Philadelphia aforesaid and in a solemn manner he the said Thomas White taking her the said Rebeckah Harris by the hand did openly declare That he took her to be his wife, promising with gods assistance to be to her a faithful & loving husband till death should separate them and then and there is the said assembly the said Rebeckah Harris did likewise declare That she took him the said Thomas White to be her husband in like manner promising to be to him a faithful and loving wife till death should separate and for a further confirmation thereof they the said Thomas White and Rebeckah Harris (she according to the Custom of Marriage) assuming the name of her husband did then & there to these presents set their hands and we whose names are here underwritten being present amongst others at the solemnization of their said Marriage & subscription in manner aforesaid As witnesses thereunto, have also to these presents subscribed our names the day and year above written.

Geo: Gray, Ralph Jackson, Antho. Morris, Wm Southby, Philip England, Caspar Hoedt, Price Peters, Wm. Forrest, Tho: Masters, Tho: Griffith, John Parsons, Robt Burron, Hugh Durbrow, Geo: Booker, John Austin, Saml Preston, James Steel, Arthur Elton, Jno. Jones, Walter Long, Thomas Iredell, Geo: Painter, Maurice Lisle, Jno. Parker, John Cadwalader —

Hanah Hill, Margt. Jones, Rachll Elton, Jone Forrest, Mary Badcock, Luce Evans, Ann Brown, Eliza. Holton, Mary Parker, Jane Doe, Sarah Hutcheson, Samuel & Hannah Carpenter, Rebeckah Williams, Mary Hardiman, Hanah Hardiman, Sam Carpenter Jnr, Deborah Hardiman

Thomas White
Rebeckah White

Marriage record of Thomas White and Rebeckah Harris.
Marriage record of Thomas White and Rebeckah Harris.

____________________

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Archaeologists find ancient ‘comics’ decorating Roman tomb in Jordan | Haaretz.com

Archaeologists in Jordan have uncovered a Roman-era tomb decorated with spectacular frescoes that include rudimentary “comics” – which were written in Aramaic using Greek letters. The drawings provide extraordinary testimony to the diverse and cosmopolitan environment in the Hellenistic border towns of the Roman empire.

Like other wondrous archaeological discoveries, the nearly 2,000-year-old burial was unearthed by chance in late 2016 during roadworks, in this case in front of a school in the Jordanian village of c, just north of Irbid.

Since then a team of local and international researchers has been studying the find, which they believe to be part of a necropolis in the ancient Greco-Roman settlement of Capitolias, reports the CNRS, France’s National Center for Scientific Research.

The 52-square-meter tomb is divided into two burial chambers and contains a large basalt sarcophagus, all in very good condition considering that there are indications the tomb has been looted in the past, says archaeologist and epigraphist Julian Aliquot.

It likely dates to the early days of the city, which was founded in the late 1st century C.E., Aliquot says, according to the CNRS report.

Read on . . .

Source: Archaeologists find ancient ‘comics’ decorating Roman tomb in Jordan – Archaeology – Haaretz.com

Transcription: Sarah Biddle (Shreve), Last Will and Testament of 31 Aug 1807.

388

[. . .]

Sarah Biddle’s Will.

Be it remembered that I, Sarah Biddle of the township of Springfield, in the County of Burlington, and State of New Jersey, widow, being in a weak state of body, but, through Divine favour, of sound mind and memory do make and publish this for my last will and testament, hereby revoking all others – First to my dear and affectionate daughter, Beulah Sansom, I give and bequeath all my wearing apparel – I also give to my said daughter the use of my household goods during the term of her natural life, and at her decease the same to my nephew James Shreve his heirs and assigns – Second, I bequeath to my executors and the survivor of them, her or his executors and administrators, two thousand pounds, Intrust nevertheless to loan out the same, at interest in this State on good and sufficient land security at their discretion and to pay the interest thereof coming due, annually to my aforesaid daughter during her life, and at her decease, if she leaves issue, I give to such issue the said principal sum of two thousand pounds, to be paid to him, her or them, as the case may be, together with whatever interest shall have arisen thereon after the decease of my said daughter; when he she or they shall arrive to lawful age; but in case there shall not be ssue of my said duaghter living to lawful age as above siad to receive the same I dispose of it in the following manner – To my two nephews Alexander Shreve and Charles Shreve, and to my four nieces Theodocia Earl, Leah Burr, Sarah Hulme and Rebecca Hulme, I give and bequeath

Sarah Biddle (Shreve): Her Last Will and Testament. Pg 387.
Sarah Biddle (Shreve): Her Last Will and Testament

388

eighteen hundred pounds, that is three hundred pounds to each of them and to my nephew James Shreve, I give two hundred pounds, which alltogether covers the said two thousand pounds, and should there be interest that has arisen thereon after the decease of my said daughter and before a division of the principal may take place, my will is that such interest shall be divided in the same proportions as is directed for the principal – Third, all the residue of my estate which I estimate at about three thousand pounds, after payment of my debts and funeral expenses I give and devise to my aforesaid nephew James Shreve on the following conditions: – during the lifetime of my aforesaid daughter, he my said nephew is to pay to her annually six per cent interest on the appraised value thereof, and at her decease to pay to his brother Alexander Shreve, one hundred pounds – to Sarah Biddle Hulme, the daughter of his sister Sarah Hulme, one hundred pounds, and in case the last named legatee shall not have arisen to the age of eighteen years at the decease of my said duaghter, I direct that her legacy be paid into the hands of her mother who is to have the use and profit of the same during her said child’s minority, at the end whereof her said child is to receive the said one hundred pounds to her own use – And to such person or perso s as the monthly meeting of friends held at Upper Springfield in the County of Burlington shall by a minute of said meeting certified by their Clerk authorize to receive the same on their behalf, the sum of fifty pounds; The said meeting to hold it in trust and to distribute the same at their discretion or at the discretion of a committee occasionally appointed thereby for the purpose in sums not exceeding five pounds to one individual amongst the aged or infirm members of said meeting who are not chargable to the said monthly meeting for a maintenance – Fourth In case that any or either of the legatees in perpetuity herein named should die befoer me, the legacy or legacies of such is not to lapse, but to descend to his, her or their heirs in the same way as it would have descended had such legatee been in possession thereof and died intestate – Lastly, I appoint my aforesaid dughter Beulah Sansom, executrix, and my aforesaid nephew James Shreve, executor of this my testament and last will – In witness whereof  have hereto set my hand and seal this thirty first day of the eighth month in the year one thousand eight hundred & seven.

Sarah Biddle {SEAL}

Signed, sealed, published and declared by the said Sarah Biddle to be her testament and last will in the presence of us XXXX The word “Sarah”

Sarah Biddle (Shreve): Her Last Will and Testament
Sarah Biddle (Shreve): Her Last Will and Testament Pg 388.

____________________

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It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on this site is available for free access and download.

Transcription: 70 signers of the Founding of Arichat Parish, Cape Breton.

 

Following is the transcription of the short biographies of the 70 signers of the founding of Arichat Parish, Cape Breton, as originally translated by Lena Samson in 2006.

 

The 70 signers of the Founding of Arichat Parish, Cape Breton CO 217, vol 104, pp 409-410. RAC of 1905, app A, 3rd part, app J, p 308

“His Majesty’s faithfull Acadian subjects, Inhabiting the Isle of Madame” dated March 8, 1786, 70 heads of families, the founders of Arichat parish, thanked the lieutenant governor of Cape Breton, J.F.W. DesBarres, for the promise of land concessions, the permission to construct a church and school, and the request for tax exemptions. Stephen A. White, genealogist from the Centre d’Études Acadiennes at the Universite de Moncton, identified these 70 settlers in his Cahiers de la société historique acadienne, vol. XXIII, Jan. 1992, p. 4-26; titled “Les fondateurs de la paroisse d’Arichat, Cap-Breton”.

Translated by Lena Samson 2006

 

1/R Terrieaux

René Thériot, son of Joseph Theriot and Marguerite Melanson, born at Riviere aux Canards, the 4 Dec. 1721, baptized at Grand Pré, the 14 th of the same month, married at Grand Pré, 23 nov 1744, to Anne LeBlanc, daughter of notary René LeBlancand Marguerite Thébeau. Taking refuge at Nipisiguit, in the Bay de Chaleurs in 1761, René and Anne were taken prisoners and taken to Fort Cumberland and then to Halifax. Arriving in Arichat just after the Paris Treaty, René made friends with Charles Robin, according to Charles journal (photocopy CEA 521. 1-1: see page 1769-1) He died between 1806, when he changed his will, and 1810, the date of the register of this document in the county of Cape Breton.René is the ancestor of all the Theriaults of Isle Madame.

2/S Forrest

Simon Forrest, son of Pierre Forrest and Madeleine Babin, born at Pisiquit, about 1724, married about 1749 to Marguerite Gautrot, daughter of Jean Gautrot and Anne LeBlanc. Transported to Massachusetts in 1755, Simon and Marguerite stayed a few years at Weymouth, town of this colony. Retuned to Acadia in 1763-64, they settled at Arichat. According to Abbe J B A Ferland (Journal of a voyage on the shores of Gaspesie, 1836, page 416), Simon Forest died 1819, at the age of 95 years. He is the ancestor of the Forests of Isle Madame, Iles de la Madeleine and Gaspesie.

3/P Bauséjour

(B Beausejour) Paul Godin dit Bellefontaine dit Beausejour, son of Joseph Godin dit Beausejour and Marie-Anne Bergeron, born at Riviere St Jean, married about to Madeleine Dugas, daughter of Joseph Dugas and Marguerite Coste, and widow of Charles Fougere. Their marriage was revalidated at Arichat on 12 August 1771, by Abbe C F Bailly. A prisoner at Halifax in 1763, Paul Beausejour came to Isle Madame soon after, where he married Charles Fougere’s widow. According to Placide Gaudet (Genealogies Acadiennes, manuscript at CEA, pp2020-1 and 2), the descendants of his son, Michel, took the name of Bellefontaine, while his son, Paul, kept the name of Beausejour. Boniface Fougere, born of the first marriage of Madeleine Dugas, is “the old Fougere” of whom Edme Rameau de Saint Pere speaks (Cahiers de la SHA, vol 4, #5, April-June 1972, pp207-209).

4/C Boudrot

Madoise C Budro of L’Ardoise Charles Boudreau) Charles Boudrot dit Madouesse, son of Michel Boudrot and Anne Landry, born at Port Toulouse about 1725, married there about 1754 to Marguerite Dugas, daughter of Abraham Dugas and Marguerite Fougere. Charles and Marguerite seem to have escaped the evacuation of Ile Royale in 1758, by hiding in the woods. In 1771, they were living in D’Escousse, where Abbe Bailly baptized 6 of their children. It seems they settled at Grand Digue (now Poulamon), in the same parish, because that is where their descendants were more numerous in the 19th century.

5/M Porryere

M Poirier Michel Poirier, son of Joseph Poirier and Jeanne Arseneau, possibly born at Beaubassin, married about 1756 to Judith Richard, daughter of Alexander Richard and Marie-Madeleine Thibodeau. According to an old story preserved by Placide Gaudet (CEA, 1.22-21) Michel and Judith were in the Fortress of Louisbourg, during the last siege; where their daughter Anastasie was born, in a casemate, and was always known, as a consequence, as Anastasie Casemate. In 1760, they were at Restigouche, and the following year at Nipisiguit. Taken as prisoners to Halifax, they were released in 1763. L’Abbe Bailly baptized 3 of their children in Arichat in 1771. The Poirier line is still strong in West Arichat.

6/A Belfontine

Anselme Bellefontaine Anselm Godin dit Bellefontaine, son of Charles Godin dit Boisjoli and Marie Melanson, was born at Riviere St Jean about 1738, married about 1766 to Marguerite Theriot, daughter of Rene Theriot (#1, above) and Anne LeBlanc. Anselm’s parents were prisoners at Halifax in 1763, Anselm, too, must have been among their 8 children who were also there. From Charles
Robin’s journal, we learn that Anselm worked with his father-in-law, building boats. He was alive in 1821, when he sold his land to Hippolyte Marmaud, future husband of his granddaughter, Marie Barbe LeBlanc. His only son, Marc Bellefontaine, settled at Grand Digue in New Brunswick, in June 1821. At Arichat, the name of Bellefontaine was continued by Michel Beausejour, whose father (#3) was Anselm’s first cousin.

7/R LaBlanc

R LeBlanc Rene LeBlanc, son of the notary René LeBlanc and Marguerite Thebeau, born at Grand Pre 10 nov 1731, married at Grand Pre in 1752 to Anne Blanchard, daughter of Rene Blanchard and Marguerite Theriot.Refugees at Bat de Chaleurs, with their brother-in-law, Rene Theriot (#1) Rene and Anne came to Arichat the same way, that is, by Fort Cumberland and Halifax. In 1790, Rene LeBlanc, with his sons, Mathurin and Hyacinthe, his son-in-law, Michel Boudrot and his nephews Joseph and Simon Theriot, obtained a big lot of land at Caribacou (now Port Malcolm), on Cape Breton Island, where they dreamed of founding a new settlement, but the place was not suitable, and they returned to Isle Madame.Rene. He was successful at selling this lot of land on 30 Jan 1811, but he is not on the census of the 29 march of the same year. He is the ancestor of the LeBlancs of West Arichat, Petit de Grat , River Bourgeois, etc.

8/J Forgeron

Joseph Sauvage dit Forgeron, son of Pierre Sauvage dit Forgeron and Marie Jeanne Pinet, was born at Port Toulouse about 1752, married (1) about 1773, Theotiste Fougere, daughter of Joseph Fougere (#54) and Marguerite Coste, and (2) bef 1808, Osite, probably, Osite Henry (#47) and Marie Carret. The Forgeron families were not among the evacuees from Isle Royale after the fall of Louisbourg, but their whereabouts between 1758 and 1771, When L’Abbe Bailly met them in Arichat, is unknown. Joseph and his brothers Jean and Paul, and brother-in-law Michel Boutin (#46), settled at Little Arichat,(now West Arichat), on land they were granted in 1790. Navigator, he died after 4 oct 1819, the date he sold his land at Little Arichat. Joseph Forgeron’s 3 daughters have left numerous descendants.

9/P Forgeron

Paul Sauvage dit Forgeron, brother of (8), was born about 1759, married (1) about 1784, Henriette Boudrot, daughter of Joseph Boudrot and Judith Fougere, and (2) about 1810, Apollonie Boucher, daughter of Honore Boucher and Marie Anne Marres dit La Sonde, and widow of Joseph Fougere. Through their only son, Pierre, Paul and Henriette had many descendants at West Arichat, but at this moment, this line only exists in the United States.

10/J Forgeron

Jean Sauvage dit Forgeron, brother to (8 and 9), born at Port Toulouse about 1754, married (1) a woman not known yet, and (2) abt 1792, Genevieve-Sophie Daigre, daughter of Gregoire Daigre and Marguerite Josephe Henry. He died after 27 March 1821, when he signed away his land in Little Arichat. Jean and Sophie Forgeron’s descendants still reside on Isle Madame.

(I did not know the word hypotheque, and translated it to “signed away”)

11/J Forrest

Jean Forest, son of Simon Forest (#2), and Marguerite Gautrot, was born at Pisiquit, about Sept 1750, married about 1773 to Modeste Fougere, daughter of Joseph Fougere (#54), and Marguerite Coste. Deported to Massachusetts with his parents, he returned with them to Acadia, and became a builder and long-range captain. He probably lost his life, in the sinking of his Schooner “Mary” in 1801. (J P Parker,Cape Breton Ships and Men, 1967, p 98) The descendants of his only son, Jean, lived in Arichat until about 1900.

12/A Landri

A Landry Alexandre Landry, son of Joseph Landry and Marie-Marguerite Breau, baptised at Port Toulouse, about 1754, married around 1775, Madeleine Marchand, daughter of Jean Marchand and Genevieve Pouget. He possibly was born at River Inhabitants, where his parents were in the census of 1752. He He was at Miquelon, with his father, a widower, in 1767. Deported from the islands later, in 1767, Alexandre resided with his father and sisters at L’Ardoise, from where he moved to Petit de Grat before 1788. Many of the Landry name claim him as their ancestor.

13/ S Forrest

Jun S Forest, Junr Simeon or Simon Forest, son of Simon Forest (#2) and Marguerite Gautrot, born at Weymouth, Massachusetts, 20 Feb 1757, married about 1780, to Cecile Boudrot, daughter of Louis Boudrot and Barbe Fougere. Returning to Acadia with his parents, Simeon was baptised, at the age of 14, by L’Abbe Bailly, on 28 July 1771. Having learned English, while living in exile, Simeon helped his neighbours and friends, especially as their spokesperson with the government, according to a letter, sent by his great grandson, Bernard Pate, to Placide Gaudet (CEA 1. 66-18) He died before 7 April 1809, when his widow, sold his share of the Forestland grant to his brother, Paul. His widow became tavern keeper at Arichat.

14/ C Porryere omitted

Charles Poirier, son of Charles Poirier (#30) and Marguerite Vigneau, born at Port Toulouse in 1750, married (1) about 1780, Rose McDonald, daughter of Thomas McDonald and Marie Hill, and (2), to Dorothee Petitpas. Charles and Rose had a large family in D’Escousse, where part of the parish bears the name Poirierville, in their honour.

15/Jos. Terrieaux omitted

Joseph Theriot, son of Rene Theriot (#1) and Anne LeBlanc, married at Arichat 4 Nov 1771, Anne Boudrot, daughter Michel Boudrot and Anne Fougere. He helped his maternal uncle, Rene LeBlanc, (#7) with the building of a colony at Carabacou, but soon returned to Arichat.According to a letter sent by L’Abbe Francois Lejamtel, to the Bishop of Quebec, dated 2 June 1803, Joseph possibly drowned on his return trip from Halifax in 1798. His descendants lived mostly in Arichat and Petit de Grat until the end of the 19th century.

16/S Terrieaux

S Terrieaux Simon Theriot, brother to (#15) born at Remshig, about nov 1749, and baptized at Port LaJoie on 10 Aug 1750, married about 1775 to Marguerite Bodrot, daughter of Louis Boudrot and Barbe Fougere. He was involved with the colony of Caribacou, but settled at Grand Ruisseau, (now Port Royal, Isle Madame), following his return to Isle Madame. He died between 28 April 1820 and 12 April 1922, according to papers concerning the sale of land. Simon is the ancestor of the Theriault line in West Arichat.

17/A Minuet

A Muniel (Morel) (Maure) Antoine Meunier, born about 1731 in France, married about 1768, Marie Josephe (Josette) Sauvage dit Forgeron, daughter of Pierre Sauvage dit Forgeron and Marie Jeanne Pinet. L’Abbe Bailly revalidated the Marriage of Antoine and Marie Josephe at Arichat, 12 Aug 1771. In 1808, his brothers-in-law sold Antoine their share of the land grant in Little Arichat (West Arichat), where the Meuniers are still of great number. We learned that Antoine was native of France, thru the Militia List for Cape Breton of 1813, where he is listed as being 82 years old.

18/ V Terrieaux

V Terrieux (Terriot) Victor Theriot, son of Rene Theriot (#1) and Anne LeBlanc, born about 1760, married (1) about 1783, Elisabeth Boudrot, daughter of Joseph Boudrot and Judith Fougere, and (2) about 1796, Ursula Fougere, daughter of Louis Fougere and Charlotte Sauvage dit Forgeron. Victor was the only heir on his father’s will. He was a captain in the Militia in 1813. He settled west of Arichat church, where his descendants Lived until the Emmigrations , at the end of the 19th century.

19/M Forrest

Forrest (Forest) Maximien Forrest, son of Simon Forest (#2) and Marguerite Gautrot, born at Weymouth, Massachusetts, 25 feb 1759, married (1) about 1780, Scholastique LeBlanc, daughter of Rene LeBlanc and Anne Blanchard, and (2) about 1805, Angelique LeBlanc, daughter of Joseph LeBlanc and Francoise Dugas,and widow of Piere Bernard Loubert. When he returned to Acadia with his parents, Maximien was baptised 28 july 1771, by L’Abbe Bailly in Arichat.He was a wholesaler, owner and captain of several schooners, Maximien passed away 28 feb 1840 in Arichat, Through his son, Charles, Maximien is the ancestor of all the Forest of Bonaventure, Quebec.

20/C Martell

C Martel Jean Charles Martel, son of Jean Baptiste Martel and Marie Josephe Pouget, born at Port Toulouse around 1734, Married, (1) about 1754 Marie-Madeleine Bois, daughter of Pierre Bois and Marie Coste, and (2) about 1769, Anne Landry, daughter of Joseph Landry and Marie-Matguerite Breau. This 2nd marriage was revalidated 3 oct 1771, in L’Ardoise. Most of the Martels of L’Ardoise can claim Charles as their ancestor. He was the paternal grandfather to Honore Martel (1806-1877), who was the first Acadien Member of the Legislative Assembley, for Cape Breton, in Nova Scotia.

21/C B Miciss

C B Micip (Mius) Charles Boudrot dit Mississe, son of Joseph Boudreau and Marguerite Dugas, born at Port Toulouse about 1738, married about 1766 to Barbe Bonin, daughter of Francois Bonin and Madeleine Fougere. L’Abbe Bailly revalidated their marriage, 25 oct 1771 at L’Ardoise. Afterwards, Charles and Barbe settled at Petit de Grat, where the majority of Boudreaus are his descendants.

22/ J Martell

J Martel Joseph Martel, son of Jean Baptiste Martel and Marie-Josephe Pouget, born about 1736 at Port Toulouse, married there about 1755, Jeanne (Jeanette) Samson, daughter of Michel Samson and Jeanne Testard. Taken away by boat to France, along with his father and mother in law in 1758, Joseph decided to return to Acadia with with them in 1764. Unfortunately, the boat, the “Neptune” sank, outside of Newfoundland, and his his wife’s parents, her brothers, Fabien and Louis, his sisters in law, Judith and Marie-Josephe, along with his own children, Madeleine and Louis, all perished. Having finally returned to Cape Breton in 1767, Joseph and Jeanette settled at L’Ardoise, and later at Rocky Bay, on Isle Madame. Joseph is ancestor to the Martells of Pondville.

23/S Brussare

S Brussare (Broussard) Simon Broussard, fils de Charles Broussard and Madeleine LeBlanc was born at Grand Pre, married about 1774 to Jeanne Boudrot, daughter of Michel Boudrot and Jeanne Fougere..Being orphaned, Simon came to Isle Mademe with his uncles, Rene LeBlanc (#7) and Rene Theriot (#1).Because we can only find one daughter, Francoise, spouse of Alexandre LeBlanc, we are of the opinion that Simon died at a young age.

24/A Landri

A Landry Alexis Landry, son of Jean Baptiste Landry and Marguerite Gautrot, was born about 1723 at Pisiguit, and married about 1748 to Marguerite Aucoin, daughter of Antoine Aucoin and Anne Breau. Alexis and Marguerite resided at River Inhabitants from 1750 on. It does not seem as if the family was deported, but in 1762, Alexis was listed on the list of refugees of Saint Suliac, in Bretagne, along with his brother-in-law, Antone Aucoin. Alexis and Marguerite were in Arichat on 26 july 1771, when L’Abbe Bailly baptised their son Jean Baptiste. The many descendants of Alexis, in order to distinguish themselves from the other Landrys, use Alexis as their last name, instead of Landry.

25/J Budro

J Budro (Boudrot) (Boudreau) Joseph Boudrot, son of Michel Boudrot and Jeanne Fougere, born at Port Toulouse, about nov 1751, married about 1774, Marguerite LeBlanc, daughter of Alexandre LeBlanc (#37) and Marguerite Boudrot. This family settled at Grand Dogue (Poulamon), where Joseph was a seaman in 1811, and a fisherman in 1813.

26/J Dugau

J Dugas (Joseph) Joseph Dugas, son of Claude Dugas and Marie Madeleine Belliveau, born at Port Toulouse, 1751, married at Arichat, 4 nov 1771, Anne Theriot, daughter of Rene Theriot (#1) and Anne LeBlanc. Joseph and Anne made their home on Isle Madame. He died shortly before 20 july 1805 (?), when his Father-in-law, Rene Theriot, replaced him, as executor of his will.

27/E Marchand

E Marchand (Eustache) Eustache Marchand, son of Jean Marchand and Genevieve Pouget, born at Port Toulouse about 1750, married about 1775, Charlotte Boudrot, daughter of Joseph Boudrot and Joseph Fougere. Eustache belonged to another family who evaded the British soldiers after the fall of Louisbourg.The Marchands were at L’ Ardoise, when L’Abbe Bailly visited that village in 1771, but it seems that he he settled in Upper Arichat, near Rocky Bay, soon after his marriage, where he was listed on the census of 1811 and 1813, as seaman and fisherman.

28/L Marchand

L Marchand (Louis) Louis Marchand, Brother to Eustache (#27) , was born in 1751, married about 1775 Theothiste Dugas, daughter of Claude Dugas and Marie Madeleine Belliveau. He settled in Upper Arichat, near Rocky Bay, by his brother Eustache. He died between 1793 and 1802. In 1811, his widow was listed alone on the census, living close to her only son, Joseph Marchand.

29/P Budro

P Budro (Boudreau) Prospere Boudrot, son of Louis Boudrot and Barbe Fougere, marrie, probably near the date of this list, to Esther LeBlanc, daughter of Rene LeBlanc (#7) and Anne Blanchard. Prospere and Esther settled at Grand Ruisseau (Port Royal), where he was fisheman and owner of a boat in 1811 and 1813.

30/C Porryere, Sen

C Porryere Senr (Poirier) Charles Poirier, son of Louis Poirier and Cecile Mognot, born at Beaubassin about 1721, married (1) at Beeaubassin, 8 feb 1746, to Marguerite Chiasson, daughter of Jean Baptiste Chiasson and Madeleine Boudrot, and (2) 15 nov 1747, at Beaubassin , to Marguerite Vigneau, daughter of Maurice Vigneau and Marguerite Comeau. Charles and his second wife, Marguerite settled at Port Toulouse after the Treaty of Aix la Chapelle. According to legend of Edme Rameaux de Saint Pere, Charles and his family hid in the woods, on an island in the Bras D’Or Lake, in 1758, where “all the dogs were killed, to prevent them from making noise”. (Cahiers de la SHA, vol 4, #5, april-june 1972, p 166) ten years or so later, Charles settled at Arichat, where he lived on land that was later expropriated to build the Court House, according to an appeal from his daughter, Eulalie. He is ancestor to the Poiriers of D’Escousse and The “Andriens” of Cheticamp.

31/F LaBlanc

F LaBlanc Francois LeBlanc, son of Francois LeBlanc and Anne Benoit, born at Cobeguit before 1735, married about 1767 Isabelle LeBlanc, daughter of Claude LeBlanc and Judith Benoit. Their marriage was revalidated by L’Abbe Bailly 12 aug 1771. Of their four children, two stayed on Isle Madame and the two others settled at Cheticamp and Margaree. Francois and Isabelle both died between 1806 and 18?

32/Jean A Landri

Jean A Landrie Jean Landry dit Alexis, fils d’Alexis Landry,(#24) et Marguerite Aucoin, born at Pisiguit about 1749, He Married about 1773, Anne Pitre, daughter of Joseph Pitre and Anne Bourg. Like many others, Jean and Anne left Isle Madame during the American War of Independence, and found refuge at Chezzetcook. Towards the end of 1790, they settled at Fortune Bay, on Ile St Jean (Prince Edward Island). They returned to Arichat before the census of 1811. Jean Landry seems to have died between 1811 and 1813.

33/Jos A Landri

Josh A Landrie (Jose) Joseph Landry dit Alexis, brother to Jean (#32) born at Pisiguit about 175? Married about 1777 to Adelaide —–. We believe that she was daughter of Pierre Bois and Jeanne Dugas, but have not ben able to prove it. Joseph and Adelaide settled at Arichat, where the 1811 census describes him as a yeoman. Their descendants are found at Isle Madame and Grand Digue, NB.

34/H Forrest

H Forrest (Forest) Pierre Hilarion Forest, son of Simon Forest (#2) and Marguerite Gautrot, was born at Pisiguit about dec 1752. He married, about 1776, Marguerite Boudrot, daughter of Charles Boudrot (#4) and Marguerite Dugas, Hilarion and Marguerite settled on the Forest land grant in Arichat. Hilarion is stated as a yeoman on the 1811 census of Cape Breton, and as a carpenter in 1813.

35/F Forrest

F Forrest (Forest) Firmin Forest, brother to (#34), born at Pisiguit about 1754m married (1) Marguerite Poirier, about 1778, daughter of Michel Poirier (#5) and Judith Richard, and (2) about 1785, Marie Martha Martel, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Martel and Anne Bourel. Firmin settled in Arichat, where he made a living with carpentry and fishing. He died between 1813 and 1816. His son, Francois Xavier, is the ancestor of the Forest at Iles de la Madeleine.

36/J C Hilbert

J C Hilbert (Hebert) Jean Hébert, son of Francois Hebert and Anne Marie Poirier, born at Beaubassin, 29 March 1741, married at Miquelom. 30 june 1766, Madeleine Bourg, daughter of Michel Bourg and Anne Boudrot, and it is believed, married again about 1795 at Arichat, Jeanne Francoise Dugas, daughter of Joseph Dugas and Marguerite LeBlanc., widow of Joseph Babin. Jean Hebert settled at the head of Arichat Harbour on a land grant, that included his sons, Joseph and Robert, his sons-in-law, Renaud Vigneau and Francois Maillet, also Simon and Joseph Babin, Jean and Pierre Boudrot. Given the fact that the last four were the sons and sons in law of Francoise Dugas, we believe that this family and Jean Hebert’s family were somehow related. By, this, we assumed that Jean Hebert had married, in a second marriage, Francoise Dugas.

37/A LaBlanc

A LaBlanc (LeBlanc) Alexandre LeBlanc, son of Joseph dit le Maigre LeBlanc and Anne Bourg, born at Grand Pré, 1 july 1732, Married at Port Toulouse, about 1754, to Marguerite Boudrot, daughter of Joseph Boudrot and Marguerite Dugas. Following the fall of Louisbourg, Alexandre and Marguerite found refuge in the Bay de Chaleurs, where he was captain in the Acadian militia. Taken prisoners in 1761, Alexander, Marguerite and their children were taken to Fort Cumberland, then Halifax. After the Paris Treaty in 1763, they arrived at Miquelon, where they stayed until 1774. Then, they definitely settled on the North side of Isle Madame.

38/P Porryere (Poirier)

Pierre Poirier, son of Charles Poirier (#30) and Marguerite Vigneau, born about 1760, married, most likely Close to the date of this document, to Nathalie dite Anasthasie Bonin, daughter of Jean Francois Bonin and Marguerite Josse. Pierre and Anasthasie homesteaded in that part of the parish of D’Escousse, known as Poirierville.Pierre died about 1806, according to a petition by Anasthasie, dated 1808, where she described herself as a widow of two years, taking care of her family of ten children.

39/G LaVache

G LaVache Firmin-Gregoire LaVache, son of Honore LaVache and Madeleine Daigre, born L’Anse aux Matelots (Sailor’s Cove, on 11 march 1753,and baptised at Port Lajoie, 12 april the following year.He married about 1778, Jeanne Dugas, daughter of Claude Dugas and Marie Madeleine Belliveau. Gregoire LaVache was transported in 1758 from Ile St Jean to Boulogne sur Mer, where most of his family died. He returned to Acadia with the Robins in 1774. Settling in Arichat, he made a living by fishing and sailing. He died between 1822 and 1830. Gregoire is the ancestor of all who bear the name of LaVache, but of this date, the name exists only in the United States.

40/J DeVoe

J DeVoe Josep DeVeau, son of Charlemagne dit Charles DeVeau (#70) and Anne Doucet [sic: should be Marie Gaudet [SAW]], born at Tantamarre about 1749, married (#1) about 1772, to Scholastique Landry, daughter of Jean Baptiste Landry (#43) and marie Josephe LeBlanc, and (2) , in 1794, to an unidentified woman. Joseph Deveau settled at Grand Digue (Poulamond), where he still lived during the Cape Breton Militia census of 1813. He was a fisherman. As well as the Deveaus of Richmond County, the Deveaus of Little Bras D’Or are his descendants.

41/P Burk

P Burk (Bourque) Pierre Bourg, son of Michel Bourg and Anne Boudrot, born St Pierre, Ile St Jean, 1 december 1740. He married about 1772, Cecile Dugas, daughter of Abraham Dugas and Marguerite Fougere. He was living in River Bourgeois at the time of the Cape Breton Militia census of 1813.By this, we presume that he, and not his brother, Joseph, who is the ancestor of the Bourgs of River Bourgeois. He made his living by fishing.

42/J Burk

J Burk (Bourque) Joseph Bourg, brother to the preceding person, was born at Port Toulouse about 1727. We could find no evidence that he was married; it could be that he was head of a family comprised of his mother, and (or) his sister Anne, who were registered in the 1767 census with him at Miquelon, also a brother Michel.His parents were originally from Port Royale, settled at Port Toulouse between 1720 and 1722, but shortly after Joseph’s birth, they moved to Tracadie, Ile St Jean. When she was left a widow, Anne Boudrot, found refuge at Nipisiguit, until taken prisoner by the English in 1761. She and her children were prisoners at Fort Cumberland, from where she reached Miquelon.

43/J La Bay Landrie

J La Bay Landrie Jean Baptiste dit L’Abbé Landry, son of Jean-Baptiste Landry and Marguerite Gautrot, was born at Grand Pré, 28 august 1712. He married, at Grand Pré, 29 October 1737, Marie-Josephe LeBlanc, daughter of Francois LeBlanc and Jeanne Hébert. These families sheltered at River Inhabitants, and were not transported ifrom Ile Royale. In 1771, Jean Baptiste and Marie-Josephe were in Arichat, where two of their children were baptised by Abbé Bailly.

44/B Girraware

B Girraware (Baptiste) (Girouard) Jean-Baptiste Girouard, son of Pierre Girouard and Cecile Detcheverry, born at Petit de Grat, about 1754, was married about 1778 to Gertrude Landry, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Landry (#43) and Marie-Josephe LeBlanc.Jean Baptiste and Gertrude settled on the West Arichat Island, long known by the Acadians of the area, as Girouard Island. He was a sailor. He died after 14 july 1832, when he made a will in favor of his daughter Gertrude’s children. He still has many descendants in West Arichat.

45/J Fougere

J Forugere (Fougere) Jean Fougere, son of Jean Fougere and Marie-Madeleine Belliveau, was born at Port Toulouse about 1742. He married, about 1767, Marguerite Landry, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Landry (#43) and Marie-Josephe LeBlanc. Jean and Marie revalidated their marriage 25 october 1771 at Petit de Grat, where two of their children were baptised. His children were mostly girls. His only son, Joseph Hilarion, nevertheless, is the ancestor of many of the names Fougere on Isle Madame, and the ggggrandfather of Mgr Joseph-Vernon Fougere, bishop of Charlottetown.

46/M Budaine

M Budaine (Babin or Boutin) Michel Boutin, son of Joseph Boutin and Francoise Pitre, was born at Spanish Bay (Sydney) 6 april 1751, baptised at Louisbourg the following 11 october. He married about 1780, Charlotte Sauvage dit Forgeron, daughter of Pierre Sauvage dit Forgeron and Marie Jeanne Pinet, widow of Louis Fougere. Separated from his parents , he was alone in Nipisiguit in 1761. We do not know how he came to Isle Madame, but he is mentioned in 1771, when he was godfather to Genevieve Bois. He settled in West Arichat, with his brothers-in-law, Joseph, Jean and Pierre Forgeron. He was one of the first churchwardens of the parish of Arichat in 1803. The children of Michel and Charlotte, were renowned for their long lives, five out of the six of them lived to between 85 and 100 years. All the Boutins of Isle Madame are their descendants.

47/J Anrie

J Anrie (Henry) Jean Henry, son of Jean Henry and Marie Hébert, was born about 1719 at Cobeguit. He married 30 april 1742 at Beaubassin, Marie Carret, daughter of Pierre Carret and Angelique Chiasson. Jean and marie left Cobeguit, to find refuge at West River, Ile ST Jean in 1750. They were transported to Saint Malo, during the winter of 1758-1759. Jean Henry left his family at Saint Servan, and went to Malouines Islands about 1767. Jean, Marie and their daughters Marguerite-Josephe, Marie and Osite, returned to Acadia in 1774.

48/G Charpantier

G Charpentier Georges Charpentier, son of Charles Charpentier and Marie-Josephe dit la Garenne Chesnay, was born april 1729, at Saint Pierre du Nord, Ile St Jean. Il marie (1) a St Servan, 27 janvier 17–, Anne Cyr, daughter of jean jacques Cyr and Marie Josephe Hébert, and (2) at Arichat, about 1779, Marguerite-Josephe Henry, daughter of Jean Henry (#47) and Marie Carret, widow of Gregoire Daigre. Deported from Ile St Jean to Bretagne in the winter of 1758-1759, Georges found himself in a very different world than the one he knew. Uniting his fate with Anne Cyr, he devoted himself to the colonisation of the Malouine Islands (Falkland Islands) with his in laws.Returning to France after 4 or 5 years, the Charpentier family had trouble in mixing into city life. In 1774, Georges had the opportunity to return to Acadia, and took it, motivated by intent to rejoin his maternal uncle, Mathieu Samson. After 6 years on Isle Madame, Georges and his second wife, Marguerite-Josephe moved to Bonaventure, where their marriage was revalidated 8 november 1780.Bup Gaspesie was not to their satisfaction, and, around 1784, they returned to Isle Madame, and later, to Havre Boucher. In the 1800’s, their descendants lived in Antigonish County and Rollo Bay, Prince Edward Island.

49/L Bennois

L Benois (Benoit) Michel dit Lazare Benoit, son of Guillaume Benoit and Marie-Josephe Gautrot, was born around 1732 at Pisiguit; married about 1755 at Port Toulouse, Marguerite Landry, daughter of Joseph Landry and Elizabeth Vincent. Lazare and Marguerite escaped the deportation, and very little is known about them. They had 2 of their children baptised at Arichat, in 1771.Then, we find the family at Havre Boucher, where Lazare is listed on the taxpayers list of 1794.

50/C LaBlanc

C LaBlanc (LeBlanc) Charles LeBlanc, son of Francois LeBlanc and Anne Michel, was born 175-. He married 7 november 1780, at Bonaventure, PQ, daughter of Gregoire Daigre and Marguerite Josephe Henry. Deported with his mother in 1758, from Ile St Jean to Cherbourg, Charles lived at St Servan, where he became a sailor. He returned to Acadia in 17–, with his mother and father-inlaw, Pierre Robichaud. Around 1784, he immigrated to Isle Madame, and about 1787, he left for Havre Boucher, with other members of his wife’s family. Some of his descendants live at Havre Boucher and Tracadie, NS, and Souris, PEI. One of his grandsons was Father Hubert Girroir (1825-1884) (See Cahiers de la SHA, vol 6, #2, june 1975, pp 69-71)

51/J Sansan

J Sanson Jean Baptiste Samson, son of Mathieu Samson and Marguerite Pouget dit LaPierre, was born about 1736, at Port Toulouse. He married, about 1763, Marguerite Francoise Clergé, daughter of Claude Clergé and Francoise Lavergne. Jean Baptiste and Francoise were at L’Ardoise after the “Grand Dérangement”, where Abbeé Bailly baptised 2 of their children. They were among the first colonists of River Bourgeois, where we find Jean’s widow, in the 1811 census, with her sons, Jean, Martin and Louis.

52/J Dugau

J Dugau (Dugas) Joseph Bernard Dugas, son of Abraham Dugas and Marguerite Fougere, was born at Port Toulouse about april 1751. He married about 1777, Anastasie Poirier dite Anastasie Casemate, daughter of Michel Poirier (#5) and Judith Richard. Joseph and Anastasie settled ai Little Arichat (West Arichat) where their only son, Joseph Bernard, continued his lineage. Joseph Bernard Dugas, Sr, died before the census of 1811.

53/F Prevost

F Prevost (Prévost) Francois Prevost, born in France around 1752, married about 1784, Julienne dite Helene Coste, daughter of Claude Coste and Marguerite Vigneau. Francois and Helene left Isle Madame to settle at Tracadie, NS, about 1795, but they returned, to settle at Grand Digue (Poulamond) where they were listed on the 1811 census. Francois died between 17 april 1826, when he sold some land at Poulamond, and 1 march 1834, when his widow and children, sold another piece of land in the same area. The descendants of his only son, Francois Laurent, have changed the name to Provost.

54/J Fougere

J Fougere ( Fougere) Joseph Fougere, son of Jean Fougere and Marie Bourg, was born at Port Royale, 25 april 1720. He married around 1747, Marguerite Coste, daughter of Jacques Coste and Francoise Petitpas. Joseph was a coastal navigator at Port Toulouse, before the Grand Derangement. He was in Arichat, with his wife, in 1771, where 4 of their children were baptised, by Abbe Bailly. They abandoned their land in Arichat, before 1790, so they could leave and settle at Havre Boucher, where Joseph is listed among the taxpayers of 1794. Joseph and Marguerite are the ancestors of the Fougeres of Havre Boucher and Guysborough County.

55/P Girraware

P Girraware (Paul Girouard) Paul Girouard, was born about 1752, in Petit de Grat, son of Pierre Girouard and Cecile Detcheverry.he married about 1772, Angelique Boucher, daughter of Honore Boucher and Marie-Anne marres dit La Sonde. Paul was a fisherman in Arichat, where he had settled, on the south side of the harbour, on a land grant, between his brothers in law, Lawrence Kavanaugh and Pierre Boucher. He died between 1815, when he asked for another land grant in River Inhabitants, and 1824, when his oldest son and namesake, sold a piece of land, as the inheritor of his father.

56/J La Bay Landrie Jun.

J La Bay Landrie Junr Jean Baptiste Landry dit L’Abbé, was born at Pisiguit, about 1739, son of Jean Baptiste Landry (#43) and Marie Josephe LeBlanc. He married on 28 November 1765, at Ile Royale, Marie Dugas, daughter of Abraham Dugas and Marguerite LeBlanc. Jean-Baptiste and Marie accompanied Abraham Dugas and family to Miquelon, where their marriage was revalidated 2 may 1766. All the six children of Jean Baptiste and Marie ere born on Miquelon, but after Marie’s death in 1777, Jean Baptiste returned to Isle Madame. He died after 7 april 1804, the date where he sold some land in West Arichat. There are still many descendants living on the land grant that he received.

57/A L’Avandier

A L’Avannier (L’Avandier) Abraham Lavandier, son of Antoine Lavandier and Francoise Lavergne, was born about 1735, at Port Toulouse. He married, about 1758, Genevieve Bénard, daughter of Pierre Bénard and Cécile Longuépée. Abraham followed his half-brother Louis Petitpas to Chezzetcook in 1760. After 20 years in this area, he moved to Isle Madame. Not long after the date of this document, he moved his family to Havre Boucher, where he received a land grant, in 1809. His descendants in Havre Boucher are known by the name of Levangie, but those on Prince Edward Island, have kept the original name of Lavandier.

58/M Budro

M Budro (Boudreau) Michel Boudreau dit Miquetau, son of Michel Boudreau and Jeanne Fougere, was born about 1755 at Port Toulouse. He married about 1782, Marie LeBlanc, daughter of René LeBlanc (#7) and Anne Blanchard. He settled at Boudreau’s Point in West Arichat, where he was a sailor and owner of a ship. Michel died between 1832 and 1839. According to a legend told to Placide Gauthier by Bernard Pate, (CEA 1.66-18), Michel and his wife were buried in Our Lady of Assumption Church, Arichat, because of all the donations they had made to the parish.

59/N LaBlanc

V LaBlanc (LeBlanc) Hyacinthe dit Elias LeBlanc, son of René LeBlanc (#7) and Anne Blanchard, was born 1 February 1762, and baptized at Arichat 30 July 1771. He married (1) about 1784, Emilie Dugas dite Baie de la Ouine, daughter of Charles Dugas and Félécité Bugeaud, and (2), about 1805, to Anne Vincent , daughter of Simon Vincent and Théotiste Cyr.After a trial period at Caribacou, Hyacinthe settled in West Arichat, where he was sailor and owner of a ship in 1811 and in 1813. He is the Ancestor of the LeBlanc’s of River Bourgeois and Little Bras D’Or.

60/M LaBlanc

M Lablanc (LeBlanc) Mathurin LeBlanc, brother of Hyacinthe, was born at Grand Pré about 1753. He married about 1775, Modeste Catherine Fougere, daughter of Charles Fougere and Madeleine Dugas. Mathurin was involved in the colonization of Caribacou, but on returning to Isle Madame, he definitely settled at Grand Ruisseau (West Arichat), where he was a seaman. He died between 14 November 1822, when he made his will, and 14 Feb 1823, the date this will was recorded in Sydney. Thru his 10 sons, Mathurin is the ancestor of a great many LeBlanc’s in West Arichat and Petit de Grat.

61/J DeRoche

J DeRoche (Alexandre DesRoches) Joseph DesRoches, son of Louis DesRoches and Marguerite Arseneau, was born at Malpeque, Ile St Jean, 3 Jan 1744, and baptized at St Peter of the North, the following 17 may.About 1767, he married Anne Gertrude Landry, daughter of Joseph Landry and Marie-Marguerite Breau. Abbé Bailly revalidated their marriage, in Arichat, on 12 August 1771, where he had built his home. He made his living as a fisherman. Joseph died after 4 August 1821, the date when he had sold some land.

62/A DeRoche

A DeRoche (Alexandre DesRoches) Alexandre DesRoches, brother to Joseph, (#61) was born in Malpeque about 1740, married 4 November 1771 at Arichat, Marie Josse, daughter of Francois Josse and Marie Marguerite Dardy. Alexandre and Marie settled in Arichat. Alexandre died before 1 May 1809, when his widow and their eldest son sold a piece of land in Arichat

63/M Sansan

M Sanson Michel Samson, son of Michel Samson and Jeanne Testard, was born at Port Toulouse, about 1738. He married about 1761, Madeleine Martel, daughter of Jean Baptiste Martel and Marie-Josephe Pouget. Michel seems to have escaped the expulsion of 1758, from Ile Royale, when his parents and all his brothers and sisters were sent to France. He stayed for a few years in L’ Ardoise, where Abbé Bailly revalidated their marriage, 3 October 1771, and baptized their first 5 children. Later, we find him at Petit de Grat, where still live a great number of his descendants.

64/B Martell

B Martell Jean Baptiste Martel, son of Jean-Baptiste Martel and Marie-Josephe Pouget, was born at Port Toulouse about 1739. About 1760, he married Anne Bourel, daughter of Francois Bourel and Madeleine Arseneau. Jean Baptiste and Anne were living in L’Ardoise, at the time when Abbé Bailly, revalidated their marriage 3 October 1771. Later, they moved and settled at Petit de Grat, where Jean Baptiste was a sharecropper in 1811. His lineage continues at Petit de Grat.

65/S Fougere

S Fougere Simon Fougere, son of Charles Fougere and Madeleine Dugas, was born 22 October 1760, and baptised at Arichat, 28 July 1771. He married (1) in 1784, Marguerite Samson, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Samson and Marguerite Francoise Clergé, and (2) about 1812, Madeleine Forest, daughter of Pierre Hilarion Forest (#34) and Marguerite Boudrot. Nicknamed Caniche, Simon
Fougere settled at River Bourgeois, beside the home of his first wife’s family. He became a fisherman. He died in River Bourgeois, 24 June 1843. He is ancestor to the Fougere’s of River Bourgeois and some from Poulamond.

66/J Richard

J Richard Jean Richard was born 22 February 1734, at Beaubassin, son of Alexandre Richard and Marie-Madeleine Thibodeau. He married, about 1766, Marie Th130riot, daughter of René Thériot (#1) and Anne LeBlanc. Jean and Marie had their marriage revalidated in Arichat, 12 August 1771. Later, Jean is found in West Arichat, where he was still living during the census of 1813. He was a widower, at the time.He was not there during the census of 1813. He is ancestor to all the Richard’s of Richmond County.

67/J Fougere

J Fougere Joseph Fougere, son of Joseph Fougere (#54) and Marguerite Coste, was born at Port Toulouse about 1758. He married about 1784, Appoline Boucher, daughter of Honore Boucher and Marie-Anne Marres dit la Sonde.Having settled on Isle Madame, Joseph and Appoline later left to settle at Havre Boucher, where they were on the tax list in 1794. Appoline , following the death of Joseph, returned to Isle Madame, and remarried to Paul Forgeron (#9)

68/P Babane

P Babane (Babin) Pierre Babin was born at Grand Pré, about 1753, son of Honore Babin and Anne LeBlanc. He married, about 1775, Marie Boudrot, daughter of Joseph Boudrot and Judith Fougere. Pierre, the only son of Honore and Anne, was transported with them to Massachusetts, in 1755. After 8 years of living in Braintree, the Babin family returned to Acadia. Pierre devoted his life to maritime life; finally reaching the rank of ship’s captain.He was among the first church wardens at Arichat, in 1803. The fact that he was chosen as executor for René Thériot’s will, and then replaced, we know that he died shortly before 16 July 1806. Before his death, he had applied for a land grant, which his wife received and is still known as Babin’s Hill.

69/C Fougere

C Fougere Charles Fougere, son of Joseph Fougere (#54) and Marguerite Coste, was born 30 November 1760, and baptised at Arichat, 28 July 1771. He married, probably close to the date of this document, to Marie Modeste Richard, daughter of Charles Richard and Anne Bonnevie.Charles and his spouse, Marie, left to settle at Havre Boucher, where they were listed as taxpayers, on the list of 1794. Mostly all their children stayed in Havre Boucher, except for 3 of his daughters, who married men from Isle Madame.

70/C Devoe

C Devoe (Deveau) Charlemagne dit Charles Deveau, son of Pierre Deveau and Marie Caissie, was born at Beaubassin, 20 July 1720. He married (1) about 1740, Anne Doucet, as yet, not identified, and (2) about 1751, Marie Gaudet, daughter of Guillaume Gaudet and Marie Boudrot. Charles Deveau lived at Tintamarre, before the Grand Derangement. After the fall of Fort Beausejour, he took refuge at the Boy of Chaleurs, where he was listed on the census of 1760. He went to Ile St Jean, and from there to Miquelon in 1765. He was found again in 1771, at D’Escousse. The Deveau’s of Richmond County, are descendants of his son, Joseph, (#40), and some of the Deveau’s of Cheticamp, are descendants of his son, Augustin.

Transcription: Obituary for Christian Busse; 1823-1909.

 

The following is my transcription of the obituary published in the Cook County Herald on Friday, March 26, 1909 for Christian Busse – 4th great grandfather to our children.

 

HONORABLE CHRISTIAN BUSSE

 

Obituary for Christian Busse.
Obituary for Christian Busse.

Christian Busse died at his home in Elk Grove township at 3 o’clock Wednesday morning, March 24, 1909, aged 85 years, 7 months, 14 days.

Christian Frederick Busse was born at Badeke, Konigreich, Hanover, Germany, Aug. 10, 1823. He married Miss Fredericke Henges March 26, 1848, and they came to America the same spring, accompanied by his father, mother, two brothers, Friedrich and Louis, and two sisters, Louisa and Hannah (his other brother, Henry, having come over six months previous). Hon. John Fasse and affianced, Miss Charlotte Kehe, also came over on the same boat.

July 1, 1848, Mr. and Mrs. Busse came to Elk Grove and settled on the farm where they lived happily sixty one years. March 26, 1898, the esteemed couple celebrated their golden wedding, with their numerous relatives and friends as their honored guests. They were earnest Christian people, and the first members of Elk Grove Lutheran congregation.

Mr. Busse was highly respected as a capable, honest man, beloved by all who knew him. The people showed their confidence in his integrity by electing him to many offices of trust. He served on the Cook County board three years, from Dec. 1, 1873, to Dec. 1, 1876; was a member of the state board of equalization, representing the old Fourth congressional district two terms, eight years, at Springfield, from 1880 to 1888, and (like his lifelong friend, Hon. John Fasse of Schaumburg) served as supervisor of his home town, Elk Grove, twenty-five years. He was a stalwart republican and went to the election last fall and voted for William H. Taft for President.

Four weeks ago the aged veteran became weak and tired and laid himself down, but had no pains whatsoever. Thus this upright man serenely passed away from earthly cares to his heavenly abode, where his beloved, lingering widow will soon meet him to enjoy eternal bliss.

The funeral will take place from the home of his son to St. John’s Elk Grove, Lutheran church at one o’clock Friday, March 26.

Deceased leaves surviving his aged widow, one son, Henry W. Busse, three daughters, Louise (Mrs. Conrad Schwake), Hannah (Mrs. August Froemling) and Fredericke (Mrs. John Russel), (Friedrich, the eldest son, died eighteen years ago.) Thirty grandchildren and twenty-seven great-grandchildren, also two brothers, Frederich and Henry, and one sister, Mrs. Louisa Tonne, and numerous relatives to revere his memory.

 

Let’s all work to save and expand our genealogical resources.

 

I have been researching my family’s genealogy for over twenty years and my appreciation of the tireless and volunteer contributions in the pursuit of genealogy is endless.

 

All of our continuing efforts to expand our own genealogies do contribute to the cumulative effort of us all to save and expand our genealogical resources.

 

At one time, the only options for researching outside one’s own community were to depend on the mail system at the time or to travel to the location involved.

Although mail was relatively inexpensive, the flexibility of performing research oneself was lost. There was no opportunity to just dive right in and pursue a lead found in the return information. One would then have to mail another request, and then another, and then another – making this process time-consuming.

Submit Hall
Submit Hall

Travel to the location(s) in question could be very expensive, but resulted in the opportunity to pursue leads found while on site. If new information led to other organizations, agencies, museums, archives, etc. within the area, it was possible to also visit and do further research. This option provided a much more timely method of researching.

Genealogy has evolved considerably with the advent of the personal computer. Now, one can travel the world, visit museums and historical sites, communicate with organizations virtually, as well as doing research using free and paid sites online. The immediacy and flexibility of researching genealogy is something to be marveled at.

How was this possible?

This evolution started with passionate and dedicated volunteers and individuals who began transcribing physical records, collecting photos and images of documents, and placing them in online archives, databases and in specialty archive sites. For the most part, these resources were free and available to everyone.

With some sadness, I have watched a major shift take place in the short time since I began. As the popularity of genealogy became evident, commercial sites and paid services suddenly appeared online – the most noted of which being Ancestry.com .

Barker, William Sr. - Accused in Salem Witch Trials
Barker, William Sr. – Accused in Salem Witch Trials

It was still possible to find considerable free information and resources online, but those who had the funds and wanted to save time and effort could pay for subscriptions to make their search easier. Those of us with limited funds began setting up our own sites posting tips and information for other genealogists.

The newest shift I’ve been seeing is the trend for paid services and sites to ‘buy out’ free resources and add them to their paid catalog, leaving paid sites as the only option.

I still consider genealogy as a historical ‘treasure hunt’, one which I pursue with great effort and pleasure. I love nothing better than to discover an obscure site offering valuable information and this blog has provided the venue for me to post this information and assist others.

All links I find to valuable sites can be found in the ‘Genealogy Links’ tab above. Another update with dozens of new links will be completed soon.

Ambler, Joseph and Williams, Ann Wedding Certificate. Let's all work to save and expand our genealogical resources.
Ambler, Joseph and Williams, Ann Wedding Certificate.  Let’s all work to save and expand our genealogical resources.

I think it is important for us to try and preserve the free resources that remain, and possibly add new ones. This is only possible through the efforts of volunteers and the willingness of those of us researching to share information for free. I have made all information from my research available in the ‘Blythe Database’ in the tab above, including sources. Unfortunately, in order to include photos and images, I would have to start my own server. I do wish I could though, because the gold in the genealogy treasure for me has always been photos and images of documents, etc. I will say, though, that the images in my articles are either owned by me, credited to the rightful owner or under free commons license (credit requirements). Feel free to use any images on my site, but please be sure to include the photo credit. A credit to this site on the ones I own (uncredited) would be appreciated.

How can we all help to encourage and preserve free information?

Here are just a few ideas.

  • Start a website of your own and freely post any information you are willing to share.
  • Donate physical items to genealogical and historical societies, museums, libraries and archives that provide free services to the field.
  • Start a newsletter or contribute to existing newsletters to collect and provide information to other researchers.
  • Offer your services to anyone researching in your area through services such as RAOGK (Random Acts of Genealogical Kindness), which has since shut down indefinitely due to the illness and death of its Administrator, Bridgett Schneider.
  • Volunteer in ways to add to or improve what is available. Examples include transcription of documents, taking and submitting photographs of historical and/or genealogical importance, voluntary work at a location providing free services and resources, and conducting and documenting interviews for first hand accounts.

I am still actively pursuing my research and operating my sites, Empty Nest Ancestry and Blythe Genealogy. All data I’ve accumulated, including images, documents, links and sources is available for free access and download on Blythe Genealogy. Feel free to check it out by searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the upper drop down menu.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

If you have new information of relevance to genealogy, or are willing to volunteer your services to provide research in your area on behalf of others and would like to spread the word about your own efforts in this regard, or just plain news of interest, please let me know and I’d be glad to post it here.

Guest posts are welcomed but are subject to Editor review and may not be accepted. If accepted, the author will be given credit for the article and can include two nofollow links.

Please consider making information you have available to others in any way possible and for as little cost as possible and volunteer and/or donate to those who do if you can. Let’s keep our voluntary and free networks operating and providing for researchers in the future.

Cardinal Henry Beaufort

 

Cardinal Henry Beaufort (de Beaufort) was born in 1375 in Castle Beaufort, Anjou, France to Sir John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster (1340- ) and Katharine (de Roët ) Swynford (c. 1350 – 1403), widow of Sir Hugh Swynford of Lincolnshire.

 

Cardinal Henry Beaufort

Once the governess to John’s daughters from his first marriage, she became his mistress, subsequently bearing him more children.

Her children were made legitimate September 1, 1396 by Pope Boniface IX and February 9, 1397 by charter of King Richard II, but were excluded from the succession.

Cardinal Henry’s progression began with his becoming Dean of Wells Cathedral, Somerset, England and Chancellor of Oxford University in 1397, at the age of 22.

In 1399, upon the accession of his half -brother, Henry IV, in 1399, he was assured a prominent place and high influence in politics.

He continued to rise rapidly, becoming Chancellor of England and a Royal Councillor in 1403, and Bishop of Winchester in 1404.

In 1413, he resigned his chancellorship and led the opposition of the council to the King’s Chief Minister, Thomas Arundel, Archbishop of Canterbury. However, he regained his chancellorship when his nephew and ally became king as Henry V in the same year.

Highly ambitious and striving to climb still higher, he sought and obtained a position with the papacy when Pope Martin V made him a cardinal in 1417. The king feared that Beaufort would be too effective as spokesman for the papacy and subsequently forced him to resign.

Castle Beaufort
Beaufort Castle

 

After the accession of the infant King, Henry VI in 1422, however, Beaufort flourished yet again.

A very wealthy man by this time, he expanded his fortune by lending money at inflated interest rates to the financially troubled crown, which further entrenched him in his position of power, making him virtually invulnerable to his enemies.

In 1426, he was made papallegate and Cardinal of St. Eusebius, for which his uncle, Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, continually criticized him for conflict of interest by holding positions of power in both the church and state.

Beaufort’s power and influence enabled him to remain unharmed by the attacks by Duke Humphrey.

In 1435 and 1439 he failed in his attempts to negotiate the end of the Hundred Years’ War between England and France.

Henry gained even more power on July 14, 1438 when he became Bishop of Lincoln. While in this position, he had an affair with a woman whose identity is speculation at best, due to a lack of documentation. Some believe this woman was Alice FitzAlan (1378-1415), daughter to Richard FitzAlan and Elizabeth de Bohun.

An illegitimate daughter, Jane Beaufort, was born to this relationship in 1402. This relationship is made credible by the mention of Jane and her husband Sir Edward Stradling in Cardinal Beaufort’s will.

Henry retired from politics in 1443, died April 11, 1447 at Wolsey Palace in Winchester, and was buried at Winchester Cathedral.

 

Cardinal Henry Beaufort was 22nd great grandfather to my children.

 

________________

Sources:

Foundation for Medieval Genealogy; http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm

Encyclopædia Britannica CD ’97, HENRY BEAUFORT

Wikipedia.org; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Beaufort

Transcription: Baptism record of Elizabeth Chamberlaine of Harrington, Northamptonshire, 2 Sep 1676.

 

The following is my transcription of two pages of parish records including that of the baptism record of Elizabeth Chamberlaine of Harrington, Northamptonshire of 2 Sep 1676.

 

Chamberlaine, Elizabeth; Northamptonshire, England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1532-1812

2

Son of Wm Danford & Elizab~ his wife …ized March 15

3

1674
Clement Clypson was buryed Decemb~ 15.
Lawrence Violls Sheapheard buryed March ye 8.
Johnes Perkins Rector.

1676
Christenings
Ann the daughter of George Dimbleby & Ffrances his wife was baptized March ye 27.
Sarah ye daughter of Ffrancis Billingham was baptized July ye 12.
Margarett the daughter of John Magnes Gent. & Barbara his wife was baptized August the 27.
Sarah the daughter of Robt Fiolls and Eliz: his wife was baptized September the 4.
Elizabeth the daughter of Thomas Chamberlaine and Elizabeth his wife baptized Septembe ye ii.
Henry ye sonn of Wm Turner and Ann his wife was baptized October the iith
John the sonn of John Perkins Rector and Merty his wie was borne October ye i6 and baptized October the 20.
Christopher ye sonn of Christophe Bradshaw and Elizab: his wife was baptized Novembe the 20.
Jane the daughter of Samuel Sutton and Jane his wife was baptized March the i6th.
John Perkins Rector.

1675
Marriages
John Bugby and Ann Ekins both of Harrington were marryed April the i5.
Francis Greene of Harrington and Ann Panther of Daisborough were marryed May ye 23.
Thomas Bennett of Clipston and Anne Tanner of Daisborough were marryed June the i7.
James Smith of Marston and Lidia Linnett of Gumbly County of Leiceste were marryed Aug: ye i2.
Richard Ligiard and Mary Peats both of Wellingborough were marryed September the ii.
John Heblethwait of Pychly Clerke and Mary Hurst of Danton were marryed Septembe the i4.
Wm Green & Elizabeth Harlock both of Harrington were marryed the 23.
Christopher Ellis and Mary Violls both of Orton were marryed O ctober the i0th.
John Langton of Harborow & Mary Kendall of Oxender were marryed October ye i4th.
John Baldwin of Bowden parva & Elizab: Sprigg of Farndon were marryed October the 2i.
Edward Burton of Bowden parva & Frances Moore of Braybrooke were marryed December ye i0th.
Thomas Casteland of Oakely Magna and Mary Hull of ????? were marryed December the 27.

Transcription: Baptism record of Elizabeth Chamberlaine of 2 Sep 1676.
Transcription: Baptism record of Elizabeth Chamberlaine of 2 Sep 1676.