All things history and genealogy.

All things history and genealogy.

Tag: Family Genealogies

Transcription – Obituary for Doyle Clement Cadwallader

 

Obituary of Doyle Clement Cadwallader

 

Obituary of Doyle Clement Cadwallader
Obituary of Doyle Clement Cadwallader

10/20/1944 Press Gazette

 

OBITUARY

 

“In the midst of life we are in death.
In the moment that ye think not,
In the twinkling of an eye,
The Angel of Death may appear.”

The foregoing quotation seems to me very fitting for Doyle Clement Cadwallader, whose death was caused by an automobile accident while he was returning home on September 30, 1944, when the last chapter was written in the book of his earthly life. It had been a short, simple but kindly story, the story of a good son and brother.

Doyle was next to the youngest of ten children, five sisters and four brothers, all living and all, were at his bedside when he passed away, in Hale Hospital, Wilmington, Ohio. The sons of Ira and Nannie Wilkin Cadwallader, he was born near Danville, Ohio, on March 15, 1925; and died on October 12, 1944, aged 19 years, 6 months and 17 days.

Doyle was a graduate of the Hillsboro High School in the class of ’42, after which he was employed as Desk Clerk and Bookkeeper at the Parker Hotel, in Hillsboro. On December 1, 1943, he enlisted in the Merchant Marine and served on a supply ship during the invasion of Southern France. He was home on a thirty-day furlough and would have retired to his duties on October 6th had the fatal accident not occurred.

He was united with the Church of Christ in Danville in his early boyhood days, where he still remained a member until his death.

While we have known his parents most all our lives, yet it was only since he began working at the hotel that we learned to know Doyle. Many times we discussed the present day trend of events as compared with those of yesterday. He was outspoken but tactful, showed a very high degree of intelligence and a promising future — A Friend.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

Originally posted 2015-12-17 15:32:50. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Genealogy Transcription: New England Marriages Prior to 1700; Kni – Kno.

 

Following is my transcription of “New England Marriages Prior to 1700″ for surnames starting with ‘K’ from Knight to Knowles, and all varied surnames of spouses.

 

_________________________________

 

NEW ENGLAND MARRIAGES PRIOR TO 1700

 

Knight - U.S., New England Marriages Prior to 1700

445

KNIGHT, Joseph (1673-) & Martha (GIBSON) LILLEY, w Reuben; 4 Apr 1699; Woburn
KNIGHT, Lawrence (-1728) & Elizabeth INGERSOLL, m/2 John BATTEN 1729; 2 Nov 1696; Salem
KNIGHT, Macklin?/Mautlyn?/Matting? & Dorothy _?_; b 1643; Boston
KNIGHT, Michael & Mary BULLARD; 20 Oct 1657; Woburn
KNIGHT, Nathan & Mary [WESTBROOK]; b Mar 1693/4; Portsmouth/Scarboro
KNIGHT, Philip (-1668) & Margery __?__, ?m/2 Thomas BATEMAN, m/3 Nathaniel BALL 1670/1; b 1647; Charlestown/Topsfield
KNIGHT, Philip & Margaret [WILKINS]; b 1669; Topsfield
KNITE, Philip (1669-1696) & Rebecca [TOWNE] (1668-); b 20 Aug 1693; Topsfield
KNIGHT, Richard (1602-1683) & Agnes [COFFLEY?] (-1679); b 1632; Newbury
KNIGHT, Richard & 1/wf __?_; Hampton, NH
KNIGHT, Richard & Dinah ? ; b 15 May 1642; Boston Y
KNIGHT, Richard (-1680) & 2/wf? [Sarah ROGERS] (-1685+); b 16 Jan 1648(9?), b 1647?, 1648+/- Newport, RI
KNIGHT, Richard & Joanna __?__ (not Ann CROMWELL, w Thomas, m/3 John JOYLIFFE/JOLIFFE, see Robert KNIGHT); b 1652?; Boston
KNIGHT, Richard & Julian __?__; b 1664; Boston
KNIGHT, Richard & Hannah (TOWNSEND) HULL [ALLEN], w Thomas, w Hope, m/4 Richard WAY 1687; b 1680; Boston/Dover, NH?
KNIGHT, Richard & Remember GRAFFTON/GRAFTON; 10 Apr 1685; Marblehead/Boston
KNIGHT, Richard & Sarah [KEMBALL] (-1727, New London); b 1689; Charlestown
KNIGHT, Richard & __?__; b 1690; RI
KNIGHT, Richard (1666-) & Elizabeth [JAQUES] (1669-); b 1697; Newbury
KNIGHT, Robert (1585, 1590-1676) (ae 86 in 1671?) & _?__; b 1631, ca 1620?; York, ME
KNIGHT, Robert (ae 51 in 1666) & 1/wf b 1640; Boston/Salem/Marblehead/Manchester
KNIGHT, Robert (-1655) & 2/wf Ann CROMWELL, w Thomas, m/3 John JOYLIFFE 1656/7; b 1652; Boston
KNIGHT, Robert (1667—1739+) & 1/wf Abigail WILLSON/WILSON; 3 Feb 1686; Ipswich/Manchester
KNIGHT, Roger (1596-1673) & [Anne] __?__; b 1636, b 13 Jul 1633; ?Portsrnouth, NH
KNIGHT, Samuel (1649-) & Amy [CARLE]; ca 1670, bef 27 Jul 1676; Kittery, ME
KNIGHT, Samuel (-by 1715) & Sarah ( __?__ ) HOW, w Abraham; 16 Oct 1685; Roxbury
KNIGHT, Samuel (1675-1721) & Rachel CHASE, m/2 S. MUNKLEY; 19 Jul 1700; Tisbury/Charlestown/Sudbury
KNIGHT, Walter & Elizabeth __?__ (-1634?); b 1610?
KNIGHT, Walter (1587-) & ?2/wf [?Ruth GRAY]; b I642, b 1620?, 1635?; Salem
KNIGHT, William (-1655/6) & 1/wf [?Emma POTTER]; b 1638, b 1635?; Salem/Lynn
KNIGHT, William (-1655/6) & 2/wf Elizabeth (?LEE) BALLARD/BULLARD], W William, m/3 Allen BREAD; aft 1639; Salem
KNIGHT, _ ?__ & Sarah __?__ (1665-1727): New London
KNIGHT, __?__ & Sarah __?__; Boston
KNIGHT, Walter & __?__; b 1651; Braveboat Harbor
KNOTT, Andrew & Susanna __?__; b 1689; Boston
KNOTT, George (-1648) & Martha ? _ (-1673/4); b 1630?, b 1634; Sandwich
KNOTT, Richard (-1684) & Hannah (DEVEREUX) [GREENFIELD], w Peter, m/ 3 Joseph SOUTH by 1689; ca 1674?, aft 1672, ca 1672; Marblehead
KNOWER/KNOWES, George (1617, 1697?-1675) & Elizabeth __? _; b 1650; Charlestown
KNOWER, Jonathan & Sarah [WINSLOW]; b 1685, b 1680; Malden/Charlestown
KNOWLES, Alexander (-1663) & __?__; b 1634?; Fairfield, CT
KNOWLES, Edward (1671-1740) & 1/wf Ann RIDLEY; 27 Feb 1699/1700; Eastham
KNOWLES, Eleazer (?1645-1731) & Mary _ ? _ (-1732); ca 1681?, b 1683; Woodbury, CT
KNOLLYS, Rev. Hanser (1598-1691, in Eng) & Anne? …ENEY (-1671, in 63rd y); Dover, NH/Eng
KNOWLES, Henry (?1609-1670) & _ ? _ [POTTER] (-1670+); b 1645; Warwick, Rl
KNOWLES, Henry & __?__
KNOLLES, John (-1685) & Elizabeth (WILLIS?/BILLS?], w Ephraim DAVIS?; b 1641; Watertown/Eng
KNOWLES, John (-1705) & Jemima ASTEN/AUSTIN (1641-]; 10 Jul 1660; Hampton, NH

____________________

The complete original scans of any documents clips linked above can be accessed by clicking the images.

To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, search using the linked names above or the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link, both in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on these sites is available for free access and download.

 

Originally posted 2016-03-29 08:58:38. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

The ancestor quest: humor, poems and prose for Genealogists.

I have gathered and transcribed several items of humor, poems and prose for Genealogists that have touched me in some way. The ones I have selected and printed below are my favorites of the hundreds that can be found – and the ones that hit home the most.

__________

Dear Ancestor

 

Your tombstone stands among the rest;
Neglected and alone
The name and date are chiseled out
On polished, marbled stone.
It reaches out to all who care
It is too late to mourn.
You did not know that I exist
You died and I was born.
Yet each of us are cells of you
In flesh, in blood, in bone.
Our blood contracts and beats a pulse
Entirely not our own.
Dear Ancestor, the place you filled
So many years ago
Spreads out among the ones you left
Who would have loved you so.
I wonder if you lived and loved,
I wonder if you knew
That someday I would find this spot,
And come to visit you.

__________

 

 Genealogy – where you confuse the dead and irritate the living.

__________

 

Murphy’s Law for Genealogists

 

The public ceremony in which your distinguished ancestor participated and at which the platform collapsed under him turned out to be a hanging.

When at last after much hard work you have solved the mystery you have been working on for two years, your aunt says, “I could have told you that.”

You grandmother’s maiden name that you have searched for four years was on a letter in a box in the attic all the time.

You never asked your father about his family when he was alive because you weren’t interested in genealogy then.

The will you need is in the safe on board the Titanic.

Copies of old newspapers have holes occurring only on the surnames.

John, son of Thomas, the immigrant whom your relatives claim as the family progenitor, died on board ship at
age 10.

Your gr. grandfather’s newspaper obituary states that he died leaving no issue of record.

The keeper of the vital records you need has just been insulted by an another genealogist.

The relative who had all the family photographs gave them all to her daughter who has no interest in genealogy and no inclination to share.

The only record you find for your gr. grandfather is that his property was sold at a sheriff’s sale for insolvency.

The one document that would supply the missing link in your dead-end line has been lost due to fire, flood or war.

The town clerk to whom you wrote for the information sends you a long handwritten letter which is totally illegible.

The spelling for your European ancestor’s name bears no relationship to its current spelling or pronunciation.

None of the pictures in your recently deceased grandmother’s photo album have names written on them.

No one in your family tree ever did anything noteworthy, owned property, was sued or was named in wills.

You learn that your great aunt’s executor just sold her life’s collection of family genealogical materials to a flea market dealer “somewhere in New York City.”

Ink fades and paper deteriorates at a rate inversely proportional to the value of the data recorded.

The 37 volume, sixteen thousand page history of your county of origin isn’t indexed.

You finally find your gr. grandparent’s wedding records and discover that the brides’ father was named John Smith.

__________

 

Whoever said “Seek and ye shall find” was not a genealogist.

__________

Strangers in the Box

 

Come, look with me inside this drawer,
In this box I’ve often seen,
At the pictures, black and white,
Faces proud, still, and serene.

I wish I knew the people,
These strangers in the box,
Their names and all their memories,
Are lost among my socks.

I wonder what their lives were like,
How did they spend their days?
What about their special times?
I’ll never know their ways.

If only someone had taken time,
To tell, who, what, where, and when,
These faces of my heritage,
Would come to life again.

Could this become the fate,
Of the pictures we take today?
The faces and the memories,
Someday to be passed away?

Take time to save your stories,
Seize the opportunity when it knocks,
Or someday you and yours,
Could be strangers in the box.

Originally posted 2016-04-26 10:17:36. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Transcription: The last Will and Testament of Hannah Stone

 

Last Will and Testament of Hannah Stone

 

Hannah

 

Stone

 

3

This is the last Will and testament of me Hannah Stone of Weymouth and Melcombe Regis in the County of Dorset ???? woman made this twenty fourth day of  April one thousand eight hundred and thirty four ffirst I direct my just debts ffuneral and testamentary expenses to be paid by my Executrix hereafter married And all the Rest Residue and Remainders of my household goods ffurniture linen cows cattle and all other my personal estate and effects what nature or kind ????? I give and do bequeath unto my daughter Ann Corney wife of William Corney of Weymouth aforesaid Sailmaker to and for her own use and benefit and I hereby appoint my said daughter sole Executrix of this my will and lastly I hereby revoke all wills codicils and other testamentary dispositions made by me at any time or times heretofore and do publish and declare this to be my last will and testament In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written The Mark and Seal of Hannah Stone ?? signed seales published and declared by the said Hannah Stone the Executrix as and for her last Will and Testament in the presence of us who in her presence at her request and in the presence of each other have subscribed our names as witnesses thereto Fred Chas. Sleggatt S??  Weymouth Thos. Corrall
Proved at London 15th October 1835 before the judge by the oath… (remainder missing)

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

Originally posted 2015-12-03 17:09:54. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Mark Blythe to Barack Obama Relationship Chart

 

The relationship chart illustrating the multi-generational, multi-cultural, multi-racial connections between Barack Obama and my husband Mark Blythe.

 

A while ago, we saw a genealogy chart in a Chicago newspaper online showing Barack Obama’s family tree, which includes one Ulrich Stehle (Steely), born about 1720 and died before 1773, living the entire time in Pennsylvania.

The connection is through Barack’s maternal line from his mother Stanley Ann Dunham and Mark’s paternal line.

We later discovered that Barack Obama and Mark are both related to John Bunch, the first documented slave in America, as described in a previous post.

Mark Blythe to Barack Obama Relationship Chart
Mark Blythe to Barack Obama Relationship Chart

Originally posted 2016-10-26 05:37:38. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Creating and safeguarding a digital library of genealogy records and images.

 

The first consideration when starting to research your genealogy is creating and safeguarding a digital library of genealogy records and images.

 

Creating and safeguarding a digital library of genealogy records.
The importance of creating and safeguarding a digital library of genealogy records.

I have been a computer user from the day of the old single-use word processors. Therefore, I tend to digitize everything into my own digital library of valuables from family photos, tax documents, bills, bank records, correspondence – and of course, genealogy records, genealogy databases and data.

I’m not a novice. I’m well aware of the pitfalls of relying on a digital library, but I’m as guilty as the next person for procrastination and rationalization.

When it comes to doing the tasks necessary to ensure my genealogy records are secure and permanent, I tend to think, “It’s OK, I’ll do it later.”

There are, however, some very serious pitfalls of putting these things off.

Some of the compelling reasons for digitizing records include:

  • Immediacy of sending genealogy records digitally over the internet.
  • Ease of organization, storage, searching and reproduction.
  • Ability to share family genealogy records between yourself and others.
  • Retain genealogy records in condition at the time of scanning to safeguard against the inevitable ravages of time on physical documents, etc.
  • More and more genealogy records are “born-digital”, never having been in physical form at all.

The digital backup we are used to is not sufficient to safeguard and archive records. The process required includes:

  • Storing with background, technical and descriptive information.
  • Storing records in several locations.
  • Archiving for a very lengthy period of time.
  • Saving genealogy data at a very high resolution.
  • Periodically backing up stored genealogy records to new media to prevent loss of data.
  • Converting file formats and media to new ones to avoid obsolescence.
  • Ensuring access to the digital genealogy records collection.

For my own digital archive storage, I am using a 1 terabyte hard drive and save all important genealogy documents and photos to it. If my sum total of research at this point wasn’t as large as it is, I would use the ‘cloud’ as a backup. But there are limits to the quantity of data it will hold.

All of my original genealogy files and data are on my computer.

I also transfer the files periodically to a new backup using the newest technology and format.

I don’t believe in using CDs, DVDs or even flash drives for permanent storage at all as I’ve had too many fail.

photo credit: Sean MacEntee via photopin cc

Originally posted 2017-01-21 11:25:02. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Transcription – Civil War letters of Pte. David Coon now completed.

I’m very happy to say I have finally completed the transcription of the 100+ pages of letters from Pte. David Coon to his family during his time of service and his capture and imprisonment by Confederate forces in Libby Prison and then Salsbury Prison, where he died late in 1864.

I do apologize for taking so long, but it was a great deal of work and had to be done when I could find time amid my responsibilities updating and maintaining my four blogs and my daily responsibilities as a wife and mother of two young adults.

I have divided the transcription into individual website pages containing 10 pages of letters each. The pages can be easily scrolled through using the page navigation links at the bottom of each web page.

This is a treasured artifact of our family. We do not hold the original letters, but we do have an original typed transcription of the letters completed in 1913 (interestingly enough, 100 years old as of this year) by David’s son Dr. John W. Coon.

My Signature

Transcription: In Memoriam for Jean X. Roy.

The following is my transcription of the In Memoriam for Jean X. Roy upon his death.

Jean-Xavier Roy Memorial
‘In Memoriam’ for Jean-Xavier Roy.

In loving Memory of

Jean X. Roy

Died December 21, 1979

PRAYER

O GENTLEST Heart of Jesus ever present in the Blessed Sacrament, ever consumed with burning love for the poor captive souls in Purgatory have mercy on the soul of Thy departed servant. Be not severe in Thy judgment but let some drops of Thy Precious Blood fall upon the devouring flames and do Thou O Merciful Savior send Thy angels to conduct Thy departed servant to a place of refreshment, light and peace.

J. N. Boufford and Sons Inc.

_____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

King Richard III’s genome to be sequenced by scientists.

Previous posts I’ve written described our fascination with King Richard III and the search for his grave, which ended successfully when his skeleton was unearthed in a Leicester parking lot in England.

Richard III, King of England

Now scientists have announced they will be sequencing Richard III’s DNA, which is of great interest to us and numerous other descendants of Richard III and his family.

He is an ancestor of Mark’s family and has been the subject of some research on my part. The resulting posts were:

Richard III's grave in Leicester parking lot.I’ve been toying with the idea of getting Mark’s and my DNA, and now that DNA profiles are more prevalent, it’s looking more and more like it would be a worthwhile endeavor.

Tombstone plaque for Richard III.Research can only be so accurate. Every family and generation has experienced their scandals and secrets that were never documented, and which may have affected the recorded ancestries, such as a child born from an illicit affair that was never disclosed. Even more questionable are the undocumented connections.

DNA might be helpful in solving some mysteries in more recent generations of branches of my family, as it is the one and only way we might have to prove blood connections to family and ancestors, either confirming or refuting the documentary evidence. It would be wonderful to have some of my questions answered and suspicions and theories confirmed.

photo credit: University of Leicester via photopin cc

photo credit: OZinOH via photopin cc

photo credit: lisby1 via photopin cc

Transcription: US, WWI Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 – John Croll Macpherson for John Croll MacPherson

This is my transcription of the US, WWI Draft Registration Card for John Croll Macpherson.

REGISTRATION CARD

US WWI Draft Registration Card for John MacPherson
US WWI Draft Registration Card for John MacPherson

SERIAL NUMBER: 1658

ORDER NUMBER: A782

CELL 1

John Crowl Macpherson     (First Name, Middle Name, Last Name)

CELL 2

PERMANENT HOME ADDRESS

1230 E. Flanders, Portland, Multnomah, Oregon     (No., Street or R.F.D. No., City or town, County, State)

CELL 3

Age in Years     32

CELL 4

Date of Birth     April 7, 1886     (Month, Day, Year)

_______________________________

RACE

CELL 5        White     X

CELL 6        Negro

CELL 7       Oriental

                    Indian

CELL 8       Citizen

CELL 9       Noncitizen

U.S. CITIZEN

CELL 10     Native Born

CELL 11     Naturalized

CELL 12     Citizen by Father’s Naturalization Before Registrant’s Majority

ALIEN    

CELL 13      Declarant     X

CELL 14      Non-declarant

CELL 15      If not a citizen of the U.S. of what nation are you a citizen or subject?     Scotland

PRESENT OCCUPATION

CELL 16      Mgr. Bakery

EMPLOYER’S NAME

CELL 17      Meier & Frank Co.

PLACE OF EMPLOYMENT OR BUSINESS

CELL 18      Sth (?) Morrison Portland Multnomah Or.     (No., Street or R.F.D. No., City or town, County, State)

NEAREST RELATIVE

NAME

CELL 19      Hilda Macpherson

ADDRESS

CELL 20      1230 E. Flanders Multnomah Or.     (No., Street or R.F.D. No., City or town, County, State)

I AFFIRM THAT I HAVE VERIFIED ABOVE ANSWERS AND THAT THEY ARE TRUE.

P.M.G.O.

Form No. 1 (Red)

John Croll MacPherson

(Registrant ?????????????????????)         (OVER)

REGISTRAR’S REPORT

36-1-16 “C”

DESCRIPTION OF REGISTRANT

HEIGHT

CELL 21      Tall

CELL 22      Medium     X

CELL 23      Short

BUILD

CELL 24      Slender

CELL 25      Medium

CELL 26      Stout

COLOR OF EYES

CELL 27      Brown

COLOR OF HAIR

CELL 28      Brown

CELL 29      Has person lost arm, leg, hand, eye, or is he obviously physically disqualified? (Specify.)     No.

CELL 30     

I certify that my answers are true; that the person registered has read or has had read to him his own answers; that I have witnessed his signature or mark, and that all of his answers of which I have knowledge are true, except as follows:

_____________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________

Mrs. William W. Porter

(Signature of Registrar)

Date of Registration     Sept. 12, 1918.

STAMP:

      |      LOCAL BOARD

      |     DIV. NO. 7

      |     COURT HOUSE

      |     PORTLAND, OREG.

(The stamp of the Local Board having jurisdiction of the area in which the registrant has his permanent home shall be placed in this box.)

??-????     (OVER)

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

Transcription: Whitcomb burials of Lancaster, Massachusetts, prior to 1850.

Whitcomb Burials
Whitcomb Burials

Transcription of the Whitcomb burials of Lancaster, Massachusetts, prior to  1850.

THE

BIRTH, MARRIAGE AND DEATH

REGISTER,

CHURCH RECORDS AND EPITAPHS

OF

LANCASTER, MASSACHUSETTS

1643-1850

EDITED BY
HENRY S. NOURSE, A. M.
______

LANCASTER:
1890

EPITAPHS IN LANCASTER BURIAL GROUNDS OF
DATE PRIOR TO 1850.
____________

Whitcomb BurialsTHE OLD BURIAL FIELD.

The founders of the town, and their descendants during the 17th century at least, buried their dead without formal services—foll0wing the custom of the Puritans in England-—and perhaps a plot of ground for the family graves was sometimes selected within the home lot or orchard. Early in the present century ancient graves were visible near the sites of both the Roper and the Prescott garrisons. But in the infancy of the Nashaway Plantation, land adjoining the meeting-house site was set apart for common use as a “burying place.” The practice of marking graves by incribed headstones probably did not begin until after the resettlement, one apparent exception being that of Mrs. Dorothy Prescott, who died in I674. The oldest date now to be found is that over the grave of the first ]ohn Houghton—I684. For half a century all memorial stones were but fragments of slate riven from some ledge, or rough granite slabs, upon which unskilled hands rudely incised name and date,—the latter being often upon a foot-stone or on the back of the head-stone. Many of the older inscriptions are illegible to most eyes. In his History of Lancaster, Reverend A. P. Marvin has given a plan of this ancient burial place, upon which the marked graves are located and numbered, and has added literal copies of the epitaphs. In the following carefully revised list of inscriptions the same numbering is adopted. Their arrangement is indicated by division lines. Numbers omitted are of stones not lettered, or of misplaced foot-stones found to belong with other numbers.

Whitcomb Burials of Lancaster, Massachusettts
Whitcomb Burials of Lancaster, Massachusettts

410

LANCASTER RECORDS.

HERE LIES BURIED I Ye BODY OF MR | JEREMIAH WILSON| WHO DEPARTED | THIS LIFE | MARCH Ye 22d | A D 1743 | IN Ye 77th YEAR | OF HIS AGE
HERE LIES | THE BODY OF | JOSIAH WHE | TCOMB SEN. D | ECEASED IN H | IS 80 YEAR | JW DYED | MARCH THE | 21 1718
Here Lyes Buried | ye Body of Mr | DAVID WHETCOMB \ Who Died April | 11th 1730 in ye 62d | Year of His Age
Here lied Buried | ye Body of Mrs. Mary | Whetcomb Wife to | Mr. David Whetcomb, | Who Died Janury | 5th, 1733-4 in ye 67th | Year of Her Age.
Here Lyes Buried | ye Body of Mr. HEZEKIAH WHETCOMB | Who Died May 6th. | 1732 in ye 31st Year | of His Age

Of the 4 Whetcomb gravestones legible prior to 1850 only the stone of Josiah Whetcomb remains in 2013.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

Here’s how to find unindexed records on Ancestry.com .

unindexed recordsNews Flash! Unindexed records are available on Ancestry.com and they can be searched if you know how.

I certainly didn’t realize that Ancestry.com indexing does not include all records until I read a post by Crista Cowan on the <a rel=”nofollow” href=”http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/07/25/browsing-records-on-ancestry-com-video/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ancestry+%28Ancestry.com +blog%29&utm_content=Netvibes” target=”_blank”>Ancestry.com blog.

For this reason, it can pay to view an entire record set for additional information. She includes a video tutorial for browsing full collections on Ancestry. This is a great way to find elusive information that could help get through those brick walls.

photo credit: deflam via photopin cc

Chris Hadfield and Benedict Cumberbatch are cousins?

To coincide with the return of Commander Chris Hadfield from the international space station, Ancestry.ca has announced that he is 6th cousin to british actor Benedict Cumberbatch who is starring as the villain in Star Trek Into Darkness.

Chris Hadfield’s role being based in reality, Benedict Cumberbatch’s based in fantasy, they both explore the frontier of space.

I loved Benedict Cumberbatch as Sherlock Holmes in the recent series and as much as I’m indifferent to all space epics, I might just watch Star Trek Into Darkness, solely because he’s in it.

It’s a small world, uh-h-h, universe?

Newfoundland and Labrador are the gems of Canada.

Melanson Village Community Hall
Melanson Village Community Hall

Mark is scared to death.

As we get closer to retirement, I’ve been focusing on possible places we could retire to. Unfortunately, unless something drastic changes, it isn’t likely we’ll be able to afford to stay in British Columbia, where the average home price in our area is $375,000.

This is not what Mark wants to hear. His family has lived in Chilliwack, British Columbia since the 1930’s after his grandmother sold the family farm on the Saskatchewan prairie.

I always thought like Mark. Having spent most of my life in British Columbia among the mountains, I never could foresee living elsewhere – until 2005 when we traveled to Nova Scotia and New Brunswick to research my mother’s Melanson, Acadian family history.

New Brunswick was pretty in its own way and it was great seeing it as we drove through, but there was something primal tugging at me in Nova Scotia. Each of the Acadian sites we visited tugged at me more and more.

Melanson Mountain Sign
Melanson Mountain directional sign.

I had this strange feeling of ‘welcome home’, which was bolstered by the odd coincidences we experienced, the people we met and the places we discovered. One of the weird coincidences was my being disappointed in how little there was in my family’s pioneer ‘Melanson Settlement’ site.

All my life I’d heard my mother talk about the dike systems devised by the Acadians to drain the land on the ocean front and create some of the most fertile farmland anywhere. We were never able to find an example of the aboiteau (dike valves) that were used – not at Grand Pré museum, nor at the Melanson Settlement site or anywhere else. Yet, that very day, on our way after seeing the Melanson Settlement and being very disappointed, we happened upon a non-descript little house with a sign out front, “North Hills Museum.” We decided to stop and check it out. It seemed like the usual home refurbished to look as it had centuries before with period furnishings, art, utensils, dishware, etc. We did, however, strike up a conversation with the woman working there and upon mentioning our disappointment in the Melanson Settlement and not being able to find an aboiteau, she said, “We have an aboiteau stored here, ready to be archived and put on display.” I couldn’t believe it and my mind raced as she led us to a back barn being used as a storage shed – and there was the aboiteau. From one angle it looked like  a log, but looking up from the open end, the valve could be seen and it was easy to imagine it in operation. This and other odd coincidences such as the graveyard tour at Fort Anne being led by Alan Melanson, another direct Melanson descendant, led to my feeling like we were expected and welcomed.

Since this trip to Nova Scotia and my resulting love of the area, I’ve been checking out properties there and have seen some amazing, waterfront acreages with heritage homes for $100,000 or less. This would be ideal for our retirement budget. Every time I show Mark one of these, I can see the panic in his eyes.

Over the last few years, I’ve been noticing the wonderfully charming, quaint commercials being produced by Newfoundland and Labrador Tourism. Each time, I feel so sorry that we never ventured that far while visiting the east coast on our genealogical quest. There’s something about the charm and hominess of these ads that invokes the same kind of ‘Welcome Home’ feeling and I mentioned to Mark that it might be smart to consider retiring there as well. The bonus there is that the rugged waterfront, high cliffs and jagged rocks are somewhat reminiscent of our Rocky Mountains in British Columbia. Again, I immediately saw panic in Mark’s eyes.

After this experience, I truly believe there is an innate tie between us and the homeland of our ancestors. I’d never seen Nova Scotia before and have no explanation for the deep draw and connection I experienced.

I still wonder at the ads produced by Newfoundland and Labrador tourism and have placed the videos of my favorites below.

Newfoundland and Labrador Tourism Videos

Iceberg Alley

Secret Place

Most Easterly Point

Gros Morne

Conversation

Vikings

Architecture

Place Names

The Edge

Thousands of wills online, including Shakespeare, Austen and Drake.

I was so excited to hear the news that thousands of wills are now online by Ancestry.co.uk. Among the wills published are those of famous and noted individuals including William Shakespeare, Jane Austen, and Sir Francis Drake.

Thousands of wills are now online.
Thousands of wills now online.

According to Ancestry.co.uk’s news site, “We’ve just added the most important collection of wills for England and Wales from before 1858 proved by the Prerogative Court of Canterbury. It’s packed with wills from members of the old middle and upper classes and paints a rich picture of life at that time.”

Richard Chatterton Will
Thousands of wills now online.

Of all of the source documents I’ve worked with, my favorite are wills. I love the look of the beautiful scripts used throughout history and thoroughly enjoy the challenge of transcribing them as accurately as possible. I find that wills are the most information and ‘colorful’ documents. Yes, yes, I know they’re pen and ink and ‘black and white’ in reality, but what I mean by ‘colorful’ is that they provide the details of the lives of the persons involved. It’s never just dates, locations, etc. Wills provide the prologue, main story and epilogue of an individual’s life and introduces us to their family and sometimes friends. We learn details of financial circumstances, social standing, property owned, and best of all, their relationships, whether good or bad.

Once we have come to understand the contents of a will, we know more of their life story. Although they are only accessible through paid subscription, Ancestry.co.uk offers a 14 day trial period for users to check it out before committing to a full subscription.

How to Apply for a Métis Status Card

Symbols of MetisTo apply for a Métis Status Card (aka Aboriginal Status card, Indian Status card), first you need to get the required information to prove your native ancestors. If you’re wondering about who qualifies for Métis Status, generally anyone with Native ancestors is biologically Métis. Which card you have depends on who your ancestors were.

Usually this means you need to start with yourself, and work backward through your family tree. You cannot randomly pick out a native american you were told “you might be related to” and try to match your tree with that person. This is why it can take some time to get your tree together and time to find a native ancestral line.

Start by making a family tree chart. Every person on the chart has 2 parents, so they become like branches in the tree (you can find blank tree charts online). Write your name and birthdate as the first person, then add your parents as branches in the next column, then their parents in the next column, etc., with each generation in a separate column. Add the birthdates and marriage dates for each generation. Eventually you will need to search archival records or church records for previous generations, but always work backward in time, verifying ancestors as you go.

If and when you do find your native ancestors, you will need to get copies of all records linking each generation back along that line, because most organizations do not do this for you without charging a fee, as it is so time-consuming. Métis organizations are not funded by government to find your native ancestors and prove that line. It is up to you to prove to them who you are. Some organizations will not verify your line at all, and will simply refuse membership.

For yourself, you need a birth or baptism record that states who your parents were. Then for every person along that line, you will need a record that states who their parents were. Usually this is referred to as a “long form” record, because it provides proof of parents’ names. Because some families have multiple persons with the same name, the only way to know for sure whether each person is completely documented is to have both the birth and marriage records that state parents’ names. You will need records like this for each generation going back to your native ancestor. Names and dates obtained from regular internet sites or family trees are not considered proof. You need to get copies of the government or church records, or other legal documents, either online or from that agency.

Once you have copies of all the actual records to prove your native line (without any unproven gaps in the line), you need to find out which Métis organization best fits your ancestry, and will represent you as a member of their Métis community.

Métis organizations have different requirements, objectives, and offer different kinds of representation. They are not usually affiliated with each other and do not share the same membership information. They also offer varying services for the application fee. Some only give aboriginal status cards, others offer programs and services. If you are interested in having help with your tree and also knowing the results of whatever is found, you should ask the organization about this service, what it will cost, and what you will get for your money, as some provide your tree information and others don’t.

Before applying, you might want to speak to their representatives or employees personally, to help determine the likelihood of being accepted into their community, and whether you feel their community best represents you and your ancestry. Some organizations may deny you status if you don’t have a specific type of proof, so you don’t want to find out that you have paid an application fee only to be turned down, then have to pay another organization to apply to their registry. Conversely, other organizations may seem to require very little proof.

Either way, a solid Métis community registry should contain documented proof of every generation, from your baptism or birth record to your native ancestor, without gaps. If you only have your standard issued birth certificate that does not state your parents’ names, then you need to either get your baptism record from your church or your “long form” birth certificate, which is available from the government, and send in copies to the organization. You will also need this same kind of document for each generation. This is the only way a registry can prove that all of its members are actually descended from Native Americans. The amount of funding an organization gets will depend on the number of registrants who have complete documentation, and whether your organization is prepared to negotiate funding on your behalf.

Once you have decided which group to apply to and have got your paperwork in order, you are ready to apply for your Métis Card.

Go to the organization’s website, and download the Métis Status Card Application Form. Fill out one application per person. Add your documented proof either by supplying copies (never send actual records), or scan them as computer files.

Include the required photo, and sign the application. Either mail the package or send it by email with payment for processing (never send cash in the mail).

Check periodically to see if your application will likely be processed soon. Some organizations take over a year to process so you shouldn’t wait until the last minute. Once you have your status, you can let others in the family and community know how to apply for Métis Status Cards too!

Article Source:

Article Source:

Richard 3rd’s facial reconstruction illustrates show family traits can span generations.

A while ago, I watched with great interest the progress of the effort to positively identify the remains found in a Leicester parking lot as those of Richard III, as described in a past post.
News was later released that a Richard 3rd’s facial reconstruction was done from his skull and a photo was published on News Leicester next to that of his 17th generation nephew, Michael Ibsen.

Marsh Blythe: Richard 3rd's facial reconstruction illustrates show family traits can span generations.

Portrait of Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky.

I hope it’s not just me, but I can see a familial resemblance and wonder if the likeness of Michael Ibsen had any bearing on the artist’s rendering, or if it was indeed solely based on the skull. If it is only based on Richard III’s skull, the resemblance is quite striking.

In an earlier post, I posted images of, and described the remarkable resemblance between my father-in-law (see right) and Isaac Shelby, nephew of my father-in-law’s seventh great grandfather (see above left), Governor of Kentucky and hero of the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812.

I only wish I could one day compare these images with images of the original Shelby family immigrant, Evan (Dhu) Isaac Shelby (direct ancestor to both).

In another instance I had conducted research into a family friend’s background with the story surrounding the mysterious ‘aunt’ of another ancestor in mind. This aunt had always intrigued the family as they never knew much about her.

My research led me to the story of a young, single girl working as a domestic in the home of a wealthy business man, and soon becoming pregnant and bearing an illegitimate child. This girl turned out to be the mysterious aunt, only the ancestor, although believing she was an aunt, never learned she was actually her mother.

I wondered if this ‘aunt’ had become pregnant by her employer as there were no other males of an age to be candidates in the household. I managed to locate photos of a second generation descendant and his son who still owned and operated the family business. Upon comparison, I could see a definite likeness, although not quite as marked as in the two examples above. This likeness strengthened my belief that my conjecture was correct.

Without documentary proof of any kind and with no possibility of DNA testing, this is the best I can do.

It’s truly amazing to me how similar and consistent family traits can remain over the generations.

Bones unearthed could be those of Richard III, King of England.

, 1st cousin 24 times removed to my children, was King of England from 1483 to 1485, yet is most widely known in our time as the scandalous title character of the play ‘Richard III’ by William Shakespeare. His reign ended upon his death in the Battle of Bosworth Field.

Richard’s checkered past before becoming King included becoming Duke of Gloucester on November 1, 1461. He was then appointed Admiral of England, Ireland and Aquitaine on October 12, 1462 and made Constable of England October 17, 1469. Besides suspicion over the disappearance of the princes, his reputation as a scoundrel was cemented by suspicion of his participation in the murder of Edward Prince of Wales, whose widow he married, as well as becoming Great Chamberlain of England in succession to his brother George, Duke of Clarence on February 21, 1478, the same day he was murdered.

Upon the death of Richard’s brother Edward, Richard became Lord Protector of the Realm for the heir apparent, Edward’s 12 year old son King Edward V. Richard escorted Edward V to the Tower of London, where he was placed, to be joined later by his brother Richard. Before young King Edward was crowned, Edward IV’s marriage to the boys’ mother Elizabeth Woodville was declared invalid, illegitimizing the children, negating their claim to the throne and making Richard III the heir to the throne. Princes Edward and Richard disappeared and accusations soon arose that Richard had the boys killed.

Richard married (Westminster Abbey 12 Jul 1472) as her second husband, Anne Neville, widow of Edward, Prince of Wales, and daughter of Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick and Anne Beauchamp.

Accounts of the time describe Richard as having a condition of the spine causing his right shoulder to be considerably higher than his left. This condition is now widely believed to have been scoliosis, an exaggerated curvature of the spine that can be severe and debilitating.

Based on the accounts of Richard’s physical disability and the fatal injuries he sustained in the battle now lead archaelogists to believe they have unearthed the grave of Richard III.

This grave existed under a parking lot on the grounds originally belonging to Greyfriars Abbey in Leicester, the church where Richard was supposedly buried. The bones show evidence of similar wounds and a spinal condition similar to what has been described. As optimistic as archaelogists are, they are seeking to prove his identity by performing a DNA test on a living, direct ancestor to Richard’s sister.

I’m hoping there will be some way the DNA information from this testing will be made available for others like my husband and children to compare to in an effort to prove our own connection.

Sources:

  1. Foundation for Medieval Genealogy; http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#_Toc321390527
  2. Wikipedia.org; http://www.wikipedia.org
  3. Kings and Queens of England – The Plantagenets, The Royal Family online; http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page58.asp.
  4. Kings and Queens of England – The Yorkists, The Royal Family online; http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page47.asp.

 

 

DNA Solved Mystery for the Child of the Last US Soldier Killed in Vietnam

On Friday, the family of John O’Neal Rucker gathered with Tia McConnell and her husband Allan and their two boys Matthew and Quentin at the Veterans’ Memorial at Linden’s courthouse to honor her newly discovered father.

Tia had been an orphan in Da Nang, and was adopted by Karen and Jack Whittier of Colorado after being evacuated from Vietnam. After a lengthy and problematic search for her birth family, Tia discovered that John Rucker was her father.

She honored her father with placement of a flag at the monument that recognized him as the last American soldier to die in Vietnam. Rucker had been a member of 366 Combat Support Group, 366th Tactical Fighter Wing during the Vietnam War, and was the last American soldier to die in Vietnam, having been killed by a rocket attack on January 27, 1973. Sadly, this attack and John’s subsequent death occurred only hours before the Paris Peace Accords were signed, ending the Vietnam War.

Mae Rucker, John’s mother, had met Tia and her family the day before, after Tia’s search led to John and DNA testing proved the connection. Despite a negative first test in comparison to John’s mother, they persevered and had another test done to confirm the result. This time her DNA was compared with John’s two sisters and the tests were positive, indicating a 91 percent match, which is impossible unless the parties are closely related.

This story has finally convinced Mark and I to get our DNA tested. It’s something I’ve been considering for quite a while now, but I’ve been hesitant because I wasn’t sure I trusted the process enough yet.

Mark and I want to test our DNA rather than our children’s because we feel it would allow us to maintain separation of the data from our two different branches. I’m curious to find if my suspicions are correct and there are commonalities between the two branches.

I’ll post later about the process and results.

Transcription: US WWII Draft Registration Card for Albert Rascher

Transcription: US WWII Draft Registration Card for Albert Rascher.

Albert Rascher WWII Draft Card
Albert Rascher WWII Draft Card

REGISTRATION CARD — (Men born on or after April 28, 1877 and on or before February 16, 1897)

Line 1
SERIAL NUMBER: U827
NAME: Albert Rascher
ORDER NUMBER:

Line 2
PLACE OF RESIDENCE: R.F.D. No. 1 – Arlington Heights Cook Illinois
(The place of residence given on the line above will determine local board jurisdiction; line 2 of registration certificate will be identical)

Line 3
MAILING ADDRESS: Same
(Mailing address if other than line 2. If same, insert word same)

Line 4
TELEPHONE: None

Line 5
AGE IN YEARS: 47; DATE OF BIRTH: August – 14 – 1894

Line 6
PLACE OF BIRTH: Palatine Illinois

Line 7
NAME AND ADDRESS OF PERSON WHO WILL ALWAYS KNOW YOUR ADDRESS: Mrs. Meta Rascher, Same

Line 8
EMPLOYER’S NAME AND ADDRESS: Roselle Country Club

Line 9
PLACE OF EMPLOYMENT OR BUSINESS: Roselle – Illinois  Cook
(Number and street or R. F. D. number) (Town) (State)

I AFFIRM THAT I HAVE VERIFIED ABOVE ANSWERS AND THAT THEY ARE TRUE.

D. S. S. FORM 1 16-21630-2    Albert Rascher
(Revised 4-1-42)      (over)        (Registrant’s Signature)

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

Sometimes it pays to look to the present for information about the past.

It’s amazing what information about the past including people and events can be found by searching through online newspapers, magazines, etc. – even if they are in a foreign language.

I’m routinely having to read, translate and understand documents written in their original language such as French, German, Swedish, and so on. My go to method for getting started is accessing ‘Google Translate’. To have a web page translated, just type the complete original language url in the Google search box, press ‘search’, find what you’re looking for in the search results list and click on ‘Translate this page’.

El Economista TranslatedOne such site I’ve recently accessed was ‘El Economista’ a Mexican, Spanish language online newspaper. On this particular day, the headlines were dominated by news of Javier Duarte de Ochoa and his handling of the crisis created by the recent tropical storm. Javier Duarte is the Governor of Veracruz, Mexico.

Above is a clip from the Google translated site mentioned and as you can see the text in the first paragraph is quite understandable, although not quite grammatically correct. I would always suggest finding independent confirmation elsewhere to confirm your understanding, if possible.

I routinely search through newspapers in the areas in which I’m researching and I have stumbled upon some real ‘gems’ related to my research, including a rooming house arson fire a recent ancestor escaped from, another ancestor whose name was published as a deserter in WWI, and most recently news of a tragic train crash in a community from which my own father’s French Canadian family originates. It was particularly heartbreaking to read the names of the deceased in the online French language news sites, and to recognize many of them as distant relatives.

Using Google translate  is also a useful tool if transcribing documents from their original language. Go to the main Google translate page, type the text in question in the left box, making sure it’s labeled with the correct language and click ‘Translate’. The English translation will appear to the right if English is the selected language. Text can be translated to and from numerous languages.

photo credit: Augie Schwer via photopin cc

Transcription: US WWII Draft Registration Card for Frank John Niles

US WWII Draft Registration Card for Frank John Niles.

U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942 of Frank Niles
U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942 of Frank Niles

 

REGISTRATION CARD — (Men born on or after April 28, 1877 and on or before February 16, 1897)

Line 1
SERIAL NUMBER: U1257
NAME: Frank John Niles
ORDER NUMBER:

Line 2
PLACE OF RESIDENCE: West Milton, Miami, Ohio
(The place of residence given on the line above will determine local board jurisdiction; line 2 of registration certificate will be identical)

Line 3
MAILING ADDRESS: Same
(Mailing address if other than line 2. If same, insert word same)

Line 4
TELEPHONE: None

Line 5
AGE IN YEARS: 57; DATE OF BIRTH: June 18, 1885

Line 6
PLACE OF BIRTH: West Milton, Ohio

Line 7
NAME AND ADDRESS OF PERSON WHO WILL ALWAYS KNOW YOUR ADDRESS: Bobbie Niles, West Milton, Ohio

Line 8
EMPLOYER’S NAME AND ADDRESS: Harry Sexhour, West Milton, O.

Line 9
PLACE OF EMPLOYMENT OR BUSINESS:   West Milton, Miami, Ohio
(Number and street or R. F. D. number)     (Town)     (State)

I AFFIRM THAT I HAVE VERIFIED ABOVE ANSWERS AND THAT THEY ARE TRUE.

D. S. S. FORM 1                         16-21630-2      Frank Niles
(Revised 4-1-42)     (over)                                   (Registrant’s Signature)

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

We must fight for our veterans as they fought for us.

We must fight for our veterans.
poppy field

Remembrance Day is fast approaching and this is one very important day I always recognize with a post on this blog.

My family’s history is well-entrenched in military service.

  • My father was in the military for 30 years.
  • My father-in-law was in the military for over 30 years.
  • My husband, Mark served 20 years.

They all served tours in hostile environments.

Our family have also lost two family members in WWI, one being Pte Philias Joseph Albert Emery during advance actions at Vimy Ridge, and the other being Pte Joseph Turmaine in the Battle of Courcelette.

I have always thought that our government was not doing enough to help veterans who are disabled as a result of their duties.

I’m appalled to say that under this present Conservative government, instead of improving, the conditions and treatment of our valued veterans are much, much worse.

Reading this post at Change.org prompted me to write about his myself and I encourage everyone to go online at the Change.org site to sign the petition demanding better financial, physical and mental health care, and administrative treatment of our veterans.

This video of a rant by Rick Mercer on behalf of our veterans is a good example of just one area of concern.

Author credit: Christine Blythe, Feathering the Empty Nest Blog

photo credit: Dukas.Ju via photopin cc

Transcription: Obituary for Camille Vachon

The following is a transcription of the French text of an obituary for Camille Vachon.

 

Camille Vachon
Camille Vachon

VACHON, Camille

À l’Hôtel-Dieu de Lévis, le  20 juin 1990, à l’âge de 83 ans et 10 mois, est décédé monsieur Camille Vachon, époux de dame Marie-Anna Boily. Il démeurait à Sts-Anges. La famille recevre les condoléances à la salle municipale, 317, des Érables à Sts-Anges, vendredi de 13h 30 à 16h 30 et de 19h à 22h, samedi de 13h à 14h 45. Le service religieux sera célébre le samedi 23 juin, à 15h, en l’église de Sts-Anges et de là au cimetiére paroissial, sous la direction de la Maison.

Armand Plante Inc.
875, Ste-Thérèse
St-Joseph

Il laisse dans le deuil, outre son épouse, ses enfants, gendres et belles-filles: Marie-Laure (Melvine Gagné), Laurent (Annette Drouin), Magella (Marie-Claire Drouin), Reina, Gemma (Laurent Lallamme), Guimond (Françoise Turmel), Thérèse (Adrien Lacroix), Pierrette (Denis Lagrange), ses vingt-deux petits-enfants, ses sept arriéres-petits-enfants; son frère et demi-soeurs: Valère, Germaine (Adélard Tardif), Eva, Iréne (Hermel Doyon), Agathe, Fernand (Jeannine Crenier), Rita (Antonio Labrie), Carmella (Freddy Jolicoeur), Imelda, ses neveus, niéces, cousins, cousines et de nombreus ami(e)s. Pour renseignements, 1-397-6948.

 

ENGLISH TRANSLATION (via Google Translate)

At the Hôtel-Dieu de Lévis, on 20 June 1990 at the age of 83 years and 10 months, Camille Mr. Vachon died, husband of Marie-Anna Boily. He remained in Sts-Anges. Family condolences will be received at the Municipal Hall , 317 Maples Sts-Anges, Friday from 13h 30 to 16h 30 and 19h to 22h Saturday from 13h to 14h 45. The funeral service will be held Saturday, June 23 at 15h, in the church of Sts-Anges and then to the parish cemetery under the direction of the house.

Armand Plante Inc.
875 , Ste- Thérèse
St. Joseph

He is survived by, in addition to his wife, children, sons and daughters, Marie-Laure (Melvin Won), Lawrence (Annette Drouin), Majella (Drouin Marie- Claire), Reina, Gemma (Laurent Lallamme), Guimond (Françoise Turmel), Therese (Adrien Lacroix), Pierrette (Denis Lagrange), twenty- two grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren, his brother and half-sisters: Valere, Germaine (Adelard Tardif), Eva, Iréne (Hermel Doyon), Agathe, Fernand (Jeannine Crenier), Rita (Antonio Labrie), Carmella (Freddy Jolicoeur), Imelda, his nephews, nieces, cousins ​​and numerous friends. For more information, 1-397-6948.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.