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Transcription: A List of Children at the State House in Philadelphia; June 19, 1761

A List of Children at the State House in Philadelphia; June 19, 1761

 

By AUTHORITY.

A LIST of CHILDREN now at the State-Houfe, in Philadelphia, who in the Courfe of the War, were taken Captives from feveral Parts of this Province by the Indians, and have been lately releafed by His Excellency General  A M H E R S T, and fent to this Government, in order to their being delivered up to their Parents, or other Relations, who are hereby d?????? forthwith to come and receive them.

Advertisement re children taken hostage by Indians
Advertisement re children taken hostage by Indians.

NICHOLAS SILVIAS, of Plow-Park.

JOHN MAN, of Marsh-Creek.

FREDERICK PAYER, of Low-Bergen.

ISAAC TOOPLE, taken near Prefque Ifle.

ANNE COON, and MARY WILLIAMS, taken on the Delaware.

Philadelphia, June 19, 1761.

from the Pennsylvania Gazette.

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Transcription: Biography of Jehu Burkett and Family

The following is a transcription of a biography of Jehu Burkett and his family, taken from the publication, “BURKHART — BURCKHARDT — BURKET — BURKETT.”

Burket Family Bio
Burket Family Bio – Wogaman, Burkett, Holdery; Page 1

 

Wogaman, Burkett, Holdery 2
Burket Family Bio – Wogaman, Burkett, Holdery; Page 2

lt has been said that Emanuel Burkhart whose home was in one of the Swiss Cantons, probably Berne, had two sons who came to America, sometime between 1742 and 1754. One of these is said to have been Jonathan and the other Christian. Rupp’s records no persons by either of these names, until the arrival on November 22, 1752, on the ship St. Michael, of Johann Burckhard, and on September 24, 1753, the arrival on the ship Neptune, of Johannes Burkhart. There is listed, however, the arrival on the ship Rosanna, on September 26, 1745, of Heinrich Burckhart. This person so nearly fits in with the known facts of the case, as to lead to the belief that this Henry, to use the English equivalent of his first name, was the progenitor of the family under discussion, in America. There is not much support to the traditional name of Jonathan, and it could easily be the case, in any event, that like thousands of others, there was the first name “Johan”, by which he might have been known, but omitted from the registration. It is stated that the immigrant’s wife died at sea, and that the father died four years after arrival. There were four children, Salome, probably the eldest, born August 14, 1734, Jehu, Nathaniel, and probably another boy said to have been named Christian. Salome, according to well authenticated statements, was seven years of age upon arrival, and this fact, as well as her marriage in 1759, she being then of marriageable age, seems to be controlling in fixing the approximate time of the arrival in America, that is at about the time of the arrival of Henry as above stated. Jehu married Madalene (Motlene) Croll or Kroll, who was the daughter of Ulric Croll, of Elizabeth township, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, who came to America on August 19, 1729, aged 27 years, on the ship Mortonhouse. The brothers moved to Frederick county, Maryland, residing and working there at their trade, as well as farming, from about 1768 to 1775, after which Jehu and family moved to Reedy creek on the Yadkin, Rowan county, North Carolina. About 1809, Jehu moved to Montgomery county, Ohio, and became the owner of a 112-acre tract located on Salem pike, a few miles north of the city of Dayton, opposite the Brethren church at Ft. McKinley. ]ehu died in 1823, and his wife a few years before. He was the first Bishop or Elder of the church of the Brethren (Dunkard) in this vicinity, and assisted in the organization of the Lower Stillwater church of that denomination (still flourishing at Ft. McKinley) and out of which church sprung the church at “Happy Corners.” Despite his connection with one of the peace loving sects,.Jehu seems to have served in the North Carolina troops in the Revolution, as there is an entry in the Army accounts “of that state which would indicate that he was paid a fairly large sum presumably for military services. Again, in a muster roll of Capt. Andrew Long’s company of Col. Samuel Miles’ rifle regiment of Pennsylvania troops, taken on June 4, 1776, appears the name of “Jehu Burket”. This company came from western Bucks county, and there is authority for the statement that Jehu’s wife’s people were, or had been, formerly residents of that region. It could easily be possible that Jehu had returned to Pennsylvania before finally settling in North Carolina, and enrolled for a short time only as the records of that company would indicate, after which he returned to Maryland or North Carolina. From the extreme infrequency of the name Jehu, and the singular fact of it being attached in this case to the last name “Burket”, it appears to the writer as more than a coincidence. This conclusion might be further justified from the fact of the somewhat roving disposition of the person in question, who in the course of his life, removed three or four different times, and to distant points. Jehu and Motlene had nine children, Henry being the fourth. He, Henry, was born on May 13, 1771, in Maryland. On December 25, 1793, Henry married Elizabeth Rinker, in North Carolina,“ who was born on June 22, 1772, and who died on February 9, 1836. About 1815 or 1816 this family came to Montgomery county, where Henry’s father had already located. Henry acquired 400 or more acres of land on the so-called Stringtown pike, in Madison township, about a mile or so north of the village of Trotwood, and about the same distance west of the settlement on the Salem pike formerly known as Taylorsburg. He died in September 1817, leaving a will which was probated in due course. Henry and Elizabeth had the following children, all born in North Carolina: Mary (sometimes called Mollie) born October 27,1794; John, born December 27, 1795; George, born November 23, 1797; Elizabeth, born September 7, 1801; Isaac, born February 3, 1803; Charles, born March 13,1805; Amelia, born December 8, 1807; Anne, born December 8, 1809; Martin, born October 5, 1811; and Barbara, born April 20, 1815.

As previously stated in this narrative, Mary the first child of Henry and Elizabeth, married John Wogaman the second, on August 18, 1818, and their child was George, who married Catherine Hilderbrick on June 15, 1843. She was born on July 17, 1824, the daughter of David and Mary Hilderbrick, and Mary was the daughter of George and Elizabeth Holtry.

In connection with what has been said as to Jehu Burket, it should be mentioned that the material is based somewhat on a History of the Burgner family, published in 1892. This narrates an interview, in 1889, with a granddaughter of Salome Burket. This granddaughter well remembered Salome the sister of Jehu. She had married a Burgner, and after her husband’s death lived in Maryland near Frederick. Also, a pamphlet on the Burket family, prepared by Mr. John M. Burkett of Washington, D. C., has been useful and most essential in establishing some of the important facts of the story of this family. lt should also be mentioned that the family migrated in large numbers to Indiana in the early part of the nineteenth century, and many members have achieved prominence both in civil and professional walks of life, including farming and other lines of business.

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Transcription: Biography of Ervin Thornton and his family, of Tappen, New York.

Transcription: Biography of Ervin Thornton and his family, of Tappen, New York.

[Tappen, 1878 – 1966]

ERVIN THORNTON

Ervin Thornton family biography.
Ervin Thornton family biography.

On September 12. 1948 Ervin Thornton and Wynola Dewald were united in marriage in the Lutheran Church at Dawson. They were the first couple to be married in this church after it was moved there from Gackle. They made their home in Steele in a  home that was known as the “old Hi Maw House” from north of Tappen. Wynola’s father Christ Dewald moved it from Tappen to Dawson where it was for several years, then he moved it to Steele into the block next to the Archie Thornton home. This was their home for two years.

Ervin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Archie Thornton of Steele. was born in 1925 at Steele where he made his home and received his education. Ervin was the only boy in a family of four children. Rumor has it that at a very young age he was very handy with a sling shot. He could hit many targets but he was especially good at hitting a bent-over target. At the age of 16 he went to Portland, Oregon and worked on a housing project with his father. In 1944 he joined the Navy serving one ear in the states and one overseas in Japan. After his discharge he went into the trucking business for himself.

Wynola, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Christ Dewald, was born in 1930 in Napoleon. At the age of three she moved with her parents to a country store south of Dawson. She attended her elementary grades at a country school while living there. During her freshman year in high school, which she attended in Streeter, her  family moved to Dawson. Wynola graduated from Dawson High School in 1947. The following year she taught school south of Tappen in a country school near the Art J. Werre farm. After being married she taught one year north of Dawson and three years west of Steele.

In 1950 they purchased the Hoffer truckline and moved to Tappen where they are still living at present. Ervin and Wynola are the parents of four children: Donivan 15. Nanette 13, Bradley 11, and Wendell 9.

They are members of the St. John’s Lutheran Church in Tappen where Wynola teaches Sunday School and is a member of the Ladies Aid. In the fifteen years they have lived in Tappen they have found the people to be true friends and they enioy living there very much.

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Tragic gas poisoning deaths of Daniel and Isabella McDougall.

 

I have found myself fascinated by the stories of the trials, tribulations and tragedies of our ancestors, and this story about the deaths by gas poisoning of Daniel and Isabella McDougall tragically caused by their daughter, Agnes is no exception.

 

Story of Daniel and Isabella McDougall.
Fitchburg Daily Sentinal article of November 21, 1907 – deaths by gas poisoning. Story of Daniel and Isabella McDougall.

Sometimes I wonder if I was born too late as my disability, though hidden from others, is completely disabling to me and for the most part is attributable to dealing with highly stressful work, home, family and personal circumstances.

I’ve always thought of earlier times before the onset of modern technology as being quieter and more peaceful.

Then I read a story like the one I’m about to tell you and realize there are definitely some advantages to living in our own time. No wonder we live such long lives compared to theirs.

Then I think about the risks of the industry, technology and society of our day and realize that we live with risks as well, just not the same ones.

This story is about the family of a 19 year old girl, Sara Agnes (Agnes) McDougall, who was living at an inn / boarding house in the Boston area in Cambridge, Massachusetts with her parents, Daniel Martin (b. 18 Aug 1862 in PEI, Canada) and Elizabeth “Isabella” (Hume) McDougall (b. about 1869, also in PEI, Canada), while working in the area.

Daniel had been a schoolteacher and had lived in Morrell, PEI, teaching at the Church Street School until 1906.

On the fateful night of November 20, 1907, the coin operated gas lights had burned out and Daniel and Isabella McDougall retired to sleep, leaving the gas switch in the ‘on’ position. With these lights, once the gas ran out, it was necessary to insert another quarter to restore the flow of gas to the light.

Agnes returned home from a party and promptly inserted a quarter to light the room as she prepared to retire for the night. Once finished, she turned off the light, but still having time left on the meter, the gas continued to flow into her parents’ room as they slept. Daniel and Isabella died of gas poisoning.

The November 21, 1907 edition of the Fitchburg Daily Sentinel of Fitchburg, Massachusetts printed an account of the deaths as follows:

COUPLE KILLED BY GAS

Cambridge, Mass., Nov. 21 — Mr. and Mrs. Daniel McDougall of 25 Market Street are dead, and their three children left orphans, as a result of the careless use of a quarter-in-the-slot gas machine at their home. Their daughter, Agnes McDougall, the unfortunate cause of the accident, has been almost prostrated since it occurred.

The bodies of Daniel and Isabella McDougall were returned to PEI by train from Cambridge, Massachusetts.

As recounted by family, Duncan MacDougall, Daniel’s brother, brought them home for burial in the Church of Scotland cemetary in Bangor, PEI. Duncan’s daughter, Violet, stated that the wake was held in Cambridge. Their daughter, Agnes was completely distraught, “wringing her hands and saying over and over, ‘Oh my goodness, I’ve murdered my parents.'”

Family members never knew Agnes had caused the tragedy until a newspaper article was found in 1996.

Sources:

  1. “Couple Killed By Gas”; Fitchburg Daily Sentinel; Fitchburg, Cambridge, Massachusetts; November 21, 1907. (See above.)
  2. “Massachusetts, Death Records, 1841-1915,” database, Ancestry.com ” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>Ancestry.com . (See below.)
  3. 1881 Census, Kings, Prince Edward Island, district Lot 61, Kings, Prince Edward Island; Roll: C_13164; Page: 55; Family No: 222, Page: 55, House 216; Family 222, Hume ; digital, Ancestry.com . (See below.)
  4. 1891 Canadian Census, Lot 40, Kings, Prince Edward Island, Roll: T-6382; Family No: 2, district 133, Page: 1, Household: 2, McDougall ; digital image, Ancestry.com ” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>Ancestry.com . (See below.)
McDougall, Isabella (Hume); Massachusetts Death Records, deaths by gas poisoning.
Massachusetts Death Records, deaths by gas poisoning.

 

1881 Canadian Census showing Isabella Hume.
1881 Canadian Census showing Isabella Hume.

Transcription: News article re John Lambert Cadwalader

John Lambert Cadwalader, Collector of the Port of Philadelphia: Chester Times article, Race for Deputy Collector, Chester, Pennsylvania, About August, 1885, Col. 3

 

RACE FOR DEPUTY COLLECTOR
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The Efforts Being Made to Secure Samuel Lyon’s Position in this City

Transcription: News article re John Lambert Cadwalader as Collector of the Port of Philadelphia
News article re John Lambert Cadwalader as Collector of the Port of Philadelphia

President Cleveland last week appointed John Cadwalader as Collector of the Port of Philadelphia, in place of General Hartranft, who has ably filled that position for the past four years. In making his changes in that department Mr. Cadwalader will discover that the city of Chester is entitled to his consideration to the extent of one appointment, that of Deputy Collector of the Port. The present incumbent is Samuel Lyons, Esq., and the Democrats who desire to step into his shoes are numerous, although in the opinion of most of the members of that party with whom we have talked the actual contest has narrowed down to two persons.

Peter Mundy, the Market street grocer, was months ago spoken of as a candidate for that place as soon as any change was contemplated, and his claims have since been steadily advanced by zealous friends. This gentleman is highly esteemed by all citizens, both in and out of his own party. He has been a resident of the Middle ward for over 25 years, 20 years of which time he has voted the Democratic ticket, besides taking an active part in all organizations and movements of his party. Besides this he is a gentleman of sound business ability, and ranks high in the estimation of the public.

Mr. Mundy’s principal rival in the race is John B. Sanville, the South ward spar builder, whose petition is being extensively signed. Mr. Sanville’s friends claim that he is especially adapted to the position from his through knowledge of vessels and shipping interests.

Some of our citizens are inclined to doubt the appointment of anybody to this post. They say that the office was originally created as a favor to the Hon. William Ward, then member of Congress from this district, but now that the era of retrenchment has been inaugurated it may be considered unnecessary extravagance to support such an office here any longer. However, this may be, of course, only time and the action of Collector Cadwalader can tell.

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The image of the image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for Leonard Scott Keefer and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.